How Bed Bug Eggs Look Like

What do bed bug eggs look like? Pictures of bed bug eggs

Bed bugs live for nearly 10 months and go through a life cycle from egg to adult. Infestations typically begin with a female bed bug who bites her victim for blood when she arrives in her new home, and after that for another meal 2 weeks later. Then, she would lay eggs at a rate of 3 every day. Eggs would hatch in 2 weeks. The newborn nymph starts searching for food immediately and grows into an adult bed bug in 4 months. The speed of reproduction and general life span is influenced by heat in the room and what is described above assumes a room at 68F (20C). Every female bed bug lays nearly 3 to 8 eggs at once and up to 500 eggs during her 10-month life. What do bed bug eggs look like? All eggs are 1/25 inch and oval-shaped. Bed bugs usually lay eggs in a sticky group. A nymph will drink blood 24 hours after hatching.

What do bed bug eggs look like?

Bed bug eggs and feces

Bed bug eggs are shiny and differ from slightly transparent to white. That’s what do bed bug eggs look like. They are laid both in bed bug harborages and places far from them (female bed bugs often lay some eggs away from the main population). They have a sticky surface when they are fresh. It glues them to surfaces and makes them look shiny. Bed bug eggs are nearly 1 mm long.

They are more frequently laid on wooden and fabric surfaces than on plastic or metallic ones.

Eggshells

Empty egg shells

Empty egg husks are definitely signs of an increasing multi-generational bed bug infestation. Despite their small size, they can be seen by the naked eye, especially with the help of a magnifying glass.

They resemble dried out casings of live bed bug eggs but are not so shiny and more flattened.

They can be discovered in the locations where bed bugs hide, usually on rough surfaces.

While none of these signs are 100% proof of an active bed bug population, bugs don’t vanish on their own. So think of them as certain clues of the infestation – but don’t stop there. You have to prove the presence of bed bugs themselves to confirm it.

Nymphs

Newborn bed bug nymph

Newborn bed bugs, also known as nymphs, have smaller size and lighter color than grown-ups. They can be almost transparent until feeding, when they become blood red.

Depending on their age, bed bugs vary from tiny size (like a pin-head or poppy seed) when they’ve just hatched to approximately ¼” as they become adults.

Nymphs are often the first live bugs that are discovered because they usually drink blood more frequently than mature bugs.

What Do Bed Bug Eggs Look Like?

Knowing what bed bug eggs look like could help you defeat an infestation faster—and help prevent the bugs from coming back.

Courtesy Dini M. Miller, Ph.D

A bed bug’s life starts as a tiny egg, barely noticeable to the human eye. But in just days, this tiny, blood-sucking insect will hatch and be searching for its next blood meal in you.

Don’t believe this myth about bed bug eggs

You may have already read on some websites that bed bugs can lay up to 500 eggs in a lifetime. That’s something to freak out about—if it were true. Thankfully, it’s not. Virginia Tech entomologist Dini M. Miller, PhD, says that number is from dated research but still circulates today. The reported 500 eggs were based on one bed bug in a lab that was very fertile. Here’s something you can believe—the real causes of bed bugs.

How many eggs do bed bugs lay?

Dr. Dini Millers’ research lab at Virginia Tech says the more meals the female gets, the greater the number of eggs she will produce. So, if she is able to feed every week, she could produce five to 20 eggs. But she might not get to feed every week, in which case she would produce fewer eggs. According to Dr. Miller’s research, bed bugs can lay up to 113 eggs in a lifetime, which can be around a year.

Male bed bugs get frisky after a blood meal

After female and male bed bugs get their fill of blood from you, they head back to the harborage (their home) to digest their blood feast and mate. Dr. Miller’s research tells us male bed bugs are particularly interested in mating after a blood meal. Afterward and for the next several hours, their sperm will migrate to the female’s ovaries and fertilize her eggs. Check out what bed bugs look like after they eat and when they mate.

Bed bug eggs are dropped

Courtesy Dini M. Miller, Ph.D

Bed bug eggs are cream-colored and have an elongated shape that measures a tiny one millimeter in length. The female can lay her eggs singly or in groups. “Bed bugs can ‘glue’ their egg to a surface and it can remain there until it hatches if in an undisturbed location such as a crack or crevice. They can be dislodged though, so they can be found on the floor if scraped off,” says urban entomologist Jody Green, PhD, at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. The eggs are usually pretty safe unless a human comes along with a scraper or strong vacuum to suck them up. Vacuuming is one way to stay on top of bed bugs. Here are some other things you should be doing to keep bed bugs out.

