How Bed Bugs Poop

Bed Bug Feces: Everything You Didn’t Want to Know

Bed bugs are notoriously hard to spot. Many victims have a hard time confirming whether or not they have a bed bug infestation. Bed bug bites don’t always leave marks, and when they do the marks are often mixed up with spider bites or skin rashes. But if there’s one thing that’s certain, it’s that everybody poops — even bed bugs.

Bed bugs live, grow, and reproduce by feeding on mammal blood. Each bug feeds every 5-10 days, biting multiple times and using an anesthetic in their saliva to numb the pain. Some times, bed bugs begin dropping feces from earlier blood meals just after they’ve finished feeding. Bed bug feces are left behind as the bug flees for a nearby hiding place.

If you find a dark spot or streak on your bedding, you might be worried that it’s from a bed bug. You may also be concerned that the feces left on your bed can get you sick. But how can you be sure that you’ve found bed bug feces? And what are the feces doing for your health? Let’s dig in and learn what we need to know… even though we don’t want to know.

Identifying Bed Bug Feces

One of the most reliable ways to confirm a bed bug infestation is to find and possitively identify bed bug feces. But since the fecal matter can look similar to other types of markings, it’s important that you be sure of what you found.

Bed bugs leave their feces everywhere, from pillowcases and sheets to sofa cushions, baseboards, and outlets. Bed bug poop is made up of digested blood. When wet, it’s still dark red like blood would be. When it dries, the mark turns into a very dark rust shade, and will usually appear black in most lighting.

Like many animals, bed bugs poop while they walk. It’s gross, but it’s efficient when you’re constantly on the move in the wild. Since bed bugs walk with their bodies flat and close to the ground, their droppings tend to drag along their tail on release. This results in bed bug feces looking more like thin, black streaks rather than what we would consider characteristic of poop.

Not sure if that black smudge, spot, or streak is from a bed bug or not? A reliable way to confirm that a mark is made of bed bug fecal matter is to dab it with a wet cloth or paper towel. Bed bug feces will smudge when wiped, and the previously black mark will stain red when wet. While the red color may not appear on the surface that the fecal matter was found on, it should show up on the damp cloth that you used.

Can Bed Bug Feces Impact Your Health?

A common concern when finding bed bug feces is wondering what effects it might be having on your health. While the exact health impact of a bed bug’s fecal matter is still uncertain, recent studies have pinned down certain chemicals in the feces, and it’s not all rosey:

Bed bug feces contain histamine, a component of their aggregation pheromone. Histamine is released from bed bug fecal matter along with the pheromones released when bed bugs are congregating. This is where the “sweet” odor comes from in a heavily infested area.

While humans naturally release histamine in response to an allergic reaction, it can ironically trigger allergy symptoms when we come in contact with it in our environment. People exposed to histamine may experience itching or asthma symptoms.

A study published in 2018 found that dust collected from homes with prior bed bug infestations had much higher histamine levels than dust from bed bug-free households. Long after the bugs are gone, the histamine released from their poop lingers in a home. It’s possible that the remaining histamine can still trigger symptoms in the same way that other exposures to histamine can.

Fecal Stains During Bed Bug Treatments

Inspecting for bed bug feces plays a critical role before, during, and after your bed bug treatment. Now that you know what bed bug feces looks like, it’s important to integrate it into your treatment routine.

First, bed bug droppings are a key way of identifying bed bug activity. Since droppings are released after bed bugs feed, and are left in the path of their escape from a host, you’ll find them near where they were feeding as well as where they went to hide afterwards. A positive identification of bed bug feces can also help confirm if you have a bed bug infestation if you weren’t sure yet.

An important part of your bed bug treatment, and one we focus heavily with our 4-step solution, is treating and isolating where you sleep to prevent feeding. Bed bugs need to feed in order to mature and reproduce, so cutting off this cycle is essential to getting rid of bed bugs for good. With that in mind, you’ll need to keep an eye out for new bed bug feces after you’ve treated, encased, and isolated your bed.

