How A Bed Bug Look Like

Bedbugs

Bedbugs are small insects that often live on furniture or bedding. Their bites can be itchy, but do not usually cause other health problems.

Check if it’s bedbugs

Jeff March / Alamy Stock Photo

Bedbugs can hide in many places, including on bed frames, mattresses, clothing, furniture, behind pictures and under loose wallpaper.

Signs of bedbugs include:

  • bites – often on areas exposed while sleeping, like the face, neck and arms
  • spots of blood on your bedding – from the bites or from squashing a bedbug
  • small brown spots on bedding or furniture (bedbug poo)

Bedbug bites can be red and itchy. They’re often in a line or cluster.

Otto Pleska / Alamy Stock Photo

Some people have a reaction to the bites. They can be very itchy and there may be painful swelling.

How you can treat bedbug bites

Bedbug bites usually clear up on their own in a week or so.

Things you can do include:

  • putting something cool, like a clean, damp cloth, on the affected area to help with the itching and any swelling
  • keeping the affected area clean
  • not scratching the bites to avoid getting an infection

You can ask a pharmacist about:

  • using a mild steroid cream like hydrocortisone cream to ease bedbug bites (children under 10 and pregnant women should get advice from a doctor before using hydrocortisone cream)
  • antihistamines – these may help if the bites are very itchy and you’re unable to sleep

Non-urgent advice: See a GP if:

  • the bites are still very painful, swollen or itchy after trying treatments from a pharmacist
  • the redness around the bites is spreading

You may have an infection and need treatment with antibiotics.

Coronavirus update: how to contact a GP

It’s still important to get help from a GP if you need it. To contact your GP surgery:

  • visit their website
  • use the NHS App
  • call them

How to get rid of bedbugs

contact your local council or pest control service – it’s unlikely you’ll be able to get rid of bedbugs yourself because they can be resistant to some insecticides

wash affected bedding and clothing – use a hot wash (60C) or tumble dry on a hot setting for at least 30 minutes

put affected clothing and bedding in a plastic bag and put it in the freezer (-16C) for 4 days (alternative to hot washing)

clean and vacuum regularly – bedbugs are found in both clean and dirty places, but regular cleaning will help you spot them early

do not keep clutter around your bed

do not bring secondhand furniture indoors without carefully checking it first

do not take luggage or clothing indoors without checking it carefully if you have come from somewhere where you know there were bedbugs

Page last reviewed: 21 January 2019
Next review due: 21 January 2022

5 Bugs that look like bed bugs

No one wants a case of bed bugs, so spotting bugs that look like bed bugs or unidentified bites on your body often incites panic. Because bed bugs are so small and elusive, they can also be difficult to identify. Our pest specialists can help you determine your particular pest problem and craft a solution to bring you peace of mind. The following is a list of five bugs that are often mistaken for bed bugs.

1. Bat bugs

Color:Brown

Description:Bat bugs are the most similar to the bed bug of any on this list. Really the only observable difference between the two is that bat bugs have longer hairs on their heads.

Size:¼” – the size of an apple seed

Shape:Oval

Do Bat Bugs have wings?Bat Bugs have wing pads, but no functional wings.

Do Bat Bugs bite?Bat bugs will bite, but only if bats aren’t around.

Where are Bat Bugs found?Despite what their name suggests, bat bugs usually aren’t found on bats, but rather where bats live.

2. Spider beetles

Color:May range from pale brownish yellow to reddish brown to almost black

Description:Spider Beetles have long, thin legs and antennae, all covered with hairs. It has no “neck” as its head is directly connected to its body.

Size:1/32-3/16” (1-5mm)

Shape:Usually oval

Do Spider Beetles have wings?Yes, but only some species can fly.

Do Spider Beetles bite?No.

Where are Spider Beetles found?Spider beetles are often found in wooden structures and near sources of food. Poor sanitation often leads to Spider Beetle infestations.

3. Booklice

Color:Pale brown or creamy yellow

Description:Booklice closely resemble termites, with soft bodies and long, thin antennae.

