How Can I Kill Bed Bugs

How to Kill Bed Bugs with Household Items

It’s perfectly natural to want to eliminate a bed bug infestation without spending a ton of money on professional-grade products or a treatment by a pest control operator. When people discover that they have bed bugs, they often turn to do-it-yourself recommendations from discussions on the Internet. These suggestions might include household items, some of which are recommended more often than others. Let’s take a closer look at some of the most popular items and how they might be used against bed bugs:

Rubbing Alcohol

First up is the most commonly recommended tool by far: rubbing alcohol diluted in water. This is suggested because alcohol can kill bed bugs on contact, and evaporates shortly after, so it’s considered safe for use pretty much anywhere in a home. A recurring theme in these recommendations are household items that are considered to be safer for people than mainstream chemicals.

While alcohol can kill bed bugs on contact, it’s not going to kill nearly enough of bed bugs to be considered effective. In lab studies, even 99 percent concentrations of alcohol only killed between 40% to 60% of the adults that were sprayed. On top of that, alcohol has no long-lasting residual effect, and doesn’t affect bed bug eggs. 60% sounds good, but a contact killer should be able to kill a lot closer to 100% of the bed bugs you see. Otherwise, a shoe or a blowtorch would be the more reliable tool for the job.(Editor’s note: please don’t use a blowtorch.)

In a bed bug treatment, alcohol is basically an attempt to fill the role of a contact spray, which is an insecticide spray that kills bed bugs on contact. These sprays are proven to kill at a higher rate than rubbing alcohol could manage, and are extremely versatile in where they can be applied. Pair contact sprays with a couple of residual sprays, and you have a combination of chemicals that will kill bed bugs quickly now, and keep killing over the next few weeks.

Essential Oils

The next recommendation is a mixture of essential oils. You might see one of many oils or combinations of oils in online discussion, whether it’s clove oil, cedar wood, lavender, or a combination of mint oils. The use of these against bed bugs dates back centuries, as their simple method of suffocating the bugs predates the use of sophisticated chemical killers.

The use of various oils against bed bugs is encouraged by various studies that have shown these oils successfully killing bed bugs. However, those tests tend to use bed bugs that do not have the opportunity to feed on anyone. In real-world scenarios, where the bugs can still reach a person and feed after being sprayed, they usually survive.

The main reason people seem to favor the essential oil option is that it’s considered a natural and chemical-free alternative to pesticide sprays. What they don’t realize is that today’s home pesticides are carefully regulated by the EPA to make sure that they’re safe for indoor use. The EPA also requires that health and safety guidelines are included in the product label and MSDS, to ensure that anyone who uses a spray has instructions on how to use it safely and effectively. When used correctly, even our strongest bed bug sprays won’t have any effect on you, but they will kill bed bugs more effectively than any mixture of household items like herbs or oils.

Oil-based products have been so frequently touted as natural bed bug killers that they’ve even attracted government intervention. The Federal Trade Commission has charged multiple companies with deceptive advertising for overhyping their cedar oil-based products’ ability to treat an infestation. By claiming that their products can stop and prevent bed bug infestations, these marketers opened the door to government lawsuits for misleading their customers.

Double-Sided Tape

Another common suggestion is to use either double-sided tape or Vaseline. The theory is that you can stop bed bugs from climbing the legs of your bed by applying these to the legs. Unfortunately, report after report from customers has indicated that these solutions simply don’t work. I hear all the time about bed bugs crawling right over Vaseline, carpet tape, and other adhesive traps like glue boards.

If a trap method does not effectively stop bed bugs, then I wouldn’t consider it. Instead, I would recommend a set of ClimbUp Insect Interceptors. These are pitfall traps that go under the legs of your bed and trap bed bugs in a talcum-lined pitfall that is too slick and smooth for them to climb out of. ClimbUp Interceptors have been proven over the years to be effective, and are an essential part of our recommended treatment process.

Clothes Iron

Bed bugs are highly vulnerable to heat; exposing them to a certain amount of direct heat will kill them instantly, while lower temperatures can kill them in a matter of minutes. This is why many forms of heat treatments are recommended. Some methods, such as steamers and portable heaters, have been proven effective through professional use and are quickly becoming standard issue in holistic treatment arsenals.

Some less proven heat weapons have been suggested online, such as clothes irons. Clothes irons might reach the temperature needed to kill bed bugs, but the heat won’t penetrate deep into soft materials to where bed bugs might be hiding. You also can’t iron areas besides clothes and sheets, like cracks and crevices in walls, floors, and furniture. The metal surface and high surface heat would damage many of the materials it wasn’t designed to be used on.

Hair Dryer

A hair dryer might seem like a safer way to kill bed bugs with heat. Unfortunately, their maximum temperature is rarely more than 150 degrees. That heat level can kill bed bugs, but only if you maintain the heat over them for several minutes. So unless you want to follow each bug you see around with a hair dryer until they eventually die, you’d probably be better off just hitting them with the thing.

