How Bed Bugs Eggs Look Like

What Do Bed Bug Eggs Look Like?

Knowing what bed bug eggs look like could help you defeat an infestation faster—and help prevent the bugs from coming back.

Courtesy Dini M. Miller, Ph.D

A bed bug’s life starts as a tiny egg, barely noticeable to the human eye. But in just days, this tiny, blood-sucking insect will hatch and be searching for its next blood meal in you.

Don’t believe this myth about bed bug eggs

You may have already read on some websites that bed bugs can lay up to 500 eggs in a lifetime. That’s something to freak out about—if it were true. Thankfully, it’s not. Virginia Tech entomologist Dini M. Miller, PhD, says that number is from dated research but still circulates today. The reported 500 eggs were based on one bed bug in a lab that was very fertile. Here’s something you can believe—the real causes of bed bugs.

How many eggs do bed bugs lay?

Dr. Dini Millers’ research lab at Virginia Tech says the more meals the female gets, the greater the number of eggs she will produce. So, if she is able to feed every week, she could produce five to 20 eggs. But she might not get to feed every week, in which case she would produce fewer eggs. According to Dr. Miller’s research, bed bugs can lay up to 113 eggs in a lifetime, which can be around a year.

Male bed bugs get frisky after a blood meal

After female and male bed bugs get their fill of blood from you, they head back to the harborage (their home) to digest their blood feast and mate. Dr. Miller’s research tells us male bed bugs are particularly interested in mating after a blood meal. Afterward and for the next several hours, their sperm will migrate to the female’s ovaries and fertilize her eggs. Check out what bed bugs look like after they eat and when they mate.

Bed bug eggs are dropped

Courtesy Dini M. Miller, Ph.D

Bed bug eggs are cream-colored and have an elongated shape that measures a tiny one millimeter in length. The female can lay her eggs singly or in groups. “Bed bugs can ‘glue’ their egg to a surface and it can remain there until it hatches if in an undisturbed location such as a crack or crevice. They can be dislodged though, so they can be found on the floor if scraped off,” says urban entomologist Jody Green, PhD, at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. The eggs are usually pretty safe unless a human comes along with a scraper or strong vacuum to suck them up. Vacuuming is one way to stay on top of bed bugs. Here are some other things you should be doing to keep bed bugs out.

Bed bug eggs are tough

You would think something as small and seemingly frail like a bed bug egg wouldn’t have much of a chance, yet Dr. Miller’s research says that under optimal conditions, just about 97 percent of the bed bug eggs hatch. Insecticides sold at the local hardware store can’t penetrate the protective eggshell, says Green. Even diatomaceous earth, one of the home remedies for bed bugs, only kills nymphs and adult bed bugs—not the eggs. Here’s what’s lethal to the eggs: Temperatures above 120 degrees, or below 0. Green says some professional products may be successful at wiping out the eggs but only with precise and proper application techniques.

Hatching time

A new generation of bed bugs will hatch between nine and 12 days of optimal room temperatures—around 72 degrees—Green says. Hatching takes longer under cooler conditions. Once the nymphs emerge, they immediately start searching for a blood meal. “Literature has suggested that nymphs require a blood meal soon because they may desiccate. A blood meal will help them with moisture, but they can also survive by hiding out in crevices in optimal temperatures of 70 to 90 degrees,” says Green. Even without a blood snack, nymphs may live for two to four months. Check out some more secrets bed bugs don’t want you to know.

What do bed bug eggs look like?

Bed bugs are ectoparasites that feed on the blood from a host animal. Unfortunately, these disturbing pests’ animal of choice is a human. In order to produce bed bug eggs, the female must first have a blood meal. After this blood meal, a female bed bug is capable of laying large numbers of eggs. With continued access to blood, she can lay as many as 500 to 600 eggs in her lifetime. If you are concerned about bed bugs in your home, there are two questions you might be asking yourself: “What do bed bug eggs look like?” and “Where do bed bugs lay eggs?” Let’s examine the answers to each.