Bed bug eggs are tough

You would think something as small and seemingly frail like a bed bug egg wouldn’t have much of a chance, yet Dr. Miller’s research says that under optimal conditions, just about 97 percent of the bed bug eggs hatch. Insecticides sold at the local hardware store can’t penetrate the protective eggshell, says Green. Even diatomaceous earth, one of the home remedies for bed bugs, only kills nymphs and adult bed bugs—not the eggs. Here’s what’s lethal to the eggs: Temperatures above 120 degrees, or below 0. Green says some professional products may be successful at wiping out the eggs but only with precise and proper application techniques.

Hatching time

A new generation of bed bugs will hatch between nine and 12 days of optimal room temperatures—around 72 degrees—Green says. Hatching takes longer under cooler conditions. Once the nymphs emerge, they immediately start searching for a blood meal. “Literature has suggested that nymphs require a blood meal soon because they may desiccate. A blood meal will help them with moisture, but they can also survive by hiding out in crevices in optimal temperatures of 70 to 90 degrees,” says Green. Even without a blood snack, nymphs may live for two to four months. Check out some more secrets bed bugs don’t want you to know.

What do bed bug eggs look like?

Bed bugs are ectoparasites that feed on the blood from a host animal. Unfortunately, these disturbing pests’ animal of choice is a human. In order to produce bed bug eggs, the female must first have a blood meal. After this blood meal, a female bed bug is capable of laying large numbers of eggs. With continued access to blood, she can lay as many as 500 to 600 eggs in her lifetime. If you are concerned about bed bugs in your home, there are two questions you might be asking yourself: “What do bed bug eggs look like?” and “Where do bed bugs lay eggs?” Let’s examine the answers to each.

Physical appearance of bed bug eggs

What do bed bug eggs look like? They are very small and white to pearl-white in color. They appear to be shaped like a barrel and are about the size of a pinhead or a grain of salt. They are covered with a sticky substance, which adheres to almost any surface the female places them on. If the eggs are more than five days old, they will have a conspicuous dark mark on them that resembles an eye.

Common areas where bed bug eggs are found

Where do bed bugs lay eggs? Once inside a structure, bed bugs do not travel far to feed or lay their eggs. Most eggs are laid in protected sites, as close to a food source as possible. These pests can fit into a crack no thicker than a business card and lay eggs.

Bed bugs feed most often at night while the host animal is at rest. Since they primarily feed on the blood of humans, the most likely place to find bed bug eggs is on or near the bed. Look closely for bed bug eggs on mattress seams and joints. It’s also common to find them on the box spring and behind the headboard, if it abuts or is attached to the wall. Near these sites you will most likely find markings of red or black “specks.” These markings are feces from the bed bugs that consist of partially digested blood. Large concentrations of bed bugs may be accompanied by a pungent, sweetish odor caused by secretions from their scent glands.

Although it has not been proven that these disgusting creatures transmit diseases to humans, just the thought of having a bed bug infestation in your home sucking your blood is enough to make your skin crawl. Take the worry out of trying to identify bed bug eggs and trying to find where they might be located in your home. Call the pest management professionals at Terminix® for a free bed bug inspection today. They know how to locate bed bugs and eliminate them.

How to Get Rid of Bed Bug Eggs

Bed bug infestations were common in the U.S before World War II. With the improvement in hygiene and extensive use of DDT in the 1940s and 1950s, bed bugs almost vanished. The people living in the U.S and even the pest control professionals had never seen a bed bug until recently. Bed bugs persisted in some parts of the world including Asia, Africa, and Eastern Europe. It is due to international travel and immigration that has caused bed bugs to reemerge in the U.S.

Bed bugs have started appearing in homes, hotels, schools, dormitories, shelters, public transport, and laundries and in rental furniture. Bed bug infestation is a growing concern in the U.S and people are desperately looking for ways to get rid of them.

Eradicating bed bugs is not as easy as getting rid of any other pests. Bed bugs are resistant pests that demand a more powerful and more extensive extermination method.