Just to be clear, you can kill bed bugs with heat. It’s just a matter of using the right equipment. A high-pressure steamer is the weapon of choice for killing bed bugs on contact, since their steam can surpass 200 degrees, and can penetrate deep into soft materials like mattresses and upholstered furniture. You can also use a steamer on more than just clothes or other fabrics; a steamer can kill bed bugs hiding along baseboards, floorboards, window sills, door frames, and the edges of the carpet.

If you need to treat items that can’t be laundered or steamed, you can use a portable bed bug heater, like a ZappBug Oven or a ThermalStrike Ranger. These heaters can safely treat household items like books, papers, CDs, and dry clean only clothing. Not only are bed bug heaters an effective part of a bed bug treatment process, but they’re one of the most popular prevention tools on the market. When you come home from a trip, just put your suitcase in the heater, zip it shut, and turn it on. In just a few hours, any bed bugs or eggs hiding in your belongings will be dead.

A lot of DIY bed bug recommendations involving household items stem from the desire to solve your bed bug problem without spending money or resorting to chemicals. Unfortunately, these recommendations don’t always pan out. Bloggers and forum posters usually aren’t professionals (this blog author being one of the exceptions). They haven’t done the same research, and they tend not to have much experience getting rid of bed bugs themselves.

When professionals need to treat an infestation, they don’t reach for rubbing alcohol or cedar oil or a blow dryer. They use a proven treatment process that involves a combination of proven products to get the job done. It’s not about whether or not a certain itemcankill bed bugs, it’s about whether that item is the ideal part of a treatment that will actually get rid of an infestation. After all, your shoe would have a 100% kill rate on any bed bugs you smack with it – that doesn’t mean you can expect to be bed bug free after a diligent afternoon of shoe-wielding.

How to Kill Bed Bugs with Household Items

It’s perfectly natural to want to eliminate a bed bug infestation without spending a ton of money on professional-grade products or a treatment by a pest control operator. When people discover that they have bed bugs, they often turn to do-it-yourself recommendations from discussions on the Internet. These suggestions might include household items, some of which are recommended more often than others. Let’s take a closer look at some of the most popular items and how they might be used against bed bugs:

Rubbing Alcohol

First up is the most commonly recommended tool by far: rubbing alcohol diluted in water. This is suggested because alcohol can kill bed bugs on contact, and evaporates shortly after, so it’s considered safe for use pretty much anywhere in a home. A recurring theme in these recommendations are household items that are considered to be safer for people than mainstream chemicals.

While alcohol can kill bed bugs on contact, it’s not going to kill nearly enough of bed bugs to be considered effective. In lab studies, even 99 percent concentrations of alcohol only killed between 40% to 60% of the adults that were sprayed. On top of that, alcohol has no long-lasting residual effect, and doesn’t affect bed bug eggs. 60% sounds good, but a contact killer should be able to kill a lot closer to 100% of the bed bugs you see. Otherwise, a shoe or a blowtorch would be the more reliable tool for the job.(Editor’s note: please don’t use a blowtorch.)

In a bed bug treatment, alcohol is basically an attempt to fill the role of a contact spray, which is an insecticide spray that kills bed bugs on contact. These sprays are proven to kill at a higher rate than rubbing alcohol could manage, and are extremely versatile in where they can be applied. Pair contact sprays with a couple of residual sprays, and you have a combination of chemicals that will kill bed bugs quickly now, and keep killing over the next few weeks.

Essential Oils

The next recommendation is a mixture of essential oils. You might see one of many oils or combinations of oils in online discussion, whether it’s clove oil, cedar wood, lavender, or a combination of mint oils. The use of these against bed bugs dates back centuries, as their simple method of suffocating the bugs predates the use of sophisticated chemical killers.

The use of various oils against bed bugs is encouraged by various studies that have shown these oils successfully killing bed bugs. However, those tests tend to use bed bugs that do not have the opportunity to feed on anyone. In real-world scenarios, where the bugs can still reach a person and feed after being sprayed, they usually survive.

The main reason people seem to favor the essential oil option is that it’s considered a natural and chemical-free alternative to pesticide sprays. What they don’t realize is that today’s home pesticides are carefully regulated by the EPA to make sure that they’re safe for indoor use. The EPA also requires that health and safety guidelines are included in the product label and MSDS, to ensure that anyone who uses a spray has instructions on how to use it safely and effectively. When used correctly, even our strongest bed bug sprays won’t have any effect on you, but they will kill bed bugs more effectively than any mixture of household items like herbs or oils.

Oil-based products have been so frequently touted as natural bed bug killers that they’ve even attracted government intervention. The Federal Trade Commission has charged multiple companies with deceptive advertising for overhyping their cedar oil-based products’ ability to treat an infestation. By claiming that their products can stop and prevent bed bug infestations, these marketers opened the door to government lawsuits for misleading their customers.