Size:1/32-1/4” (1-6mm)

Shape:Segmented (head and body are separate)

Do Booklice have wings?sometimes – if present, there will be 4 held rooflike over body and rest

Do Booklice bite:No, but scientists believe their dead bodies in tandem with dust may contribute to asthma attacks.

Where are Booklice found?Booklice are often found in areas of high humidity, such as damp books, because they easily become dehydrated.

4. Carpet beetles

Color:Black with white pattern and orange/red scales

Description:The head of the Carpet Beetle is mostly hidden when looking from above, but short, visible antennae extend from it.varied carpet beetle

Size:1/16-1/8” (2-3.8mm)

Shape:Oval

Do Carpet Beetles have wings?Yes, adults fly during the daytime.

Do Carpet Beetles bite?No, but they are known to cause dermatitis in humans, due to allergic reactions.

Where are Carpet Beetles found?Carpet beetles are typically found on flowers and sometimes on fabrics (specifically carpet). They are often brought inside on fresh-cut flowers.

5. Fleas

Color:Reddish brown

Description:Fleas have long legs and round heads with a comb extending from Cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis), attacking also humans. Isolated opn whitethe mouth.

Size:Approximately ⅛”

Shape:Laterally flattened and segmented

Do Fleas have wings?No.

Do Fleas bite?Yes, and the bites are traditionally very itchy. Additionally, fleas are a vector for various diseases.

Where found:Fleas are often brought in from outdoors on animals.

Whether or not your infestation is that of bed bugs, Ehrlich is here to help. Call us at 800-837-5520 or contact us online to find out what our pest experts can do for you.

What Do Bed Bugs Look Like?

Bed bugs have small, flat, oval-shaped bodies. They are wingless. Adults do have the vestiges of wings called wing pads, but they do not fully develop into functional wings.

Adults are brown in color, although their bodies redden after feeding. Full-grown bed bugs move relatively slowly and measure between 4 to 5 mm. Homeowners sometimes have the misconception that bed bugs are too small to see with the naked eye. The nymphs may be small and difficult to see, but the adults are detectable with the naked eye and may be found in the cracks and crevices they use to hide.

Newly hatched nymphs are approximately the size of the head of a pin and are white or tan until they feed. They often are described as being about the size and shape of an apple seed.

Bed Bug Control

Cimex lectularius L.

Learn what bed bugs look like, and how to detect if you have a bed bug Infestation.

Find out how bed bugs infiltrate your home and where they are attracted to.

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Learn how Orkin handles bed bugs, homeopathic cures and the cost of bed bug extermination services.

PestPolicy

Baby bed bugs (simply nymphs) are the bed bugs going through the initial 5 stages of their life-cycle.

They’ll be straw or light brown (before taking a blood meal) and the size of a pin head.

Bed bug (Cimex lectularius) infest over 20% of Americans homes.

Its important to control the bed bugs nymphs in your house, bed frames, or mattress encasements. Check what bed bug look like?

What Do Baby Bed Bugs Look Like? 99+Images

First, check out the below video. Its a quick preview of how bed bugs look like – luckily this video shows the bed bugs in all their life-stages – including the baby bed bugs-nymphs.

What Do Baby Bed Bugs Look Like?

The bed bug species that mainly attack human beings are theCimex hemipterus or the Cimex lectularius. Adult bed bugs (females) lay about 250 viable eggs.

The baby bed bugs-nymphs pass through 5 juvenile “nymph” stages as they molt towards attaining the adult stage – the wingless, reddish-brown, blood-sucking insects.

Sidenote: Always spray against bedbugs, fleas or roaches on used clothes and furniture before you get them into your house. But also, check this guide on how to use steam heat treatment, rubbing alcohol, Ammonia, bleach, or Lysol to kill bed bugs

1. Appearance and Size

In exact size, Nymphs are in between the bed bug eggs (1 mm / 0.09 inches) to the size of an adult bed bug (4.5 mm / 0.18 inches).

However, immature bed bugs are tiny in size (definitely) but will grow bigger as they suck more blood and molt.