If you do find new fecal streaks even after isolating your bed, it’s a sign that bed bugs have been feeding despite your efforts to prevent their access to a meal. This means that the bugs can continue to develop and lay eggs once they’re sexually mature, so it’s important to address how they’re still able to feed. Go over every potential access point, such as any part of the bed still touching the walls, floor, or other nearby furniture. Check that ClimbUp Interceptors are installed properly under every leg of the bed, and that encasements are securely enclosed around the mattress and box spring. As long as the bed is fully treated, encased, and isolated, there shouldn’t be any more poop popping up.

Bed Bug Feces: Everything You Didn’t Want to Know

Bed bugs are notoriously hard to spot. Many victims have a hard time confirming whether or not they have a bed bug infestation. Bed bug bites don’t always leave marks, and when they do the marks are often mixed up with spider bites or skin rashes. But if there’s one thing that’s certain, it’s that everybody poops — even bed bugs.

Bed bugs live, grow, and reproduce by feeding on mammal blood. Each bug feeds every 5-10 days, biting multiple times and using an anesthetic in their saliva to numb the pain. Some times, bed bugs begin dropping feces from earlier blood meals just after they’ve finished feeding. Bed bug feces are left behind as the bug flees for a nearby hiding place.

If you find a dark spot or streak on your bedding, you might be worried that it’s from a bed bug. You may also be concerned that the feces left on your bed can get you sick. But how can you be sure that you’ve found bed bug feces? And what are the feces doing for your health? Let’s dig in and learn what we need to know… even though we don’t want to know.

Identifying Bed Bug Feces

One of the most reliable ways to confirm a bed bug infestation is to find and possitively identify bed bug feces. But since the fecal matter can look similar to other types of markings, it’s important that you be sure of what you found.

Bed bugs leave their feces everywhere, from pillowcases and sheets to sofa cushions, baseboards, and outlets. Bed bug poop is made up of digested blood. When wet, it’s still dark red like blood would be. When it dries, the mark turns into a very dark rust shade, and will usually appear black in most lighting.

Like many animals, bed bugs poop while they walk. It’s gross, but it’s efficient when you’re constantly on the move in the wild. Since bed bugs walk with their bodies flat and close to the ground, their droppings tend to drag along their tail on release. This results in bed bug feces looking more like thin, black streaks rather than what we would consider characteristic of poop.

Not sure if that black smudge, spot, or streak is from a bed bug or not? A reliable way to confirm that a mark is made of bed bug fecal matter is to dab it with a wet cloth or paper towel. Bed bug feces will smudge when wiped, and the previously black mark will stain red when wet. While the red color may not appear on the surface that the fecal matter was found on, it should show up on the damp cloth that you used.

Can Bed Bug Feces Impact Your Health?

A common concern when finding bed bug feces is wondering what effects it might be having on your health. While the exact health impact of a bed bug’s fecal matter is still uncertain, recent studies have pinned down certain chemicals in the feces, and it’s not all rosey:

Bed bug feces contain histamine, a component of their aggregation pheromone. Histamine is released from bed bug fecal matter along with the pheromones released when bed bugs are congregating. This is where the “sweet” odor comes from in a heavily infested area.

While humans naturally release histamine in response to an allergic reaction, it can ironically trigger allergy symptoms when we come in contact with it in our environment. People exposed to histamine may experience itching or asthma symptoms.

A study published in 2018 found that dust collected from homes with prior bed bug infestations had much higher histamine levels than dust from bed bug-free households. Long after the bugs are gone, the histamine released from their poop lingers in a home. It’s possible that the remaining histamine can still trigger symptoms in the same way that other exposures to histamine can.

Fecal Stains During Bed Bug Treatments

Inspecting for bed bug feces plays a critical role before, during, and after your bed bug treatment. Now that you know what bed bug feces looks like, it’s important to integrate it into your treatment routine.