Double-Sided Tape

Another common suggestion is to use either double-sided tape or Vaseline. The theory is that you can stop bed bugs from climbing the legs of your bed by applying these to the legs. Unfortunately, report after report from customers has indicated that these solutions simply don’t work. I hear all the time about bed bugs crawling right over Vaseline, carpet tape, and other adhesive traps like glue boards.

If a trap method does not effectively stop bed bugs, then I wouldn’t consider it. Instead, I would recommend a set of ClimbUp Insect Interceptors. These are pitfall traps that go under the legs of your bed and trap bed bugs in a talcum-lined pitfall that is too slick and smooth for them to climb out of. ClimbUp Interceptors have been proven over the years to be effective, and are an essential part of our recommended treatment process.

Clothes Iron

Bed bugs are highly vulnerable to heat; exposing them to a certain amount of direct heat will kill them instantly, while lower temperatures can kill them in a matter of minutes. This is why many forms of heat treatments are recommended. Some methods, such as steamers and portable heaters, have been proven effective through professional use and are quickly becoming standard issue in holistic treatment arsenals.

Some less proven heat weapons have been suggested online, such as clothes irons. Clothes irons might reach the temperature needed to kill bed bugs, but the heat won’t penetrate deep into soft materials to where bed bugs might be hiding. You also can’t iron areas besides clothes and sheets, like cracks and crevices in walls, floors, and furniture. The metal surface and high surface heat would damage many of the materials it wasn’t designed to be used on.

Hair Dryer

A hair dryer might seem like a safer way to kill bed bugs with heat. Unfortunately, their maximum temperature is rarely more than 150 degrees. That heat level can kill bed bugs, but only if you maintain the heat over them for several minutes. So unless you want to follow each bug you see around with a hair dryer until they eventually die, you’d probably be better off just hitting them with the thing.

Just to be clear, you can kill bed bugs with heat. It’s just a matter of using the right equipment. A high-pressure steamer is the weapon of choice for killing bed bugs on contact, since their steam can surpass 200 degrees, and can penetrate deep into soft materials like mattresses and upholstered furniture. You can also use a steamer on more than just clothes or other fabrics; a steamer can kill bed bugs hiding along baseboards, floorboards, window sills, door frames, and the edges of the carpet.

If you need to treat items that can’t be laundered or steamed, you can use a portable bed bug heater, like a ZappBug Oven or a ThermalStrike Ranger. These heaters can safely treat household items like books, papers, CDs, and dry clean only clothing. Not only are bed bug heaters an effective part of a bed bug treatment process, but they’re one of the most popular prevention tools on the market. When you come home from a trip, just put your suitcase in the heater, zip it shut, and turn it on. In just a few hours, any bed bugs or eggs hiding in your belongings will be dead.

A lot of DIY bed bug recommendations involving household items stem from the desire to solve your bed bug problem without spending money or resorting to chemicals. Unfortunately, these recommendations don’t always pan out. Bloggers and forum posters usually aren’t professionals (this blog author being one of the exceptions). They haven’t done the same research, and they tend not to have much experience getting rid of bed bugs themselves.

When professionals need to treat an infestation, they don’t reach for rubbing alcohol or cedar oil or a blow dryer. They use a proven treatment process that involves a combination of proven products to get the job done. It’s not about whether or not a certain itemcankill bed bugs, it’s about whether that item is the ideal part of a treatment that will actually get rid of an infestation. After all, your shoe would have a 100% kill rate on any bed bugs you smack with it – that doesn’t mean you can expect to be bed bug free after a diligent afternoon of shoe-wielding.

US EPA

Bed Bugs

Do-it-yourself Bed Bug Control

Can you get rid of bed bugs on your own?

Treating bed bugs is complex. Your likelihood of success depends on many factors, including:

  • How many bed bugs you have;
  • How much clutter is available for hiding places;
  • Whether your neighbors have bedbugs; and
  • Whether all residents of a house or building will participate.

Getting rid of bed bugs completely can take weeks to months, depending on the nature and extent of the infestation. To be successful, everyone will need to cooperate and do their part.

The following steps will help you begin:

You may have to follow these steps more than once to kill all the bugs and their eggs.

Identify the Problem

  • Identify the pest:
  • Collect a sample of the pest to show an extension agentExitor other insect expert.
  • Extension agents can identify the pest at no cost to you. They are trained in pest control and know your local area.
  • If an extension agent or other expert says the pest is a bed bug, notify your landlord if you live in an apartment. The units near yours should be inspected.
    • Landlords may have a responsibilityExit to participate in treatment.
    • Check the housing codes and laws in your area.
    • Inspect all areas that may have bed bugs, plus surrounding living spaces, to find out the extent of infestation.
    • Develop a Strategy

      • Make a schedule for completing the steps below. Be sure to include any personal plans, such as vacations.
      • Keep records through the whole process. Note the dates and exact locations where pests are found. This will help you track progress and better know where to target your work.
      • Keep checking for at least a year after you’re done to make sure all the bed bugs are gone.