Physical appearance of bed bug eggs

What do bed bug eggs look like? They are very small and white to pearl-white in color. They appear to be shaped like a barrel and are about the size of a pinhead or a grain of salt. They are covered with a sticky substance, which adheres to almost any surface the female places them on. If the eggs are more than five days old, they will have a conspicuous dark mark on them that resembles an eye.

Common areas where bed bug eggs are found

Where do bed bugs lay eggs? Once inside a structure, bed bugs do not travel far to feed or lay their eggs. Most eggs are laid in protected sites, as close to a food source as possible. These pests can fit into a crack no thicker than a business card and lay eggs.

Bed bugs feed most often at night while the host animal is at rest. Since they primarily feed on the blood of humans, the most likely place to find bed bug eggs is on or near the bed. Look closely for bed bug eggs on mattress seams and joints. It’s also common to find them on the box spring and behind the headboard, if it abuts or is attached to the wall. Near these sites you will most likely find markings of red or black “specks.” These markings are feces from the bed bugs that consist of partially digested blood. Large concentrations of bed bugs may be accompanied by a pungent, sweetish odor caused by secretions from their scent glands.

Although it has not been proven that these disgusting creatures transmit diseases to humans, just the thought of having a bed bug infestation in your home sucking your blood is enough to make your skin crawl. Take the worry out of trying to identify bed bug eggs and trying to find where they might be located in your home. Call the pest management professionals at Terminix® for a free bed bug inspection today. They know how to locate bed bugs and eliminate them.

Everything you need to know about bedbugs

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Bedbugs are small, wingless insects that feed exclusively on the blood of warm-blooded animals. Humans are the preferred hosts for the two main species.

There are two species of bedbugs that are known to feed on human blood. They are known scientifically asCimex lectulariusandCimex hemipterus. They have been found in the tombs of ancient Egyptians from 3,500 years ago.

Over millions of years, bedbugs have evolved as nest parasites, inhabiting the nests of birds and the roosts of bats. Some of them have learned to adapt to the human environment.

Newborn bedbugs, called hatchlings or nymphs, are tiny but visible and about the size of a poppy seed. Adults grow to about 0.25 inches long with an oval and flattened shape when they are not feeding. After feeding, they can double in size. Nymphs, eggs, and adults are visible to the naked eye.

They are called bedbugs because of their preferred habitat in human homes: Sofas, bed mattresses, clothing, and other soft furnishings. They also prefer the dark.

Bedbugs are seen as a growing problem within all types of dwellings, including private homes, dormitories, cruise ships, army barracks, and shelters.

When seen close up, their color may range from a white, light tan to a deep brown or burnt orange color. When they have fed, a dark red or black blob may be observed within their body. They seek shelter in dark cracks and crevices when disturbed.

Fast facts on bedbugs

  • Bedbugs are small wingless insects that feed on the blood of warm-blooded animals.
  • Most bedbugs feed on their hosts while they are asleep.
  • The peak time for feeding is between midnight and 5 am.
  • Bites can be seen quickly but may take up to 14 days to become visible.
  • Bed bugs need to feed regularly to reproduce, lay eggs and survive.

Share on Pinterest A bedbug may cause a coriander-like smell.

The most obvious sign of bedbugs in the home is that people complain of bites that occurred while they were asleep. If this happens, examine the bedrooms for bedbugs and signs of bedbug activity.

Look carefully in bed linen and the seams and tufts of mattresses and box springs for bugs or eggs. The eggs will look like tiny, pale poppy seeds.

Signs of bedbug activity may occur beneath loose areas of wallpaper near beds, in the corner of desks and dressers, in the laundry, and in drawers.

Keep an eye out for dark brown or rust-colored bedbug droppings that stain material and mattresses. Bedbug excrement is a liquid that looks either light brown or black, and it usually either beads up or is absorbed by the material around it.

A large population of bedbugs may produce a coriander-like odor.

