Bed Bugs How Do They Reproduce

How fast do bedbugs reproduce ?

Wiki User
August 25, 2009 1:30PM

It depends. If you have a major infestation in your bed or

nearby they will reproduce and multiplyextremely quickly,

the more adult bedbugs there are the faster will they multiply

which is why the sooner you take action to get rid of the

infestation the better for you. But in the very early stages there

will be no reproduction. To explain this you need to understand

bedbug nymphscan not lay eggs nor reproduce. So after you

get your first bedbug eggs hatching in your home, (most likely as a

result of bedbug eggs being laid inside your luggage somewhere

where you stayed when you were on holiday after you unpack very

probably without seeing the tiny eggs in the luggage which will be

stuck to a hard surface out of sight in a crevice inside the

holdall or suitcase a few days after you get home the eggs will

first hatch. Each bedbug egg wherever it hatches in or near a home

produces a bedbug nymph in its first or smallest stage.After

hatching the newly born nymph will be able to detect the breath of

any person or persons asleep even50 meters or more from where

it hatches. So it will instinctively crawl and climb towards the

source of that because it already knows that is a source of food.

When it finds your sleeping place it will climb up or occasionally

drop down into your bed and bite you for its first blood meal and

it takes it about 3 minutes to complete that meal. although you are

very unlikely to feel anything when it is having its meal off you

because it injects a kind of anaesthetic into you which makes you

go numb. After its first meal the nymph will find a hiding place

such as in a crevice inside your mattress and come back for more

meals on subsequent nights. so an infestation of your bed is

progressing probably without you knowing. Each nymph goes through

5 nymph stages of moultingand growing in size, and it needs

a blood meal off you or somebody else asleep after each nymph

stage. So it will take 3 weeks after the eggs hatch before the

nymphs become adult bedbugs and you are unlikely to realise a

bedbug infestation has started in your bed during this period as

they only come out at night when you are likely to be fast asleep

and when it is dark. So once they have become adult bedbugs from

then on the bedbugs will be able to reproduce andfemale bedbugs

lay up to a dozen eggs per day! So in its first week one female

adult bedbug may lay 70 or more bedbug eggs in or nearyour

bed, usually in crags or crevices perhaps in nearby furniture

or in floorboards under the carpet or in your mattress near where

you sleep.So within 2 or 3 months after your holiday when the

first bedbug nymph first found your bed, you could well have a

thousand or more bedbugs and perhaps 500 females laying more

and more eggs in or near your bed and you are likely to get bitten

more and more every night and get red marks all over you . All the

beds in your home will probably soon become infested. as when one

bed is getting overcrowded bedbugs are likely to detect the breath

of somebody else asleep in your home and move there to set up their

base and have their meals on future nights when that person is

Top 10 Myths about Bedbugs

The insects, making a comeback around the globe, cannot fly and are really not interested in hanging out on your body–but they do occasionally bite during the day

  • By Megan Scudellari on May 27, 2011

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Once a pest of the past, bedbugs now infest every state in the U.S..Cimex lectularius—small, flattened insects that feed solely on mammalian and avian blood—have been living with humans since ancient times. Abundant in the U.S. prior to World War II, bedbugs all but vanished during the 1940s and ’50s thanks to improvements in hygiene and the use of pesticides. In the past 10 years, however, the pests have staged a comeback worldwide—an outbreak after the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney was a harbinger of things to come. This revival may be the worst yet, experts say, due to densely populated urban areas, global travel and increasing pesticide resistance—something to consider as the summer travel season gets underway.

"By every metric that we use, it’s getting worse and worse," says Coby Schal, an entomologist at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. Health authorities and pest control operators are regularly flooded with calls, and the epidemic may not have yet peaked. And because bedbugs are indoor pests, there are no high or low seasons throughout the year, he adds, only continual bombardment. "It’s just the beginning of the problem in the U.S.," Schal says.

Spreading rapidly with the bedbugs is a mass of misinformation about their biology and behavior. Straight from the experts, here are the facts behind some of the most notorious myths about the diminutive bloodsuckers.

Myth 1: Bedbugs can fly
Bedbugs lack wings, and therefore cannot fly. That is unless you put a blow dryer behind them, says Stephen Kells, a bedbug researcher at the University of Minnesota. Then they’ll fly about 1.2 meters. On their own, bedbugs crawl about a meter a minute, he says.

Myth 2: Bedbugs reproduce quickly
Compared with other insects, bedbugs are slow to reproduce: Each adult female produces about one egg per day; a common housefly lays 500 eggs over three to four days. Each bedbug egg takes 10 days to hatch and another five to six weeks for the offspring to develop into an adult.