      Keep the Infestation from Spreading

      • Remove infested items. Place them in a sealed plastic bag and treat them. Learn more about treatment methods in the sections below.
      • Items that cannot be treated should be placed in a sealed plastic bag and left there for up to a year to ensure any active bugs are dead.
      • Empty the vacuum after each use. Seal the bag as tightly as possible and immediately throw it out in an outdoor trash container.
      • Discard furniture responsibly if you can’t safely eliminate the bed bugs. Destroy it so someone else won’t be tempted to bring it into their home. For example:
      • Rip covers and remove stuffing from furniture items.
      • Use spray paint to mark furniture with "Bed Bugs."
    • Have infested items picked up as soon as possible by the trash collection agency.
    • Don’t discard furniture if you can safely eliminate the bed bugs from it.
    • Prepare for Treatment

      Preparing for treatment is very important; it will make it easier to monitor for bed bugs that haven’t been eliminated. This preparation should be completed whether you are doing the treatment yourself or hiring a professional.

      Kill the Bed Bugs

      • Make sure the methods you select are safe, effective and legal. See What’s Legal, What’s Not.
      • Considernon-chemical methodsof killing bed bugs. Some will be more useful than others depending on your situation. These and other methods can be helpful, but they might not get rid of the infestation entirely:
      • Heat treatment:You can use a clothes dryer on high heat. You can also use black plastic bags in a hot, closed car in the sun, but success depends on your climate and other factors. Do-it-yourself heat treatments might not work. Professionals have access to more intensive and proven methods that can even treat whole houses with heat. You may also purchase a portable heat chamber, which is usually quite effective.
      • Cold treatmentcan be successful in the home environment if the freezer is set to 0 o F. You must leave the items in a sealed bag in the freezer at that temperature for four days. Always use a thermometer to check the temperature, since home freezers are not always set to 0 o .
      • Steam cleaners(wet or dry) can get into cracks and fabrics to treat carpets, baseboards, bed frames, and other furniture. The steam temperature must be at least 130 o F but should not have a forceful airflow, or it may cause bed bugs to scatter. Use a diffuser to prevent scattering.
    • If needed,hire a pest management professional or use pesticidescarefully according to the label directions:
      • Look for EPA-registered pesticides that have bed bugs listed on the label.
      • Use foggers (bug bombs) only with extreme care and only if bed bugs are listed on the label. Improper use can harm your health or cause a fire or explosion. Foggers should not be your only method of bed bug control. The spray will not reach the cracks and crevices where bed bugs hide. See Should I Use a Fogger? for more information.
      • Carefully look for any evidence of bed bugsevery few days after you complete your initial cleanup and control processes.If you see bed bugs, either the initial cleanup missed some bugs or eggs have hatched. Retreatment may be needed.
      • Consider using different types of pesticides if repeated treatments are needed.Desiccants (chemicals that dry things out) can be particularly effectivein some situations since they work by drying out the bug (which means the bed bugs can’t develop resistance).
        • If using desiccants, be sure to use only products registered by EPA as a pesticide.
        • Do not use pool- or food-grade diatomaceous earth(made from the fossilized remains of tiny, aquatic organisms called diatoms). This type of diatomaceous earth can harm you when you breathe it in. The pesticide version uses a different size of diatoms, which reduces the hazard.
        • Desiccants can be very effective but may take several months to work.
        • Evaluate and Prevent

          • Continue to inspect for bed bugs, at least every 7 days, in case any eggs remain. You can use interceptors, traps or other monitoring methods. Interceptors are placed under the legs of furniture to catch bed bugs and keep them from climbing the legs. Commercial and do-it-yourself interceptors are options.
          • Continue to protect your home from bed bugs.

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          Bedbugs

          In this Article

          In this Article

          In this Article

          Bedbugs are small, oval, brownish insects that live on the blood of animals or humans. Adult bedbugs have flat bodies about the size of an apple seed. After feeding, however, their bodies swell and are a reddish color.

          Bedbugs do not fly, but they can move quickly over floors, walls, and ceilings. Female bedbugs may lay hundreds of eggs, each of which is about the size of a speck of dust, over a lifetime.

          Immature bedbugs, called nymphs, shed their skins five times before reaching maturity and require a meal of blood before each shedding. Under favorable conditions the bugs can develop fully in as little as a month and produce three or more generations per year.

          Although they are a nuisance, they are not thought to transmit diseases.

          Where Bed Bugs Hide

          Bedbugs may enter your home undetected through luggage, clothing, used beds and couches, and other items. Their flattened bodies make it possible for them to fit into tiny spaces, about the width of a credit card. Bedbugs do not have nests like ants or bees, but tend to live in groups in hiding places. Their initial hiding places are typically in mattresses, box springs, bed frames, and headboards where they have easy access to people to bite in the night.