Treatment focuses on relieving symptoms and includes:

  • topical creams, such as cortisone, to relieve itching
  • an oral antibiotic, if infection occurs because of skin irritation around the bite
  • corticosteroids, if a person has a severe allergic reaction
  • antihistamines, to help relieve allergic reactions

Most bites heal within 1 and 2 weeks of occurrence.

Some of these treatments are available for purchase online, including cortisone and antihistamines.

Since bedbugs can hide in a wide range of places in the home, they are not easy to remove. It is advisable to bring in a pest control professional.

Removing excess clutter from the house, giving the bedbugs fewer places to hide, makes inspection and removal less difficult.

Some pest control companies request that furniture is pulled away from walls and mattresses and box springs stood on edge before they enter the home. Other companies prefer everything to be left where it is so that they can perform a check before moving the furniture themselves.

Scientists at Ohio State University have determined that combining the chemical signals of bedbugs with a common insect-control agent can make it an effective treatment for killing the bugs.

Most bedbugs feed on their hosts while they sleep. They draw blood in a painless way.

While feeding, they inject a small amount of saliva into the host’s skin. If they feed on one particular person for several weeks, the individual may become more sensitive to their saliva and the chemicals that it contains. The host might eventually develop an allergic response.

Bedbugs, like fleas, tend to bite in rows. There are likely to be two or three bites in each row. This is probably because the bedbug is interrupted while feeding, and then comes back about half an inch further down for its next bite.

Bites can take up to 14 days to become visible but often appear within several days. Bedbug bites are larger than fleabites and do not usually have a red dot at the center. The bites tend to be raised and red.

They can be scattered or occur in clusters of three over the paths of blood vessels, known as the “breakfast, lunch, and dinner sign.”

Most people who are bitten show no symptoms at all and often do not know it happened. This makes it more difficult to prevent or identify potential infestations. Some individuals, however, may become ill and nauseous. It is possible to get scars and skin infections from scratching the bites.

Very rarely, people might have an anaphylactic reaction to bedbug bites. It is possible but rare to have an asthmatic reaction to bedbugs.

Bedbugs are adaptable, and there are many ways in which a bedbug infestation can occur.

They may get into a new home as stowaways when luggage, furniture, and bedding is moved in. People should be careful when purchasing second-hand furniture and should never purchase used mattresses. A careful visual inspection should allow a person to detect bedbugs or their droppings.

Even vacant and seemingly clean homes may have bedbugs in them. They can survive for over two months without any food. It is also believed they can move from apartment to apartment through hollows and holes in the walls and the tubes through which wires and pipes run.

Bedbug infestations can be difficult to prevent.

It is possible to encase both the mattress and box spring in a protective cover, as some people do for allergy relief. Some pest control firms sell them, as well as a number of retail outlets. Click here for a range of products that can help to protect a bed against infestation.

Once encased, any bedbug trapped inside and prevented from feeding will eventually die. Some people keep their new beds encased, as it prevents the bugs from getting into the crevices in the mattress and makes it easier to keep the surface clean and bug-free.

When traveling, avoid putting luggage on the bed to reduce the risk of bringing bedbugs home in a suitcase. It is also worth vacuuming any luggage after you return home and making sure you get rid of the contents of the vacuum in a tightly sealed bag. Dispose of this bag in a trashcan outside.

Separate travel clothes from laundry and immediately wash them in hot water.

If you spot bedbugs in the home, call a professional and do not attempt to resolve the infestation. Bedbugs can spread from room to room in clothing, and trying to remove them yourself can often make the matter worse.

Although they are not known to carry diseases, bedbugs can affect an individual’s quality of life, causing distress, discomfort, embarrassment, and broken sleep.