First, bed bug droppings are a key way of identifying bed bug activity. Since droppings are released after bed bugs feed, and are left in the path of their escape from a host, you’ll find them near where they were feeding as well as where they went to hide afterwards. A positive identification of bed bug feces can also help confirm if you have a bed bug infestation if you weren’t sure yet.

An important part of your bed bug treatment, and one we focus heavily with our 4-step solution, is treating and isolating where you sleep to prevent feeding. Bed bugs need to feed in order to mature and reproduce, so cutting off this cycle is essential to getting rid of bed bugs for good. With that in mind, you’ll need to keep an eye out for new bed bug feces after you’ve treated, encased, and isolated your bed.

If you do find new fecal streaks even after isolating your bed, it’s a sign that bed bugs have been feeding despite your efforts to prevent their access to a meal. This means that the bugs can continue to develop and lay eggs once they’re sexually mature, so it’s important to address how they’re still able to feed. Go over every potential access point, such as any part of the bed still touching the walls, floor, or other nearby furniture. Check that ClimbUp Interceptors are installed properly under every leg of the bed, and that encasements are securely enclosed around the mattress and box spring. As long as the bed is fully treated, encased, and isolated, there shouldn’t be any more poop popping up.

Bed Bug Feces

After a blood meal, bed bugs often aggregate together in clusters around the room including along the seams of mattresses, along the edges of carpets, furniture, inside walls and other cracks and crevices. While hiding in these clusters, bed bugs accumulate fecal matter, leftover bed bug skins and live or hatched eggs. These clusters, once developed, are easy to spot making identification of an infestation more obvious. Bed bug fecal matter is dark in color made up of digested blood from their host. Bed bug feces is smooth to the touch unlike roach feces, which is more granular in feel. The fecal matter is easy to smear and can quickly stain mattresses, sheets, drapes, furniture, sofas and chairs. Below are some bed bug feces pictures.

Below: (Bed bugs and their feces inside a television stand)

Below: (Close-up of bed bugs and their fecal matter along the edges of carpet)

Below: (Close-up of bed bugs and smeared bed bug feces along the seams of a mattress)

A hot spot for finding bed bugs and bed bug feces is along the seams of the mattress. The seams and tufts of a mattress provide an ideal hiding spot for bed bugs to thrive and wait for their next blood meal. This is another reason why certified bed bug encasements are so important during treatment and for prevention (encasements help remove cracks and crevices on and in mattress and box springs). As illustrated in the picture, the fecal matter left behind by bed bugs can easily smear leaving behind dark marks on whatever it comes in contact with.

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What do Bed Bug Droppings Look Like?

While bed bugs may seem like an invisible threat, they do leave behind signs of their presence, mainly in the form of their droppings. Learn more.

Bed bugs can sometimes seem like an invisible threat. They hide all day, emerge briefly to feed on their host in the dead of night and then disappear again. Their bites can be difficult to identify, and depending on your sensitivity to them, they may not show up on your skin at all.

However, bed bugs do leave behind signs of their presence in the form of droppings. Being able to identify these is a step in the right direction to recognizing a bed bug infestation.

After bed bugs feed, they’ll leave behind droppings of your partially digested blood. These droppings could indicate that you have been bitten in your sleep, though by no means offer definitive proof. Bed bug poop appears as clusters of tiny spots on your bed. The droppings consist of digested blood, so they will no longer be red once they dry. The spots will be darker, rust colored or black, and are about the size of a dot from a marker.

If you think you may have a bed bug infestation, check for bed bug droppings around the corners and edges of your bed. This includes under the sheets and in the creases of the mattress. Bed bug droppings are not exclusive to just the bed, however. In a heavily infested room, they can show up on the carpet, behind the headboard, along the edges of the wall and anywhere else bed bugs are known to hide. If you suspect an infestation, be sure to check all these places thoroughly for stains.