          Over time, however, they may scatter through the bedroom, moving into any crevice or protected location. They may also spread to nearby rooms or apartments.

          Because bedbugs live solely on blood, having them in your home is not a sign of dirtiness. You are as likely to find them in immaculate homes and hotel rooms as in filthy ones.

          When Bedbugs Bite

          Bedbugs are active mainly at night and usually bite people while they are sleeping. They feed by piercing the skin and withdrawing blood through an elongated beak. The bugs feed from three to 10 minutes to become engorged and then crawl away unnoticed.

          Most bedbug bites are painless at first, but later turn into itchy welts. Unlike flea bites that are mainly around the ankles, bedbug bites are on any area of skin exposed while sleeping. Also, the bites do not have a red spot in the center like flea bites do.

          People who don’t realize they have a bedbug infestation may attribute the itching and welts to other causes, such as mosquitoes. To confirm bedbug bites, you must find and identify the bugs themselves.

          Continued

          Signs of Infestation

          If you wake up with itchy areas you didn’t have when you went to sleep, you may have bedbugs, particularly if you got a used bed or other used furniture around the time the bites started. Other signs that you have bedbugs include:

          • Blood stains on your sheets or pillowcases
          • Dark or rusty spots of bedbug excrement on sheets and mattresses, bed clothes, and walls
          • Bedbug fecal spots, egg shells, or shed skins in areas where bedbugs hide
          • An offensive, musty odor from the bugs’ scent glands

          If you suspect an infestation, remove all bedding and check it carefully for signs of the bugs or their excrement. Remove the dust cover over the bottom of the box springs and examine the seams in the wood framing. Peel back the fabric where it is stapled to the wood frame.

          Also, check the area around the bed, including inside books, telephones or radios, the edge of the carpet, and even in electrical outlets. Check your closet, because bedbugs can attach to clothing. If you are uncertain about signs of bedbugs, call an exterminator, who will know what to look for.

          If you find signs of infestation, begin steps to get rid of the bugs and prevent their return.

          Bedbug Treatments

          Getting rid of bedbugs begins with cleaning up the places where bedbugs live. This should include the following:

          • Clean bedding, linens, curtains, and clothing in hot water and dry them on the highest dryer setting. Place stuffed animals, shoes, and other items that can’t be washed in the dryer and run on high for 30 minutes.
          • Use a stiff brush to scrub mattress seams to remove bedbugs and their eggs before vacuuming.
          • Vacuum your bed and surrounding area frequently. After vacuuming, immediately place the vacuum cleaner bag in a plastic bag and place in garbage can outdoors.
          • Encase mattress and box springs with a tightly woven, zippered cover to keep bedbugs from entering or escaping. Bedbugs may live up to a year without feeding, so keep the cover on your mattress for at least a year to make sure all bugs in the mattress are dead.
          • Repair cracks in plaster and glue down peeling wallpaper to get rid of places bedbugs can hide.
          • Get rid of clutter around the bed.

          If your mattress is infested, you may want to get rid of it and get a new one, but take care to rid the rest of your home of bedbugs or they will infest your new mattress.

          Continued

          Bedbug Extermination

          While cleaning up infested areas will be helpful in controlling bedbugs, getting rid of them usually requires chemical treatments. Because treating your bed and bedroom with insecticides can be harmful, it is important to use products that can be used safely in bedrooms. Do not treat mattresses and bedding unless the label specifically says you can use them on bedding.

          Generally it is safest and most effective to hire an experienced pest control professional for bedbug extermination.

          Sources

          University of Kentucky College of Agriculture: "Bed Bugs."

          Ohio State University Extension Fact Sheet: "Bed Bugs."

          The New York City Department of Heath and Mental Hygiene: "Stop Bed Bugs Safely."

          University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension Lancaster County: "Managing Bed Bugs."

          What’s the Surefire Way to Kill Bed Bugs and the Eggs in Seconds?

          To kill bed bugs is to save yourself from a lot of problems. However, before you could eliminate them, there are several preparatory steps that you first have to take so you will know how to get rid of bed bugs. With all those problems and pre-elimination work, many think it is better to prevent the pests by using bed bug spray than to let them in and just get rid of them.

          If you don’t know what bed bugs are, you might think that all those steps to prevent their presence or are exaggerated. But if you have once experienced the problems they could bring, surely you would think otherwise.

          But bed bugs are unlike any other pests common to houses. They may be flightless, but they are fast-paced. And though they are small, they are sneaky.

          That means despite your preventive steps, bed bugs could still get into your house. But of course, that doesn’t translate that taking preventive measures is futile. In contrast, it is a great help in reducing the chance of bed bugs to infest. Nonetheless, it couldn’t completely protect you and your home from the said pests. Hence, you must always be ready to kill bed bugs whenever they get past your defenses.