It’s important to note that it’s possible to see nymphs with the naked eye. An adult bed bug will be something like an apple seed in size (about 4.5mm), and its red or brown in color.

Bed Bugs Life cycle. Credit: phdmc.org

The baby bed bugs-nymphs add about 0.5 mm of its size at each molting stage (of the 5 juvenile “nymph” stages). However, do not confuse a cluster of bed bug eggs (with each measuring about 1 mm) with the nymphs.

At the 5th nymph stages, the baby bed bug has a size almost equal to their adult counterparts. But for more clarity, check out the video (Courtesy of Sandy Honess) and see how you can differentiate the nymphs from the adult bed bugs.

2. Shape andColor

Nymphs have an oval just like their counterparts. So, the main difference between the nymphs and the adult bed bugs is just the color. Immediately after hatching, nymphs will be yellow-white (almost colorless) but will turn reddish or brown as they feed on blood.

Before they suck blood, bed bugs are relatively thin and hence will easily slip through cracks and crevices into mattress covers, and furniture spaces where they hid waiting to lay eggs or attack their next host.

Do baby bed bugs Jump or Crawl?

First things first, baby bed bug, just like the adult bed bugs, can fly or jump. However, these bugs have a very fast speed when running on a flat surface, ceilings, walls, and floors.

To be specific, bed bugs will clock about 4 feet every second. Wondering if even adult bed bugs can fly? Do Check this Guide for more details.

Nevertheless, compared to insects like fleas that can hop and jump around, bed bugs can only crawl or run very fast on floors and other surfaces. Actually, nothing would qualify as an adventure in the movement of bed bugs.

Further, because of the bugs wide body and short legs, they’ll only crawl low in the ground. However, despite moving very fast, they would not easily significantly exceed their regular crawling speed.

Will bed bugs climb up rough surfaces?Bed bugs, including the baby bed bugs-nymphs, have small hooks on their legs. Therefore, these structures the bugs hold onto pores, cracks or crevices of different rough surfaces and thus quickly climb up metals, plastics, walls, cloths, or timber. On the flip side, bed bugs cannot climb up on smoother covers such as glass and porcelain.

Can bed bugs push off heavy obstacles?Equally, because of their wide body and short legs, the bed bugs won’t do great in moving in thick carpets, hair, or some busy terrain.

Further, the short legs are also too frail to push heavy objects aside particularly when moving in thick hair, carpets or grass. Therefore, in such cases, they would opt to climb up the objects and drop on the other side or simply circumnavigate them.

Do Baby Bed Bugs Bite?

Immediately after hatching, the nymphs from the eggs ( nymphs ) need to suck a pint of human (of your pets’) to allow it to grow, live and molt into other lifecycle stages.

Check the nymphs (Nymphs) – Color, Pictures, Movement. Side note: Bed bug eggs take 2 weeks to hatch after which the nymph move through the 5 molt stages during which they must feed on blood.

Therefore, the short answer isthat just like the adult bed bugs, the baby bed bugs-nymphs do bite human beings for blood. Interestingly, due to their growth requirements, the nymphs will bite humans (and such blood) more often. However, the bed bugs bites will disappear with 1-2 weeks.

But how do the bites from nymphs look like?Well, bites from the nymphs will look just like those from the adult bed bugs. As a reminder, such bites leave reddish bumps on your skin and are itchy too. Equally, nymphs will mainly bite your shoulders and arms – this can be compared to fleas that mainly bite the feet and ankles.

Where can baby bed bugs be found?

Despite that bites from bed bugs could be a significant sign of their presence in your premises, you must know how and where the bugs tend to hide so that you can easily control them.

First things first, the signs to look out for include blood spots or fecal matter (colored like rust) on your bedding or mattress.

Sadly, human beings can carry bead bugs and their nymphs in their clothes from one house to another. For example, the bugs may hitchhike your bags, purses, clothes, and luggage. However, they do not love the hairy pets such as cats and dogs.

But of course, you know that the nymphs can also trigger skin irritation and transmit diseases. Therefore, the best solution when you believe you have a bed bug infestation is to hire the services of a bed bug exterminator or spray on the adult or babies of bed bugs directly.