Identifying these droppings can also keep you from inadvertently bringing bed bugs into your home. Any time you buy something second-hand, whether it’s furniture or clothing, check the item carefully for telltale stains of bed bug droppings. Bed bugs can travel on these items, allowing them to infiltrate your home. If you find any sign of their presence, do not bring the item inside.

Though identifying these stains is a good indication you may have a bed bug infestation, it’s not definitive proof. Seeing an actual living bed bug is the only way to be certain, and that can be more difficult. This is where a professional can assist in inspecting your home and identifying whether bed bugs are present.

Call Terminix® today to get the help you need in diagnosing a bed bug problem and taking the steps needed to rid your home of these pests.

Do Earwigs Bite?

If you shudder a little when you think about earwigs, you’re probably not alone. They’ve developed quite a nasty reputation, thanks to urban legends (mostly false) that have been circulating for years. But are they harmful?

The Lifespans of Insects With Short Lives

Many insects, such as butterflies, have a lifespan that occurs in four stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult. Other insects, such as grasshoppers, do not have a pupal stage and instead go through three stages: egg, nymph, and adult. The length of each stage can vary based on many things, from the insect species to the temperature outside—but what some insects share in common is a very short adult stage. Keep reading to learn about five insects with some of the shortest adult stages in their lifespan.

The Return of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

The change of seasons from summer to fall means many things: leaves changing colors, dropping temperatures, and—depending on where you live—stink bugs sneaking into your home. Stink bugs were named for their distinct ability to emit an unpleasant odor when they are threatened or disturbed by predators like lizards or birds. This also means that if stink bugs enter your home and feel threatened, you’ll be faced with dealing with their strong smell in your house. As we head into fall, you might find yourself with more active stink bugs than usual, so it’s important to know the basics about these smelly insects.

What are Earwigs?

Most people have probably heard of earwigs at some point or another. These creepy-looking insects are associated with some urban myths. Learn the truth about earwigs, including what attracts them and how to help get rid of them.

ARE TICKS DANGEROUS?

The majority of ticks will deliver painless bites without any noticeable symptoms. However, some ticks can carry a variety of bacteria and pathogens for disease. Although not all ticks are dangerous, you don’t want to risk coming into contact with these blood-sucking insects.

ARE TICKS DANGEROUS?

The majority of ticks will deliver painless bites without any noticeable symptoms. However, some ticks can carry a variety of bacteria and pathogens for disease. Although not all ticks are dangerous, you don’t want to risk coming into contact with these blood-sucking insects.

Are Bed Bugs Contagious?

Bed bugs are not too picky about where and when they catch a ride and don’t necessarily have a preferred mode of transportation, so it’s no surprise how many people wonder, are bed bugs contagious?

Related Articles

Do Earwigs Bite?

If you shudder a little when you think about earwigs, you’re probably not alone. They’ve developed quite a nasty reputation, thanks to urban legends (mostly false) that have been circulating for years. But are they harmful?

Cluster Flies In Your Home

If you’re like many homeowners, you’ve dealt with annoying flies ruining your summer barbecues and outdoor dinner parties. You may have even become accustomed to whipping out the flypaper and heavy-duty bug zappers the minute you hear the familiar buzz of a fly. These annoying pests are likely house flies, which can pose significant health risks to you and your family. But have you ever seen large, sluggish flies loitering inside your home in the autumn and winter? They may be cluster flies.

Tips to Get Rid of Stink Bugs in Your House

Now that it’s fall, it’s officially indoor stink bug season. Before it becomes winter, brown marmorated stink bugs are looking for comfortable overwintering sites to spend the cold months—and that can often mean that they may find a way to sneak into your house. While the odor that a stink bug releases is not dangerous, they are definitely a nuisance. Luckily, there are steps you can take to get rid of stink bugs in your house—without having to deal with the unpleasant smell.

What are Sand Fleas?