          Why Kill Bed Bugs?

          As mentioned, bed bugs could bring in several problems. That is the general reason why you need to eliminate them.

          But, particularly though, you have to kill bed bugs so you could:

          • protect yourself from their bites

          By eliminating bed bugs, you are basically stopping them from feeding on you or anybody else in your house, even on your pet. It’s true, bed bugs are not known as vectors of diseases. However, their bites could leave nasty marks. Not to mention, to others, their bites could cause allergies and other skin problems.

          Because bed bugs have become so prevalent in the past few years, many fear they’ll be their next victim. They became so anxious and paranoid of the possible bed bug presence. If you eliminate the pests though, you could have a certain sense of peace knowing that you would not be bothered or bitten them. However, you wouldn’t be able to sleep well for long if you would not kill bed bugs right and continuously do the bed bug preventive steps.

          So how do eliminate bed bugs properly? It’s by eradicating even their eggs and nymphs.

          Kill Bed Bugs and Their Eggs and Nymphs

          Of all the house pests that you may encounter, bed bugs are probably the most annoying. Primarily, that’s because they are quick to re-start an infestation. And needless to say that will require you to repeat your bed bug treatment, which asks you to spend more money, time and energy.

          To avoid that, you need to execute a proper bed bug elimination. And by proper, that means you also need to eliminate bed bug eggs and nymphs as in a matter of days, they would hatch and grow. If you don’t stop that, a re-infestation will surely occur.

          Bed bugs have six life stages from eggs to adulthood. The adults and nymphs of the pests could stay out of sight for months after feeding so they are quite difficult to detect. However, the eggs are much harder to locate. Female bed bugs usually hide them in dark and deep cracks and crevices. The fact that they are very small, makes it even harder to search for them. So, if you need to implement a keen inspection when looking for adult bed bugs, you need to be more canny when looking for their eggs.

          Bed Bugs – Eggs, Nymphs, Adults

          Here are some tips that could help you find Bed Bugs Eggs

          • See pictures of bed bugs‘ eggs and nymphs. This will show what exactly you should detect apart from the adults of them.
          • Prepare a flashlight and a stick. They will help you find bed bug eggs easily.
          • Know the signs of bed bugs. Where they usually stay, there they lay their eggs.

          Read the Latest Bed Bug News!

          How to Kill Bed Bugs?

          Now that you know why you need to kill bed bugs and why you to have to include their eggs and their nymphs in the elimination, let’s now move to the “what kills bed bugs” part.

          There are actually several techniques of doing a bed bug treatment. However, you could generally classify them into two – chemical-based and non-chemical-based.

          In the chemical-based category, there are two methods included. Though we consider the two as different means, they both rely on the use chemical pesticides. The first method is by hiring bed bug exterminators who use strong solutions to eliminate the pests. It offers an easy yet expensive and risky bed bug treatment even if the exterminator use the best chemical to kill bed bugs.

          The second technique is by doing a bed bug treatment by yourself using a chemical solution. Though this method offers quick results and is a bit inexpensive, still this is a risky process. Like the hiring of an exterminator that uses chemical pesticides, it presents several health risks and could cause asthma, allergies, breathing difficulties and even poisoning. Another problem is that, studies about the said pests found out that bed bugs are now becoming resistant to chemical pesticides.

          On the other hand, in the non-chemical-based category, there are a lot more options. And because they are more friendly to health and the environment, they are generally the better bed bug treatment choices.

          What methods are included under this category?

          • Heat Treatment– this method kills bed bugs with heat. This could be implemented on clothes by putting them in a drier at a high temperature for 30 minutes. In a room, the use of heating devices could kill even the eggs and the nymphs of bed bugs at certain levels temperature at different durations of time. Ideally, to kill bed bugs in all stages, the temperature must be 115 degrees F or 46 degrees C.
          • Cold Treatment– as you could easily guess, this method freezes bed bugs to kill them. And just like the heat treatment, this could also get rid even the eggs and the nymphs of the pests. As bed bugs could still survive at -14 degree C, anything lower than that could eliminate them.
          • Vacuuming– though this method could work, it takes so much effort to vacuum all possible bed bug spots. Another problem is that vacuum sometimes could not reach the deep cracks and crevices where bed bugs hide.

          • Use of Organic-Based Bed Bug Spray– thanks to growing going green trend, there are now bed bug products made with natural ingredients. With them, you could now get rid of the crawlies safely, easily and inexpensively. However, you should take note that this method only works if you have the best-selling bed bug spray that kills on contact and is without harsh chemical ingredients.

          The Best Non-Chemical Bed Bug Treatment

          Given the benefits it presents to your health and the health of others apart from the elimination of the pests, it is clear that the non-chemical methods are the better ways to kill bed bugs. But as you might already know, there is more than a single way to eradicate the pests. Which of them should you implement?