Here are the important facts to have in mind when trying to remove or identify a bedbug infestation:

  • The peak time for feeding is between midnight and 5 AM. Hungry bedbugs will try to feed at any time, but they do not like sunlight and prefer the dark. One feed will take between 5 and 10 minutes. The bug will then return to its hiding place.
  • Bedbugs will feed every 5 to 10 days. They can, however, last for about 70 days without feeding. A well-fed bedbug has a lifespan of several months.
  • They find their host by seeking out human body heat and sensing the presence of the carbon dioxide on the breath.
  • A bedbug will pierce the skin of its host with its mouth part. It first injects saliva that is a mixture of an anesthetic, so that the host feels nothing, and an anticoagulant so that the blood flows out freely. It then sucks out blood until it is full. The bites are not noticeable until after the skin reaction has occurred. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), it can take up to 14 days for bites to appear.
  • Bedbugs can only reproduce when they have reached maturity. A female bedbug lays approximately seven eggs in a day and hundreds during her lifetime.

A review of bedbug research conducted in 2016 found that while they are highly resistant to removal methods, bedbugs seem to be more of a nuisance than a serious health problem. Research has failed to show any link between the bedbugs associated with humans and human disease.

The biggest risk for humans comes from secondary bacterial infection. With bedbugs, this would occur as a result of scratching the skin. Scratching, if it breaks the skin, allows normal bacteria from the surface of the skin to penetrate deeper.

The source of any bacterial infection is, therefore, the human host and not the bedbug.

Identifying Bed Bug Eggs- How they look like, Images & destruction

Identifying bed bugs and their eggs comes in handy in not only differentiating between it and other household insects but also ensuring that you mount an appropriate response to them.

This might seem like a simple task but there has been a campaign that has debunked this.

In one campaign by the University of Minnesota, it was found out that many people couldn’t identify with a bed bug.

In its findings, it was shown that 76% of all the samples that had been submitted for identification were indeed not bed bugs. Now, if this was hard enough, then how about identifying bed bug eggs themselves? Read on to find out.

What do bed bug eggs look like- Color & Shells

After bed bugs have mated, the female is expected to lay eggs. The eggs are oval in shape and normally white in color. The size of the egg is approximately 1/32″ or 1/16″ long.

This size is typically smaller than a grain of rice but a rice grain is almost 50 times smaller. There have been propositions mentioning the efficacy of using a light-emitting diode (LED) to be able to shine on the eggs and make it easier for identification and observation.

One thing that you should know is that the eggs are so tiny that you wouldn’t necessarily see them with your naked eye. You will need to magnify their sizes with the use of a magnifying glass. This might still take you some time if you are looking for the eggs in a light-colored wall.

White wall are known as the biggest culprits and hide the eggs even from a magnifying glass. This is where your vision acuity comes in. Further magnification of the egg reveals that it is not all white but rather a conformity of a silvery and cream-colored appearance.

An unhatched egg has the cream-colored appearance while a hatched egg is silvery. The latter is basically a remnant of the shell of the egg.

In a dark colored setting, the eggs can be very visible to the naked eye and this might mean that the blocks are basically clusters of many eggs clutched together to form one big rice-grain-sized egg. In real sense, it is not however.

In regards to the shape, the egg is more ovoid or at times oblong. One end is marked by an eye spot that can be seen as a slightly dark mark.

It is important to be able to differentiate the fecal matter, eggs and egg shells of bed bugs. Well, as you might expect, the fecal matter is quite the opposite color of the eggs. They are dark in colour and can also be seen on the sidelines of mattresses or along the corners of your wall.

Are Bed Bug Eggs Hard-how do the feel like?

You might wonder why this question is of essence in discussions but they may as well point out to perhaps someone wanting to crush them, ease of removal from household items without squashing onto them or mere curiosity.

If you have bed bugs, you can feel them and determine their fragility. At first instance, you need to ensure that the eggs you are touching are indeed a bed-bug’s. You wouldn’t of course feel these very tiny eggs even when your mattress is heavily laden by them.

While there is not any defined texture that is associated with bed bug eggs, at least information from hear-say has established that bed bug eggs are soft and since they are too small, the feeling is like rubbing some dust through your fingers.

However, you can actually feel some bit of grittiness depicting some rounded content suggestive of eggs. Perhaps the reason as to why some people say the eggs are hard is due to the fact that the eggs are strongly adherent to the item they have been laid on.