Table of Contents

What are Bed Bugs?

Bed bugs are fairly small insects with an oval-shaped, flat body. An adult bed bug is usually 5 mm in length. They might be mistaken for cockroaches, carpet beetles, ticks or other small insects. They have a characteristic reddish-brown color. They have hairy bodies. Bed bugs do not jump or fly. They rather crawl fast over the walls, floors, ceilings, and other surfaces.

Bed bugs feed on the blood of warm-blooded creatures. Their favorite host is human. They are light brown in color before they have fed, but after feeding, they appear rust colored or dark reddish brown. In short, bed bugs are blood-sucking insects that are not just scary but a nuisance that does not go away easily.

How Do Bed Bugs Reproduce?

Male and female bed bugs mate through a process called “traumatic insemination”. Mating occurs with the male bed bug stabbing the female bed bug in the abdomen by the male reproductive organ, which is specialized and hardened. The male bed bug ejaculates anywhere in the abdomen of the female bed bug. The male gametes travel to female gametes or ovaries where fertilization takes place. After fertilization has taken place, a female bed bug can carry fertilized eggs for 5 to 7 weeks.

Bed Bug Eggs

A female bed bug starts laying eggs 3 or more days after she has had a meal of blood. A female bed bug lays an average of 3 to 8 eggs a week. Female bed bugs have the capability of laying as many as 12 eggs per day.

Eggs are laid in places where there is a minimal disturbance. Most commonly, the female bed bug lays eggs in cracks or crevices near bed frames, carpet linings or baseboards. The eggs are coated with an adhesive naturally to ensure that they stay in place.

Hatching of Eggs

Bed bug eggs hatch in about 6 to 16 days. After the eggs hatch, the young bed bugs or the nymphs start feeding immediately. Bed bugs can go long periods without having fed. The life span of a bed bug is about a year to year and a half. Bed bugs can produce 3 generations in one year.

Frequency of Mating

Female bed bugs that have mated several times usually lay lesser eggs as compared to a bed bug that has had time for recuperation. According to studies, the healing process is necessary for a female bed bug to be able to produce more eggs. A female who has mated once will produce 25% more eggs than the one that has mated many times.

Due to this reason, many female bed bugs move to other places with a guaranteed food source before laying eggs. They look for places where there is a lack of mates. Also, the capability of a female bed bug to keep her eggs for 5 to 7 weeks provides her enough time to travel and find a suitable place to lay eggs .

Bed Bug Egg Pictures

How Many Eggs Do Bed Bugs Lay?

As mentioned earlier, female bed bugs are capable of laying 12 eggs per day. On average, they lay 1 to 7 eggs each day. They end up laying 200 to 250 eggs during their entire life which is about one year. The eggs hatch in 6 to 16 days.

Nymphs

When nymphs emerge from eggs, they are translucent. They immediately start their search for a meal. Once they feed, they undergo molting 5 times after which they become reddish brown in color. Molting is shedding of skin. Nymphs cannot reproduce as long as they have fully matured. A female bed bug may mate with its offspring after the nymph has matured.

Conditions for Egg Production

The primary condition for egg production is the availability of food source. The reason bed bugs reside near the host is to have easy access to a blood source they can feed on repeatedly. The more the quantity of meal a female bed bug takes the more eggs it will produce. If she has access to a reliable food source, she can produce more batches of eggs. A female bed bug is capable of producing 5 to 20 eggs from a single meal.

Where Do Bed Bugs Lay Eggs?

Bed bug infestation is most commonly found in beds. They prefer residing and laying eggs in a place which is close to the host so that feeding is easier. The places closest to the host are the bed frames, bed sheets, and the mattresses. Bed bugs lay eggs in the bed or any furniture that is close to the bed.

Bed bug eggs are sticky so they can easily adhere to the mattress, bed sheet or the curtains. Bed bugs prefer laying eggs in places where there will be the least disturbance. For example, if you usually sleep on the right side of the bed, the bed bug is likely to lay eggs under the pillow on the left side which has been left undisturbed. Bed bugs are found in clusters. Bed bug eggs are found in places with bed bugs, their droppings and bed bug shells.