Myth 3: Bedbugs can typically live a year without a meal
Scientists debate this point, but evidence suggests that at normal room temperature, about 23 degrees Celsius, bedbugs can only survive two to three months without a blood meal. But because they are cold-blooded, their metabolism will slow down in chillier climates, and the insects may live up to a year without feeding.

Myth 4: Bedbugs bite only at night
Although bedbugs are generally nocturnal, they’re like humans—if they’re hungry, they’ll get up and get something to eat. "If you go away to visit a friend for a week and you come back and sit down on the couch, even though it’s daytime the bedbugs will come looking for you," Schal says. Keeping a light on, then, unfortunately does not keep these tiny vampires away.

Myth 5: Bedbugs live exclusively in mattresses
"’Bedbug’ is such a misnomer," Kells says. "They should also be called pet bugs and suitcase bugs and train bugs and movie theater bugs." Bedbugs spread away from beds into living areas and can be seen on any surface, he says, including chairs, railings and ceilings.

Myth 6: Bedbugs prefer unsanitary, urban conditions
"Bedbugs are terribly nondiscriminatory," Schal says. Bedbugs can be found anywhere from ritzy high-rises to homeless shelters. The prevalence of the bugs in low-income housing is therefore not a result of the insect’s preference, but of dense populations and the lack of money to pay for proper elimination strategies. "Any location is vulnerable," Kells says. "But some people are going to have a harder time getting control of them because it is such an expensive treatment."

Myth 7: Bedbugs travel on our bodies
Bedbugs do not like heat, Kells says. They therefore do not stick in hair or on skin, like lice or ticks, and prefer not to remain in our clothes close to our bodily heat. Bedbugs are more likely to travel on backpacks, luggage, shoes and other items farther removed from our bodies.

Myth 8: Bedbugs transmit disease
Bedbug bites can lead to anxiety, sleeplessness and even secondary infections, but there have been no reported cases of bedbugs transmitting disease to humans. They do, however, harbor human pathogens: At least 27 viruses, bacteria, protozoa and more have been found in bedbugs, although these microbes do not reproduce or multiply within the insects. Canadian researchers announced (pdf) in the June issue ofEmerging Infectious Diseasesthat bedbugs isolated from three individuals in a Vancouver hospital carried methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus, aka MRSA. Still, there have been no reported cases that the bugs actually transmit human disease.

Myth 9: We should bring back DDT
When the controversial pesticide DDT was banned in 1972, most bed bugs were already resistant to it, Schal says, and today’s populations are even more widely resistant thanks to the use of a new class of pesticides. Pyrethroids, the main class of pesticides used against bedbugs today, targets sodium channels in bedbug cells, just like DDT. Consequently, as bedbugs develop resistance to pyrethroids, they also become cross-resistant to DDT.

How do bed bugs multiply?

You should hate bed bugs because of two reasons: They disturb you and reproduce rapidly. So, how bed bugs reproduce and what can stop them multiplying?

What are bed bugs?

Bed bugs are parasites that feed on blood. They feed only on blood and unfortunately, their main food source is human.

A bed bug has 3 life stages and its size varies from 1 to 6 mm depending on its stage. You can find more information about bed bugs stages in this post: bedbugdetected.com/bed-bug-life-stages

Physical features of bed bugs are below:

  • They are flat and oval-shaped
  • Half-winged (so little useless wings so, no wings at all)
  • Reddish brown colored (More reddish after recently fed)

What do bed bugs look like?

They are not microscopic creatures so, you can see them with naked eye. What you have to know about bed bugs firstly is they can’t fly or jump which means that if you see an insect flying or jumping, you can eliminate bed bug option easily.

Bed bug eggs

Here is a video showing bed bug eggs:

Bed bugs aren’t mammalians which means they multiply by laying. Bed bug eggs can be differentiated from other bug eggs with their shapes and appearances on the floor.

Bed bug eggs are yellow white, they stand together and glued to the surface, mostly in cracks. The most distinguishing feature of those eggs from the other bug eggs is “glue”.

Other places where bed bugs lay their eggs are:

  • Behind walls
  • Inside clothes
  • Mattress
  • Behind wall papers
  • Other places near to their food source

Beg bugs male/female ratio

This is important because reproducing activity of beg bugs depend on the number of females. After laying their eggs, the number of female and male eggs hatching is almost the same: 1:1 ratio.

Success hatching ratio of a female is usually more than 95 percent.

How fast bed bugs spread?

Laying ability of a female adult bed bug depends on how much it feeds. So, more blood they can have, more eggs they will produce.

After a female bed bugs feeds enough once, she will produce 1 to 7 eggs per a day for next 10 days.

Eggs will hatch in 7 to 10 days if the air condition is suitable for them, otherwise hatching time can take up to 30 days.

So, a female bed bug can hatch 100 to 500 eggs in her lifetime which means they will reproduce rapidly and if no action is taken, the invasion will be inevitable.