Many people love going to the beach to spend time in the sun, sand, and water. But they might not love some of the nuisances that live at the beach or in the ocean, such as gnats or jellyfish. But, what about the sand flea, a small critter that can be found in moist areas such as under rocks or debris. Keep reading to learn exactly what sand fleas are and if you need to worry about them.

The Lifespans of Insects With Short Lives

Many insects, such as butterflies, have a lifespan that occurs in four stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult. Other insects, such as grasshoppers, do not have a pupal stage and instead go through three stages: egg, nymph, and adult. The length of each stage can vary based on many things, from the insect species to the temperature outside—but what some insects share in common is a very short adult stage. Keep reading to learn about five insects with some of the shortest adult stages in their lifespan.

The Return of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

The change of seasons from summer to fall means many things: leaves changing colors, dropping temperatures, and—depending on where you live—stink bugs sneaking into your home. Stink bugs were named for their distinct ability to emit an unpleasant odor when they are threatened or disturbed by predators like lizards or birds. This also means that if stink bugs enter your home and feel threatened, you’ll be faced with dealing with their strong smell in your house. As we head into fall, you might find yourself with more active stink bugs than usual, so it’s important to know the basics about these smelly insects.

Bed Bug Droppings, Poop, Feces (Updated)


Source

The bed bug is the common insect lives around us in our houses.

This little insect can be an invisible threat to the human being. It feeds on human blood and leaves droppings nearby.

These droppings are as disturbing as bed bugs bites.

We can find the bed bug poops behindorbeneath the beddings, furniture and other hidden areas.

What is a bed bug?

The bed bug is a domestic insect life in the human residence.

It bites us like other insects do. But the difference is, bed bugs feed only human blood. They don’t use other food resources.

It’s not larger than an apple seed.

An adult bed bug can be up to:

3-7 mm in size.

It’s reddish or brownish in color.

They have a tendency to leave bloodshed took from our body on the bedsheets, along with the edges of furniture, inside walls and their cracks.

Bed Bug Poop, Feces or Droppings

What are bed bug poops, feces or droppings?

Bed bug poop is nothing but the leftover digested blood.

This small creature leaves:

The exoskeleton (feces), eggs, sometimes the larvae etc. as bed bug droppings.

A nymph bed bug requires to change its feces up to5 times in its lifecycle.

Sometimes

These feces are found spread on our beds and other areas.

Bed Bug Droppings Look Like

Bed bug droppings may look like other feces left by other insects.

These feces are smooth to touch and faded in color. The poop or bloodshed are darker as they get dried after a couple of hours the bed bugs leave. These droppings are found clustered in a single place or spread on the whole bed cover.

These are quite easy to smear on the places.

This helps to stain our useful:

  • Clothing
  • Mattress
  • Drapes and
  • Other furniture

Bed Bug Feces on Mattress

Bedbugs feces are mostly seen on the mattresses. This is because we humans lie on the bed and thus the bed bugs bite us frequently.

After having a full meal,

They move to their hideouts.

They leave feces, poops etc. while they move. These feces make stains on the mattresses.

While we sleep in the same bed, the feces can spread more. The droppings on the mattress can be faded red color with the pace of the time.

Bed Bug Poop on Sheets

Bed bug poops create stains on the sheets when they are crushed. And the funny thing is, we unwantedly crush their feces or poops while we are sleeping. This poops on the sheets look like rust or red spots.

Therefore,

We are bound to clean the bed sheets and also kill the bed bugs.

Bed Bug Feces on Wood

bed bugs don’t choose woods to crawl on.

But

We can find bed bug feces on woods.

In the hideouts of wooden furniture, we can see dark exoskeletons left by the bed bugs.

You will see a lot in the cracks, crevices of those wood furniture –

Chair, table, wardrobe etc. places can be full of these bed bug feces. You can easily identify them.

Not only:

The feces, you will see poop, bloodshed in the woods.

Bed Bug Feces Smear Test

Bed bug leaves feces on the spots after having its meal. It makes these places dirty with its semi-liquid black poop.

Other insects may leave fecal spot but they won’t smear.