          Considering the process of implementation, expenses, effectiveness and safety of each technique, the use of an organic-based bed bug spray is the best bed bug treatment, correct?

          But what is the best bed bug solution to get?

          Well, among others, you would want to purchase Green Bean Buddy bed bug killer. As stated in FIFRA 25 (b), it is a minimum-risk pesticide. That’s because it is made with organic-based products. More than that, pest-control companies already proved that they truly work withtheir continuous use of it. And with its new licensing agreement, you could also now enjoy its effectiveness, safety and affordability.

          12 Easy DIY Ways to Get Rid of Bed Bugs Quickly: A Killer Guide

          I enjoy writing about home improvement and household pest control.

          Eliminate Bed Bugs From Your Home!

          In order to get rid of this pest, you need to understand how it works. Getting rid of bed bugs can be a tricky task because they are expert hitchhikers. The best thing you can do is to entrust the task with an experienced pest control professional. However, if you are planning to do it yourself, I’ve provided you great tips and information about bed bugs to help you in your battle. That way, you can use your knowledge to eliminate them and keep them away.

          • How to Get Rid of Bed Bugs
          • What Are Bed Bugs?
          • What Attracts Bed Bugs?
          • How Can You Know If You’re Infected?
          • Bed Bug FAQ’s
          • How to Avoid Bed Bugs When Traveling
          • How to Treat Bed Bug Bites
          • How DDT Affects Bed Bugs

          How to Get Rid of Bed Bugs

          1. Bedding and garments need to be washed in boiled water, preferably at 120°F.
          2. Dry clean all your clothes.
          3. For items that cannot be washed, wrap them in a transparent plastic bag and place the bag outdoors where the temperature can reach 120°F.
          4. Use well-known insecticides to kill bed bugs.
          5. Kill bed bugs by freezing them. Although it’s a bit difficult and time-consuming, you can save this trick for the winter time.
          6. Steam your carpets above 120°F.
          7. Vacuuming the house may not eliminate each and every egg and bug, but it can help get rid of them to a degree.
          8. Rubbing alcohol can kill bugs that come in with it contact, but you cannot rely solely on this method.
          9. Buy a bed bug spray that contains IGR (Insect Growth Regulator), which is very effective if the infestation is small.
          10. Reduce clutter in your home. With less clutter, bed bugs have fewer places to hide and reproduce.
          11. Non-toxic and pet-friendly, diatomaceous earth is an environmentally friendly way to kill all kinds of insects, including bed bugs. You can find it in powdered and spray forms.
          12. Some oils like tea tree and neem oil can’t kill bed bugs, but they work well to repel them. Tea tree oil is an extract from theMelaleucaalternifolia plant—it can cause various health problems with pet birds, cats, and small dogs. If there are pets in the house, look for other safer choices. If you use the oil, apply it in small quantities to the skin to repel bed bugs. Since bed bugs are active at night, apply it before bedtime.

          What Are Bed Bugs?

          A bed bug (Cimex lectularius) is a small, blood-sucking parasite that feeds on the blood of warm-blooded animals and humans. A bed bug begins its life as a white egg about 1mm long. It takes 10 days to hatch and grow into an adult in six weeks. An adult bed bug may grow up to eight millimeters in size.

          • They belong to the insect family Cimicidae.
          • There are different types of bed bugs in existence.

          Bed bugs are mainly found in the bedroom—hotels, inns, and private homes alike. These insects, with their flat bodies, can hide in tiny chinks in and around the bed. They wait for their prey (us) to sleep. Then, they come out poking their snout into our skin to suck our blood. They are most active about an hour before dawn.

          Their bite causes itchy red bumps similar to mosquito bites. The color of a bed bug can be reddish-brown to brown. The more they eat, the darker they become. Immature bed bugs (nymphs) can be translucent or light tan in color. Bed bugs are often red in color after feeding, and they are attracted to heat.

          • A bed bug bite is typically a red spot with a small central bulge around the sting site. The slot-opening is still visible. Usually, you can find several bumps together.

          What Attracts Bed Bugs?

          Contrary to popular belief, dirty places are not a source of bed bugs. They need warm blood, and they spread wherever it is available. It doesn’t matter if the area is tidy or dirty.

          They spread very quickly and can hide very well. You can catch bed bugs from public places like the theatre or hotel rooms. Bed bugs usually travel via clothes, luggage, coats, or whatever they can get. Whenever you come in contact with anything that carries bed bugs, you are attacked and become the new carriers.

          • Bed bugs can hide anywhere in your home: closets, behind baseboards, inside beds, etc.
          • The more cluttered your home is, the more hiding places exist for bed bugs.

          Bed Bug Symptoms

          You know when the itching starts and looking at the bites (possibly several of them) that bed bugs are a problem in your life. If they look similar to the pictures above, you’ve been attacked by bed bugs.