How fast bed bugs grow?

After hatching, new born bed bug will have 2 more life stages. First will be nymph and this stage has 5 instars in it.

They will need a month in average to become an adult which has a body size more than 5 mm.

How long bed bugs survive without feeding

The main reason what makes bag bugs invasive is their resistance to hunger. They can survive without feeding at least for months, nevertheless it was observed that they can live without feeding for more than a year in some cases.

Ideal temperature for bed bugs

Ideal environment for bed bugs is where the temperature is between 65° and 85°. So, their activity will reduce below 65° and above 85°.

What prevents bed bugs from reproducing?

Under these conditions, their reproducing speed gets slower or ends:

  • If they can’t feed enough
  • If they are not close to their food sources
  • If the environment temperature is not between 65° and 85°.

Conclusion

What you must know about bed bugs reproduce are:

  • They usually start mating after 1 month they hatched.
  • They multiply by laying.
  • Their eggs are glued and in group.
  • Hatching success for the eggs is more than 95 percent.
  • An adult female can lay 100 to 500 eggs during her lifetime.
  • They are more reproductive during ideal condition: When the feed enough and it’s 65° and 85° around.
  • If no action is taken on time, you must face a bed bug invasion.

For more information about bed bugs, you can check these posts:

Bed Bug Reproduction

By DoMyOwn staff

How do bed bugs reproduce?

Male and Female bed bugs mate by what is called traumatic insemination. The traumatic insemination takes place by basically stabbing the female’s abdomen with a specialized hardened reproductive organ. The fertilization can take place at any location on the abdomen and the male’s gametes will travel to her ovaries or reproductive gametes. Once fertilization occurs the female contains viable eggs for 5-7 weeks. After three or so days of feeding, the female begins to lay eggs. As the female lays eggs, she continues to feed. She can produce an average of 3-8 eggs a week. The eggs hatch and immediately feed.

Female bed bugs are capable of laying as many as twelve eggs each day after being fertilized and having a proper blood meal. They are deposited in small cracks and crevices along bed frames, baseboards, and carpet linings. The female lays the eggs with an adhesive layer to assure that the eggs will stay in place. The baby bed bugs will hatch from the eggs in around six to seventeen days. The young emerge and immediately begin to feed or search for food. Nymphs and adults are able to survive long periods of time without food. Bed bugs usually live for a year to a year and a half. Three or more generations can occur each year.

To stop bed bug reproduction, use an IGR (insect growth regulator). For bed bugs, we specifically recommend using Gentrol IGR.

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How Bed Bugs Reproduce

In order to prevent the spread of bed bugs, it’s important to understand how they reproduce. Bedbugs reproduce via hypodermic insemination, also known as traumatic insemination. Male bugs use their genitalia to pierce the females anywhere on the abdomen, releasing sperm into the body. The sperm migrate through her abdominal fluiduntil they arrive at the ovaries, resulting in fertilization of the eggs.

The mating process is traumatic for female bed bugs, and they are frequently injured in the process. The wound can result in infection and leakage of blood, which reduces the lifespan of the female. For this reason, female bugs will avoid excessive mating where possible. After mating, they prefer to move to a location where they can remain undisturbed with a guaranteed food supply. In a safe environment, a female bed bug will typically lay between one to seven eggs each day, following each blood meal.

Bed bugs generally live for 12 to 18 months. During her lifetime, a female bed bug will lay up to 250 eggs. The milky-white eggs are roughly one millimeter long, and visible to the naked eye.The eggs are deposited in crevices and cracks on bed frames, baseboards, furniture and carpets. The female uses an adhesive layer to ensure the eggs remain in place.

Because mating results in scarring, females that have mated many times within a short period of time will produce fewer eggs. Females that have time to recover from the mating process will produce more eggs. This phenomenon helps increase the proliferation of bed bugs, because pregnant females will travel to new locations to avoid male bugs.

Eggs hatch within 1-2 weeks. The nymphs that emerge can feed on blood immediately, but are unable to reproduce until they have fully matured. Theyundergo five molting stages before reaching adulthood. During each stage they must feed at least once. The time taken to mature depends on the temperature – from three weeks in warm weather to four months in cold weather.

A female bed bug may mate with any of her adult offspring, and will lay eggs continuously assuming she has access to a blood meal. Thismeans a single pregnant female can easilycreate an infestation of five thousand bugs within six months.

A 2010 study discovered that bed bug nymphs release a pheromone that prevents males from attempting to mate with them. Scientists hope to eventually use this pheromone to disrupt bed bug reproduction and reduce infestations.

If you really want to get rid of bed bugs today try SayByeBugs! It was developed as a safe and highly effective alternative among a sea of products that rarely deliver on their promises.

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