To have a smear test,

You can rub the fecal spot with a soft paper towel or tissue gently.

You may find this quite hard to flake off or brush away.

Bed Bug Feces Stains

Stains are always embarrassing, right? Bed bug fecal stains are also the same thing. You can’t wash them easily. These stains are caused by the blood dripped out from the anus of bed bugs.

This happens mostly when these bugs have just finished their meal or a few moments later.

These fecal stains are dark in color, can be reddish or brownish.

Bed Bug Poop What Does It Look Like

Bed bug poop on –

  • Walls
  • Mattress
  • Bed cover
  • Pillow cover etc.

All looks the same.

It’s kind of sign of bed bug infestation in your home. Bed bug poops are smaller in size but can smear and later create stains on the focal spot.

You can see these black or reddish but darker things, especially on your bedding. They can be in clustered or spread way.

You may enjoy to read:

Signs of Bed Bugs

Let’s see what are some common question which relates to bed bug poop or bed bug droppings. These questions’ answer may help you to sort out the whole concept of this subject.

Question:How to bed bug poop test?
Answer:You can test bed bug poop with soft tissue or paper towel by gently rubbing the fecal spot.

Question:How big is bed bug poop?
Answer:Egg, eggshells are less than 1 mm. Other droppings are quite smaller.

Question:What color is bed bug poop?
Answer:As bed bug sucks blood from our skin, its poop becomes red or reddish at first when it’s wet. Later, this poop becomes dark brown or black after drying.

Question:What do bed bug poop look like?
Answer:Small feces, digested blood etc. are also considered as bed bug poop or droppings. These look like small balls or hunches in shape.

Question:What does bed bug poop look like on sheets?
Answer:Generally, bed bugs leave these poops or droppings at night. So, you may find them at night or early morning surely. These dark, little things will spread in a cluster or randomly.

Bed bug has become a part of our life though it is totally unwanted and disturbing insect.

  • Eggs
  • Eggshells
  • Feces or exoskeletons
  • Digested blood etc. in our house even in our room.

We can see these droppings spread everywhere which making things dirty.

We can get stains which is tough to be washed away.

A smear test can help us to figure out the bed bug poop on the bedcover, mattress, cushions, and other bed bug hideouts.

Bed Bug Poop: Bed Bug Droppings Images

Bed bugs are one of the most irritating insects that infest in the homes of people. These little bugs become so hard to eliminate, and therefore, it becomes very important to know about their infestation when they’re low in numbers.

For that, finding the bed bug poop is one of the most effective ways.

If you find the bed bug poop on the bed, sofa, and in the floor, then it is a clear indication that you have a bed bug infestation in your house.

But, there are many bugs whose poop is similar to bed bugs, and you can easily think any other bugs poop as the bed bug droppings.

Therefore, it is important to learn how to identify bed bug feces, if you find something.

So, let’s get started.

What Do Bed Bug Poop Look Like

The poop of bed bugs appears as the cluster of tiny spots on the surface. These droppings consist of digested blood, so these spots look like dark reddish or similar to black in color when they dry.

These spots can be darker, rust-colored or pure black in color, and if we talk about the size, they are not larger than the size of a dot from a marker.

Where to Find Bed Bug Feces

If you want to know whether you have a bed bug infestation in your house or not, then the best way is to find the feces of bed bugs.

For that, check in the corners or edges of your bed.

As these insects infest in the bed, so you can find them in the corners, edges of your bed, under the sheet or in the creases of the mattress.

In most of the cases, you can find the droppings on the bed, while if the infestation is heavy in a room, then you can also find the droppings on the carpet, along with the edges of the wall, and other places where you can suspect their presence.

Another thing that can be helpful to find whether it is bed bug poop or not, you have to look at the shed skin, egg shells, or the blood stains. If you find the droppings in the form of reddish black spots on the surface along with eggshells, shed skin and blood stains, then you can guess it is bed bug poop.

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