Primary Harborage

The primary harborage for bed bugs is near the host. Their preference to live near the host is conditional; that is, only if they know they will be undisturbed. Bed bugs are attracted to the scent of carbon dioxide that the humans exhale. They can only detect the signs of the presence of a warm-blood creature from a very close distance, hence their preference to stay close to the host. Also, blood feedings become easier for bed bugs when they stay close to a meal source.

Secondary Harborage

If the bed bug infestation is severe, overcrowding of bed bugs near the host may occur. In such a situation, bed bugs move to places where there is a lesser crowd. These places are usually about 5 feet from the bed. These places include the carpet, the neighboring walls, and drawer joints.

If the infestation is extremely severe with the 5 feet radius from the bed being overcrowded as well, bed bugs may move further ahead to seek refuge. These places include electrical sockets, appliances, sofas, and other such furniture. Bed bugs are so tiny that they can accommodate in any place that is as thick as a credit card.

If we talk about conditions in which bed bugs can live, they can live in any condition in which their host can live. It is as simple as that!

Appearance of Bed Bug Eggs

If you are wondering how do bed bug eggs look like, you have your answer right here. Bed bug eggs are transparent in color but their shades may range from transparent to white. Bed bug eggs are about 1 millimeter long. Eggs are most commonly found sticking to wooden or fabric surfaces and less commonly on plastic or metallic ones.

Fresh bed bug eggs appear shiny due to a sticky substance that is secreted with the eggs. This sticky substance ensures that the eggs remain in place, stuck to the surface. Empty egg shells look like eggs but the difference is that they are not shiny and they appear more flattened. You might be wondering how you can see bed bug eggs. Empty eggs can be seen by the naked eye. If you see empty egg shells, you should realize that the bed bug infestation in your home is growing.

Bed Bugs in Hair

When we say bed bugs can reside anywhere, we literally mean anywhere. As gross as it sounds, we hate telling you that you can get bed bugs in your hair. However, you may feel better when we tell you that bed bugs are not capable of navigating through hair like lice. They may enter your hair, but they won’t stay there for long. Because of the way the bodies of bed bugs are built, they fail to navigate through human hair.

Bed Bug Eggs in Hair

As previously mentioned, bed bugs can hide in your hair. When they can hide, they can also lay eggs in your hair. But they most probably won’t do that. If the bed bug infestation in your hair is large, you may observe a bad odor coming from your hair. You may also notice blood stains on your pillow.

Bed bug bites on your scalp may feel bumpy and itchy. Bed bug bites are often observed to be in a straight row. You may feel a burning sensation in your hair when you apply shampoo while you bath. If you are certain that you have bed bugs in your hair, you should apply shampoo and comb through your hair regularly to make sure the bed bugs and bed bug eggs are removed.

If you feel that shampoo isn’t doing any good, you can try other remedies like rubbing alcohol or a combination of rubbing alcohol and almond. Washing your hair with water as hot as you can bear can drive the bed bugs away and even destroy the bed bug eggs.

Signs and Symptoms of Bed Bug Infestation

If you have a bed bug infestation, there are some obvious signs. Below is a list of signs that are characteristic of bed bug infestation.

  • Waking up with itchy red spots:
    bed bugs bite on any part of the skin that is exposed. Bed bug bites are small, red and itchy. The site of the bite may also be inflamed. Not all people get red, itchy bumps on their skin. It is important that you inspect your home regularly because if you are not getting any visible bites, it does not mean you might not have a bed bug infestation.
  • Bed bug bites are in a line:
    a bed bug usually bites in such a way that you get red, itchy bumps in a row. Bed bugs bite with a distinctive pattern. This helps you differentiate between bites from bed bugs and bites of fleas or mites.
  • Unexplained musty odor:
    bed bugs release pheromones. When the infestation is large, the amount of pheromones being released is fairly large too which causes a musty odor in your house. If you feel your house smells different, it may indicate a bed bug infestation.
  • Blood stains on bed sheets:
    bed bugs feed on human blood. They might leave behind the drippings from a bite on your bed sheets. You may roll over a bed bug in your sleep which leaves behind a prominent blood stain on the bed.
  • Rust colored spots on the mattress:
    bed bugs leave behind their fecal exudates on beddings. If you observe rust colored stains on your mattress or your bed sheets, you are most likely to have a bed bug infestation.
  • Dark spots on your walls:
    bed bugs can leave fecal stains beneath your wallpaper or on the walls. If you find dark, rusty stains on your walls, brace yourself for a bed bug infestation.
  • Finding a collection of bed bug shells:
    if you have a bed bug infestation, you may find bed bug egg shells or mottled skin shreds near your headboard, along with the sides of tour mattress, below the cushions on your sofas or near other wooden furniture. Bed bugs favor fabric and wood more than plastic or metal.
  • White spots on furniture joints:
    if you find any white spots, fairly small in size on the joints of your furniture, you should inspect the rest of your furniture and home for bed bug infestation. Tiny, white spots usually indicate small bugs or bed bug eggs.