Bed Bug Eggs, Shells Pictures & images

Egg shells

How many eggs do bed bugs lay-Where & How Often

Bed bugs are like egg-laying machines. An adult female bed bug lays about 2-3 eggs or at times even more in a day. This means that the bed bug may lay hundreds of eggs in its lifetime.

This has been stipulated to be between 200 and 250 eggs. The number of eggs laid per day will be dependent on the presence of optimal conditions that are required to lay eggs.

These eggs can be laid either in clusters or singly and therefore may be associated with a small time difference between subsequent laying.

This includes warm temperatures and enough blood-meal in a day. It is also known that a single female can be responsible for more than 4000 bed bugs within a span of f6 months.

When and where do bed bugs lay eggs

Bed bugs have a pre-determined specification of the place it can lay its eggs. They are bright and since danger poses when the eggs are visible, wit is often required.

Fortunately, many people already know about this. Owing to the color of the eggs, they are mostly deposited on the wall especially the white or cream-colored ones. They may be engraved in the crevices or cracks on wall and the corners of the walls.

They are commonly seen as a line of white tiny balls along the corner from the top to bottom. So long as an area is well protected, it serves as a potential hiding spot for the eggs. These are areas rarely accessed by anyone and therefore good for the wellbeing of the unhatched eggs.

In addition, the places need not obey the law of gravity as these eggs are highly adherent to the places they have been laid on.

Folds and seams of mattresses, box springs, frames of beds and plywood are potential places.

If you can take a look at your bed at its joints and even dismantle the bed itself, you will meet hundreds of eggs lodged.

You will find that there has been a history of hatching and laying cycles with shells visible and skins of a couple of nymphs already molted.

Bed bugs can also lay their eggs on you whether on your clothes or on parts that resemble a crevice or a hiding spot such as the folds of your abdomen or under-arm.

Whether they hatch on you is dependent on your level of hygiene. If your hygiene is poor, then you will definitely be one of the best nesting spots of bed bugs.

The time they lay

Bed bugs lay eggs at any time of the day. This depends on the responsible mating time.

However, some other factors may have an impact on the time the female chooses to lay. This school of thought is sparked by the fact that the eggs are normally found in designated places. This means that the location is an important determiner.

Life cycle-how long does it take bed bug eggs to hatch

After laying the eggs, it will take approximately 6 to 17 days for the eggs to get hatched. It is during this time that the new bed bug, nymph, seeks its first meal.

The range of time it takes for the eggs to hatch is influenced by the presence of optimal temperature and blood-meal and will therefore hatch faster if all these are present in good quantity.

The nymph then matures with its length of time dependent on temperature. The nymph highly demands frequent blood meals so as to nourish itself in between molts.

It will require 5 molts for complete maturity and this may take a month or even 21 days in temperatures that are warmer. Molting involves shedding of the outer exoskeleton so as to increase in size.

If the season is cold, then it might take as long as 2 or 4 months to mature. It is interesting to note that any adult male and female can mate regardless of maternal relations.

Adult bed bugs live for an average of about 2 or 4 months again depending on the prevailing temperatures and adequacy of a blood meal. The following is the change in size as the bed bug grows:

  1. Eggs (1mm).
  2. 1 st – 5 th stage nymph (1.5 – 4.5 mm).

How to kill/Get rid of bed bug eggs

Killing

Diatomaceous earth (DE):the use of DE is a natural method that kills bed bugs efficiently. It does so by absorbing the protective exoskeleton making it dehydrated and eventually dead within hours.

Heat Treatment:there are special heating equipment that are used to de-infest homes. The machines are portable and have fans that heat the adjacent air to as high as 120 – 130°F.

This is closely monitored with temperature sensors. This method is quite effective and has been shown to be able to eliminate bed bugs in a single day rather than a couple of days.

It is however an expensive method and at times may require that insecticides be used for bed bugs re-entering your dwelling.

Cold treatment:if bed bugs are exposed to freeze- cold temperatures for a long time, then you can kill them. Temperatures as low as -16°C for about 3 days are enough to put the infestations to a stop.