          • You can see rusty-colored blood spots on your sheets and furniture where bed bugs concentrate.
          • If the insects are in great numbers, you can smell a sweet, musty odor.

          It is hard to tell if you’ve been bitten by a bed bug because they inject an anesthetic and coagulant which prevents a person from realizing they are bitten.

          Other symptoms of bed bug bites include the following:

          Common Questions About Bed Bugs

          1. Can you see bed bugs?Yes. They can be seen, but it is difficult as they are experts at hiding. You may need to thoroughly check the whole bed, bed sheets, clothes, and luggage.
          2. How big are bed bugs?Adult bed bugs are usually 4-5 mm in length. They are completely flat, which makes it difficult to spot them. Young bed bugs are much smaller as 1.6 mm long. You can easily see a bed bug by putting little effort into looking.
          3. Are bed bugs dangerous?Unlike other insects, bed bugs are not very dangerous. They are simply irritating. In rare cases, they can transmit the hepatitis B virus. Also, the saliva they inject can cause allergic reactions in some people.
          4. Do bed bugs fly?No, they do not fly. Bed bugs do not have wings and therefore, cannot fly.
          5. Does alcohol kill bed bugs?Alcohol can kill bed bugs, but you cannot rely on alcohol to eliminate them entirely. Rubbing or spraying alcohol kills bed bugs that come in contact with it. It will not continue to kill them unless you spray alcohol periodically, which is not a good option. Also, alcohol does not kill bed bug eggs.
          6. How do bed bugs spread?Bed bugs can spread easily. The most common vehicles are clothes and luggage. They also travel via purses, suitcases, laptop bags, etc. That’s how they make their way to hotel rooms, offices, hospitals, and any other building.
          7. Where do bed bugs hide?Because their bodies are flat, they can hide under the smallest spots like the border of beds, under the mattress, edges of carpets, couches, cracks in the walls and ceilings, in your pillows, under your bed sheets, behind electrical plugs and wall sockets, in your cupboards and dressers, or under furniture. In fact, bed bugs prefer any fabric materials. They can travel pretty good distances, too. Expect them to be able to be found anywhere in the room.

          How to Treat Bed Bug Bites

          Here is a simple method to get rid of bed bug bites quickly and easily.

          What You’ll Need

          • Antibacterial soap
          • Towel
          • Anti-itch cream

          Instructions

          1. Wash the affected area with warm water. Apply soap to the area. Hand wash it gently but thoroughly. Rinse the area with warm water until all the soap is removed.
          2. Pat the area dry with a towel. Do not rub or scrub your skin. Apply the anti-itch cream to the area, following the instructions on the package. Gently apply the cream, but do not scratch or rub the area with a lot of pressure.
          3. Place the ice pack on the affected area. Leave it on for about 15 minutes to reduce the swelling.

          How to Avoid Bed Bugs When Traveling

          Before you book hotels, read the reviews online. Most travelers will not post fake reviews about bed bugs attack because they don’t have time for this.

          When you’re at the hotel, do the following steps:

          • Look for the signs of bed bugs in the room. The easy way to do this is to check the mattresses and bed sheets thoroughly for any dark spots: They may be dried bed bug feces. Other things to look for are blood stains, discarded bed bug skins, a sweet almond smell, and white bed bug eggs.
          • Check the rooms before you pay.
          • Always use cabinets and drawers to keep your clothes and luggage.

          How DDT Affects Bed Bugs

          Before World War II, bed bug infestations were common. After the introduction of DDT in the mid-20th century, however, bed bug infestations became less and less frequent.

          • DDT is a synthetic pesticide mass-produced in the 1940s. It was found to be useful against mosquitoes, bed bugs, and other insects. However, it was also found to harm people and was eventually banned in many countries, including the United States.
          • DDT reduced the presence of bed bugs in the 1940s and 1950s. The pesticide was continued to use until the 1970s. By this time, DDT was not able to kill bed bugs because they developed immunity.

          Bed bugs developed immunity to DDT in the 1950s. Now, the pesticide serves only as an anesthesia for the insect, causing it to fall rather than killing it. The recent upsurge in infections worldwide is associated with several factors, including the increase in international travel and resistance to insecticides.

          What Happens When a Bed Bug Bites You?

          Bed Bug Traps

          DIY Bed Bug Monitor

          "The Missouri Method" Bed Bug Trap

          This article is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge. Content is for informational or entertainment purposes only and does not substitute for personal counsel or professional advice in business, financial, legal, or technical matters.

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          Share Your Bed Bug Horror Stories!

          Samuel

          Thanks for the tips I hate dose f**k

          Jummie

          How I hate bed bugs! Thanks for the tips.

          kill em all

          Nasty little f***ers

          Dianna Mendez

          Oh my, I hate to hear of this bug and its damages to others. Thanks for the tips on dealing with them.

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