Getting Rid of Bed Bug Eggs

Most of our focus is on bed bugs. However, if we do not treat bed bug eggs, the infestation will never end. If bed bug eggs are left behind, they will hatch and the nymphs will continue feeding on blood, maturing and reproducing which is something you would not want. You should employ methods that treat both live bed bugs and their eggs.

Many methods of killing bed bugs are available but you might be thinking how to kill bed bug eggs? Bed bug eggs can be killed by various methods, which are listed below.

Heat Treatments

Heavy Duty Dry Steamers:
Heat is most likely to kill bed bugs and their eggs. A heavy duty dry steamer can be used to reach all cracks, holes, and crevices where bed bugs may have laid eggs. With the help of a hose and other attachments of a dry steamer, you can reach all curves and depressions on furniture.

Portable Heaters and Fans:
Portable heaters and fans can also be used. With the help of this equipment, the temperature of air in a room is gradually increased to 120 – 130°F. Sensors are placed strategically that monitor the temperature. They can be used to de-infest areas like bedrooms, livings rooms, furnishings, and even the entire dwelling. This method of de-infestation does not damage any household items and kills the bed bugs and their eggs. If the temperature is being maintained at 45°C, the treatment takes up to 15 hours while it takes only 30 minutes if the temperature is 48°C.

Before methods that make use of high temperatures can be implemented, some preparations have to be made. These preparations include removal of aerosol cans, medications, indoor plants, and anything else that is heat sensitive. Heat treatment does not have any residual effect. It is recommended that the residents take with them as few belongings as possible because their belongings may become a source of bed bug re-infestation.

The biggest benefit of heat treatments is that the bed bug treatment occurs in one go, rather than over days or weeks. To make sure that no residual bed bugs remain, it is better to apply some insecticides.

Heat treatments can kill bed bugs and their eggs in just one day. They are more costly than conventional bed bug treatments and require specialized training.

Cold Treatments

Cold Water
Extreme low temperatures can kill bed bugs and their eggs by freezing them. Extremely cold water which is well below the freezing point (-32°F) can be used for washing clothes and bedding. Other items that cannot be washed can be placed in a freezing environment for about 30 days.

Carbon Dioxide Dry Snow
A freezing technique that is less common and more expensive is also available. This technique uses carbon dioxide cylinders. By converting carbon dioxide into dry snow and spraying over the area, the bed bugs and their eggs freeze to death. Ideally, the snow vapor should evaporate within 30 seconds to maximize the rate at which the bed bug body eliminates heat. The extensive heat loss f is what kills the bed bug eggs and the live bed bugs.

It leaves no residue behind. It creates no mess or stains. It is safe to use on most of the surfaces at home. The snow can easily penetrate into cracks and crevices, making sure all bed bugs and eggs are killed and eliminated from every hiding spot. This freezing technique does not damage furniture. Being non-toxic, it’s safe for use in any setting.

To make sure no bed bugs or eggs remain, pairing the technique with insecticides gives sure extermination of bed bugs and their eggs.

Diatomaceous Earth

Diatomaceous earth is not specifically made to kill bed bugs. However, it can kill bed bugs, their eggs, and any bugs that are exposed to it. It kills the bed bugs by drying them. You can sprinkle diatomaceous earth in any corners in the cracks and crevices and any place you suspect bed bugs might be present. Unlike sprays, their effect remains as long as you don’t clean it off. It is inexpensive and effective.

Insecticide Sprays

Numerous sprays are available that claim to kill bed bugs and bed bug eggs. However, insecticides cannot help you get rid of these pests when used alone. As long as you don’t use bed bug killing sprays in conjuncture with any other effective technique, bed bug sprays won’t help you significantly.