You can also choose to use this method to immobilize the bed bugs and stop them from spreading and growing while you dispose of the item.

Using encasements:this involves the use of a covering made of fabric and zipping a mattress in it. This majorly creates a barrier between the bed bugs and the surrounding preventing escape and spread.

This is a good way to contain infestations. This method may be used as an accompaniment after you have killed the bed bugs and have bought a new mattress too.

Use of interceptors:they are a good method since they prevent the bed bugs from climbing the bed. When the bed bugs try to climb the leg of the bed, they are trapped within the interceptor. They can also be a useful monitoring and evaluation tool.

Insecticides:call a professional to do this for you. It is not advisable for you to do it by yourself as the chemicals used require the use of protective attire.

There are a variety of chemicals that have been approved for use as an insecticide such asTransport®, Temprid®andPhantom®.

Use of insecticide does not entirely depend on the chemical used but also the ability to decipher places that are hot spots. Spray areas where the bed bugs hide such as crevices, cracks and inside joints of beds and other furniture.

After spraying the whole room take out the sheets and clothing then wash them in hot water to remove the chemicals. Fumigation is quite similar that is used to kill bed bugs with a lethal gas such as sulfuryl fluoride. This requires that you vacate the building for a couple of days(College of Agriculture, Food and Environment).

Other ways to get rid and prevent

Other ways that you can use to get rid and prevent bed bug infestations include:

  1. Examine your bedding and clothing frequently before your sleep and before travelling.
  2. Store your luggage on raised stands rather than placing them on the floor
  3. When you are from a visitation and bed bugs were evident, leave your bag outside and call bed bug professionals.

Signs of Bed Bugs

Here you’ll find pictures of signs of bed bugs like eggs, fecal stains and cast skins on mattresses, different types of furniture and other hiding places. Whether you think you might have bed bugs or want to make sure you avoid bringing them home, these photos give you a good idea of what to look for and where to look.

Looking for something in particular?This page is pretty long, so these links will take you straight to the sections you most want to see.

Blood Smears and Fecal Stains

Smears of blood on sheets are one of the early warning signs that bed bugsmightbe sharing your bed.Stains like the ones in the picture below happen when recently fed bugs get squashed in the bed by a person moving unexpectedly.But, many other things could cause stains like this.For this reason, blood stains alone arenotevidence of a bed bug infestation.

If you are being bitten by bed bugs, you will also see fecal stains.

Fecal stains on sheets look like the marks of a felt tip pen and tend to bleed into the fabric. The picture below is a great example of what bed bug fecal stains look like. Note the live bed bugs in the photo and how flat they are.

Pictures of Bed Bug Infestions on Beds

The photo below shows evidence of bed bug infestation on the side of a mattress. In this view mostly just spots and a few adult bugs are visible.

The picture below is a closeup of the same mattress. Here it’s apparent that there are live adults and nymphs (bed bug babies) as well as fecal stains – but can you pick out the eggs?

Now look at this magnified view. See how closely the eggs resemble the shiny white fibers of the mattress fabric?

Bed Bugs Hiding in plain sight!

This set of pictures is a great example of how bed bugs easily "hide in plain sight". Take a close look at the picture in the upper right corner of the collage. See any bed bugs? If you found a couple – that’s not bad.

Now look at the at the picture to the upper left. See all the beige colored spots especially around the open grommet hole? Those are baby bed bugs (nymphs) and there are a lot of them!

Even more surprising is the lower-right magnified view of a grommet hole (above) that is completely filled with nymphs and their cast skins. That same hole is located on the right edge of the upper-right image you looked at first.

Box springs are actually the #1 bed bug hiding spotaccording to a study of 13 infested apartments conducted by the University of Kentucky Department of Entomology. (Read more about where bed bugs hide and the results of the study.)

As the pictures below demonstrate, you’ll typically find more signs of bed bugs at the head of the bed (left image) than at the foot (right image).