Is it a Bug, or is it a Bed Bug? Bugs That Look Like Bed Bugs

While there are numerous bugs that may look like bed bugs, there’s only one way to tell for sure. Learn how to tell bed bugs apart from other pests.

Discovering a bug in your house is an unpleasant experience. Discovering an insect has been tucked into bed with you all night? That’s enough to send a chill down your spine. It could be a one-time incident – or it could be a bed bug.

There are a number of other bugs that look likebed bugs, so how can you be sure this new intruder is a bed bug? There are a few things to look for.

What caused that bite?

Bite marks are one of the first red flags that prompt people to suspect a bug infestation. Even a small mosquito bite might be enough to send a diligent homeowner on a massive inquisition. But bite marks are bad indicators of the type of pest you are dealing with. Mosquitoes, spiders, fleas, bed bugs and even fruit flies, in rare cases, can leave behind itchy red bumps. Allergic reactions and high stress levels are also culprits for skin irritation.

What if I’ve got a bite and a bug?

So you think you’ve found your culprit? You’ve taken the prisoner of war and locked him up in a plastic sandwich bag (you should, this is useful evidence for a pest management professional). You are certain it is a bed bug, but is it? Or are you on a trail of bugs that look like bed bugs? Take a look at the following checkpoints:

What color is it?

What size is it?

What shape is it?

Does it have wings?

Does it bite?

What is its food source?

Is it a bed bug or a flea?

All of the above are bugs that look like bed bugs, but most of these bugs don’t bite. If you have clear evidence of repeated bite marks, you might be able to eliminate the others and focus on the flea. Fleas are most commonly found on animals, but are not picky about their hosts and will feed on humans too. The difference between bed bugs and fleas is that bed bugs are shaped more like an apple seed and crawl. Fleas are much smaller and jump when disturbed.

Bed bugs can create high levels of stress and anxiety. If you suspect you have an infestation, it is best to contact a professional pest management company.

Do Earwigs Bite?

If you shudder a little when you think about earwigs, you’re probably not alone. They’ve developed quite a nasty reputation, thanks to urban legends (mostly false) that have been circulating for years. But are they harmful?

The Lifespans of Insects With Short Lives

Many insects, such as butterflies, have a lifespan that occurs in four stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult. Other insects, such as grasshoppers, do not have a pupal stage and instead go through three stages: egg, nymph, and adult. The length of each stage can vary based on many things, from the insect species to the temperature outside—but what some insects share in common is a very short adult stage. Keep reading to learn about five insects with some of the shortest adult stages in their lifespan.

The Return of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

The change of seasons from summer to fall means many things: leaves changing colors, dropping temperatures, and—depending on where you live—stink bugs sneaking into your home. Stink bugs were named for their distinct ability to emit an unpleasant odor when they are threatened or disturbed by predators like lizards or birds. This also means that if stink bugs enter your home and feel threatened, you’ll be faced with dealing with their strong smell in your house. As we head into fall, you might find yourself with more active stink bugs than usual, so it’s important to know the basics about these smelly insects.

What are Earwigs?

Most people have probably heard of earwigs at some point or another. These creepy-looking insects are associated with some urban myths. Learn the truth about earwigs, including what attracts them and how to help get rid of them.

ARE TICKS DANGEROUS?

The majority of ticks will deliver painless bites without any noticeable symptoms. However, some ticks can carry a variety of bacteria and pathogens for disease. Although not all ticks are dangerous, you don’t want to risk coming into contact with these blood-sucking insects.

ARE TICKS DANGEROUS?

The majority of ticks will deliver painless bites without any noticeable symptoms. However, some ticks can carry a variety of bacteria and pathogens for disease. Although not all ticks are dangerous, you don’t want to risk coming into contact with these blood-sucking insects.

Are Bed Bugs Contagious?

Bed bugs are not too picky about where and when they catch a ride and don’t necessarily have a preferred mode of transportation, so it’s no surprise how many people wonder, are bed bugs contagious?

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