Identifying Bed Bug Eggs- How they look like, Images & destruction

Identifying bed bugs and their eggs comes in handy in not only differentiating between it and other household insects but also ensuring that you mount an appropriate response to them.

This might seem like a simple task but there has been a campaign that has debunked this.

In one campaign by the University of Minnesota, it was found out that many people couldn’t identify with a bed bug.

In its findings, it was shown that 76% of all the samples that had been submitted for identification were indeed not bed bugs. Now, if this was hard enough, then how about identifying bed bug eggs themselves? Read on to find out.

What do bed bug eggs look like- Color & Shells

After bed bugs have mated, the female is expected to lay eggs. The eggs are oval in shape and normally white in color. The size of the egg is approximately 1/32″ or 1/16″ long.

This size is typically smaller than a grain of rice but a rice grain is almost 50 times smaller. There have been propositions mentioning the efficacy of using a light-emitting diode (LED) to be able to shine on the eggs and make it easier for identification and observation.

One thing that you should know is that the eggs are so tiny that you wouldn’t necessarily see them with your naked eye. You will need to magnify their sizes with the use of a magnifying glass. This might still take you some time if you are looking for the eggs in a light-colored wall.

White wall are known as the biggest culprits and hide the eggs even from a magnifying glass. This is where your vision acuity comes in. Further magnification of the egg reveals that it is not all white but rather a conformity of a silvery and cream-colored appearance.

An unhatched egg has the cream-colored appearance while a hatched egg is silvery. The latter is basically a remnant of the shell of the egg.

In a dark colored setting, the eggs can be very visible to the naked eye and this might mean that the blocks are basically clusters of many eggs clutched together to form one big rice-grain-sized egg. In real sense, it is not however.

In regards to the shape, the egg is more ovoid or at times oblong. One end is marked by an eye spot that can be seen as a slightly dark mark.

It is important to be able to differentiate the fecal matter, eggs and egg shells of bed bugs. Well, as you might expect, the fecal matter is quite the opposite color of the eggs. They are dark in colour and can also be seen on the sidelines of mattresses or along the corners of your wall.

Are Bed Bug Eggs Hard-how do the feel like?

You might wonder why this question is of essence in discussions but they may as well point out to perhaps someone wanting to crush them, ease of removal from household items without squashing onto them or mere curiosity.

If you have bed bugs, you can feel them and determine their fragility. At first instance, you need to ensure that the eggs you are touching are indeed a bed-bug’s. You wouldn’t of course feel these very tiny eggs even when your mattress is heavily laden by them.

While there is not any defined texture that is associated with bed bug eggs, at least information from hear-say has established that bed bug eggs are soft and since they are too small, the feeling is like rubbing some dust through your fingers.

However, you can actually feel some bit of grittiness depicting some rounded content suggestive of eggs. Perhaps the reason as to why some people say the eggs are hard is due to the fact that the eggs are strongly adherent to the item they have been laid on.

Bed Bug Eggs, Shells Pictures & images

Egg shells

How many eggs do bed bugs lay-Where & How Often

Bed bugs are like egg-laying machines. An adult female bed bug lays about 2-3 eggs or at times even more in a day. This means that the bed bug may lay hundreds of eggs in its lifetime.

This has been stipulated to be between 200 and 250 eggs. The number of eggs laid per day will be dependent on the presence of optimal conditions that are required to lay eggs.

These eggs can be laid either in clusters or singly and therefore may be associated with a small time difference between subsequent laying.

This includes warm temperatures and enough blood-meal in a day. It is also known that a single female can be responsible for more than 4000 bed bugs within a span of f6 months.

When and where do bed bugs lay eggs

Bed bugs have a pre-determined specification of the place it can lay its eggs. They are bright and since danger poses when the eggs are visible, wit is often required.

Fortunately, many people already know about this. Owing to the color of the eggs, they are mostly deposited on the wall especially the white or cream-colored ones. They may be engraved in the crevices or cracks on wall and the corners of the walls.

They are commonly seen as a line of white tiny balls along the corner from the top to bottom. So long as an area is well protected, it serves as a potential hiding spot for the eggs. These are areas rarely accessed by anyone and therefore good for the wellbeing of the unhatched eggs.

In addition, the places need not obey the law of gravity as these eggs are highly adherent to the places they have been laid on.