Headboards and bed frames are also favorite hangouts for bed bugs. The photo below shows signs of bed bugs living in the decorative groove of a wood headboard.

Bed bugs are freakishly flat and can squeeze themselves into the most unlikely places. Notice howa bunch of themhave piled into this gouge in a bed frame.

Special thanks to Lou Sorkin, entomologist at the American Museum of Natural History for such a large selection of helpful pics. All of the images of bed bugs on furniture in this block as well as many of the photos throughout the site are Lou’s, and are used with permission via Creative Commons licenses, unless otherwise noted.

Signs of Bed Bugs in Other Furniture

These two pictures show multiple signs and symptoms of bed bug infestation on an upholstered chair. Note how the nymphs and eggs are clustered right in the seam area in the photo below. In fact, at first glance the eggs might be mistaken for dust or other fibers.

This photo on the right shows signs of much heavier infestation, including cast skins, fecal droppings and many eggs on theundersideof the chair upholstery – something to keep in mind when you are checking for bed bugs.

Bed Bugs can also be found on and inside wood furniture like night stands, dressers and book shelves. They like the cracks and crevices of joints between pieces of wood and can even be found in screw holes. The two pictures below show evidence of bed bugs on a wooden shelving unit. The little white spots on the side of the shelf are eggs, the beige spots are bedbug nymphs and the black dots are fecal matter. The bigger bug in the picture on the right is a German cockroach.

Bed bugs can also hide on almost any other type of surface including metal and plastic. The photo on the right below shows how a number of bed bugs found harborage together inside a the head of screw.

All of the photos of bugs above are also from Lou Sorkin’s vast collection of bed bug photos .

Bed Bug Cast Skins/Shells

As bed bugs grow from birth to adulthood , they molt, or shed their exoskeletons. The cast skins (bedbug shells) they leave behind can be found in and around their harborages (hideouts) and are definite signs of a growing bed bug population.

The photo above shows two cast skins in the upper left corner along with a live bed bug and fecal stain.

The image below is a bowl full of shed skins or exoskeletons. Yuck!

More Signs of Bed Bug Infestation – Eggs and Fecal Droppings

Here are some close-up pics of bed bug excrement and bed bug eggs. While the fecal stains on sheets at the top of the page look like back marker stains, the droppings themselves look like little black blobs.

Note how the the hatched eggs in the picture on the above look dull, dried out and flattened compared to the unhatched eggs.

Bedbug eggs are often found on wood, cardboard and fabric. They are covered in a sticky glue-like substance which helps them stick to the surfaces and gives them a shiny appearance.

Credit (all 3 photos above): Dr. Harold Harlan of the Armed Forces Pest Management Board (CC).

Signs of Bed Bugs in Other Places

Typically, bed bugs hide out close to their source of food (see top 8 hiding spots). But, as infestations grow, bed bugs tend to spread out from the immediate vicinity of their feeding area. While they are not feeding, they will hide out in a wide variety of places. They’re super flat, so they can squeeze themselves in to very tight spots like picture frames, electrical outlets, carpet edges and behind window/door moldings and baseboards.

Signs of bed bugs on a door hinge.

And behind rubber baseboard molding.

Photos credit for collection of photos above: Lou Sorkin (CC)

Learn How to Inspect for Bed Bugs in your home or hotel

Hopefully, these pictures of signs of bed bugs help you have a better idea of what to look when checking for a bed bug infestation.

If you think you may have bed bugs, it’s time to get down and dirty. But before you do, check out our handy step-by-step inspection instructions in the bed bug detection section.

If you haven’t already done so, its a good idea to get familiar with what bedbugs look like in all of their life stages. Once you’re done here, I also recommend learning more about all 9 signs of bed bug infestation, where they like to hide, and how to look for them.

More Bed Bug Photo Collections

  • Pictures of Adult Bed Bugs
  • Bed Bugs on Humans and Common Objects (size comparisons)
  • Bed Bugs vs Other Insects
  • Pictures of Bedbugs Feeding
  • Pictures of Bed Bug Bites

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