Folds and seams of mattresses, box springs, frames of beds and plywood are potential places.

If you can take a look at your bed at its joints and even dismantle the bed itself, you will meet hundreds of eggs lodged.

You will find that there has been a history of hatching and laying cycles with shells visible and skins of a couple of nymphs already molted.

Bed bugs can also lay their eggs on you whether on your clothes or on parts that resemble a crevice or a hiding spot such as the folds of your abdomen or under-arm.

Whether they hatch on you is dependent on your level of hygiene. If your hygiene is poor, then you will definitely be one of the best nesting spots of bed bugs.

The time they lay

Bed bugs lay eggs at any time of the day. This depends on the responsible mating time.

However, some other factors may have an impact on the time the female chooses to lay. This school of thought is sparked by the fact that the eggs are normally found in designated places. This means that the location is an important determiner.

Life cycle-how long does it take bed bug eggs to hatch

After laying the eggs, it will take approximately 6 to 17 days for the eggs to get hatched. It is during this time that the new bed bug, nymph, seeks its first meal.

The range of time it takes for the eggs to hatch is influenced by the presence of optimal temperature and blood-meal and will therefore hatch faster if all these are present in good quantity.

The nymph then matures with its length of time dependent on temperature. The nymph highly demands frequent blood meals so as to nourish itself in between molts.

It will require 5 molts for complete maturity and this may take a month or even 21 days in temperatures that are warmer. Molting involves shedding of the outer exoskeleton so as to increase in size.

If the season is cold, then it might take as long as 2 or 4 months to mature. It is interesting to note that any adult male and female can mate regardless of maternal relations.

Adult bed bugs live for an average of about 2 or 4 months again depending on the prevailing temperatures and adequacy of a blood meal. The following is the change in size as the bed bug grows:

  1. Eggs (1mm).
  2. 1 st – 5 th stage nymph (1.5 – 4.5 mm).

How to kill/Get rid of bed bug eggs

Killing

Diatomaceous earth (DE):the use of DE is a natural method that kills bed bugs efficiently. It does so by absorbing the protective exoskeleton making it dehydrated and eventually dead within hours.

Heat Treatment:there are special heating equipment that are used to de-infest homes. The machines are portable and have fans that heat the adjacent air to as high as 120 – 130°F.

This is closely monitored with temperature sensors. This method is quite effective and has been shown to be able to eliminate bed bugs in a single day rather than a couple of days.

It is however an expensive method and at times may require that insecticides be used for bed bugs re-entering your dwelling.

Cold treatment:if bed bugs are exposed to freeze- cold temperatures for a long time, then you can kill them. Temperatures as low as -16°C for about 3 days are enough to put the infestations to a stop.

You can also choose to use this method to immobilize the bed bugs and stop them from spreading and growing while you dispose of the item.

Using encasements:this involves the use of a covering made of fabric and zipping a mattress in it. This majorly creates a barrier between the bed bugs and the surrounding preventing escape and spread.

This is a good way to contain infestations. This method may be used as an accompaniment after you have killed the bed bugs and have bought a new mattress too.

Use of interceptors:they are a good method since they prevent the bed bugs from climbing the bed. When the bed bugs try to climb the leg of the bed, they are trapped within the interceptor. They can also be a useful monitoring and evaluation tool.

Insecticides:call a professional to do this for you. It is not advisable for you to do it by yourself as the chemicals used require the use of protective attire.

There are a variety of chemicals that have been approved for use as an insecticide such asTransport®, Temprid®andPhantom®.

Use of insecticide does not entirely depend on the chemical used but also the ability to decipher places that are hot spots. Spray areas where the bed bugs hide such as crevices, cracks and inside joints of beds and other furniture.

After spraying the whole room take out the sheets and clothing then wash them in hot water to remove the chemicals. Fumigation is quite similar that is used to kill bed bugs with a lethal gas such as sulfuryl fluoride. This requires that you vacate the building for a couple of days(College of Agriculture, Food and Environment).

Other ways to get rid and prevent

Other ways that you can use to get rid and prevent bed bug infestations include:

  1. Examine your bedding and clothing frequently before your sleep and before travelling.
  2. Store your luggage on raised stands rather than placing them on the floor
  3. When you are from a visitation and bed bugs were evident, leave your bag outside and call bed bug professionals.

Add Comments: