How Do Bed Bugs Look Like On Skin

Bedbugs Slideshow: An Informative Look at Bedbugs

Don’t Let the Bedbugs Bite

As if you needed something else to worry about, bedbugs, those pests from the old bedtime rhyme are making a comeback. More of a nuisance than a health hazard, they’re showing up to suck blood from people in hotels, college dorms, and hospitals. Take an informative look at bedbugs: what they are, where they lurk, and how to spot them before they get you.

Know the Enemy

Bedbugs are small, flat, wingless insects with six legs that, like mosquitoes, feed on blood from animals or people. They range in color from almost white to brown, but they turn rusty red after feeding. The common bedbug doesn’t grow much longer than 0.2 inches (0.5 centimeters) and can be seen by the naked eye to the astute observer.В Bedbugs get their name because they like to hide in bedding and mattresses.

Am I at Risk for Infestation?

Bedbugs are most often found in hotels, hostels, shelters, and apartment complexes where lots of people come and go. Because bedbugs hide in small crevices, they can hitch a ride into your home on luggage, pets, furniture, clothing, boxes, and other objects. Bedbugs are found worldwide, but are most common in developing countries. Once rare in North America, they may be on the rise due, in part, to increases in international travel.

Feeding Habits

These nocturnal creatures can hide in beds, floors, furniture, wood, and paper trash during the day. We humans usually become their dinner during the night, with peak biting activity just before dawn.They can obtain their meal in as little as three minutes, after which they are engorged and drop off the host, then crawl into a hiding place to digest their meal. Bedbugs can live for 10 months, and can go weeks without feeding.

Signs and Symptoms of Bedbug Bites

Amazingly, these sneaky little bloodsuckers dine on you without waking you. You don’t feel their stealthy bite because they inject a numbing agent into your body, along with an anticoagulant to keep your blood flowing as they suck. The first sign of bedbugs may be itchy, red bites on the skin, usually on the arms or shoulders. Bedbugs tend to leave straight rows of bites.

Treating Bites

Bedbug bites do not usually require treatment. If a secondary infection occurs (usually from scratching), apply a local antiseptic lotion or antibiotic cream or ointment. Creams with corticosteroids and oral antihistaminesare used for the primary, unbearable symptom of itch. In these more severe cases, you may need to see your doctor.

Do Bedbugs Transmit Diseases?

Bedbugs are more of a nuisance than a health hazard. In a recent study, researchers reviewed 53 recent studies on bedbugs and their health and medical effects. The results showed that although bedbugs have been blamed for the spread of up to 40 different human diseases, there is little evidence to suggest they are carriers of human disease.

Bedbug or Imposter?

Don’t assume your bites are bedbugs. Bites can be hard to identify, even for doctors. Rule out mosquitoes, fleas, mites, and biting gnats by conducting a visual inspection. It’s best to collect and identify bedbugs to confirm bites. Look for the bugs themselves or their bloodstains, especially along the seams of mattresses. Further, look for dark spots of insect waste where bedbugs might crawl into hiding places on furniture, walls, and floors.

Bite Back Against Bedbugs

Professional exterminators should get involved right off the bat—tell your landlord, super, hospital administrator, hotel owner, or you call a professional right up front. The exterminator will locate the bed bugs (which may be found in more than one location) and exterminate as needed. YOU will have to do a lot of laundry.В

Up Next

Next Slideshow Title

IMAGES PROVIDED BY:

(1) Getty Images
(2) Nigel Cattlin / Visuals Unlimited
(3) Brand X Pictures
(4) Mark Andersen
(5) В© Pulse Picture Library/CMP Images / Phototake — All rights reserved.
(6) Dr. Kenneth Greer / Visuals Unlimited
(7) Darlyne A. Murawski / National Geographic
(8) Courtesy of Orkin, Inc.
(9) Thinkstock

New York City Department of Heath and Mental Hygiene.
Ohio State University Extension Fact Sheet.
University of Kentucky College of Agriculture.
University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension Lancaster County.
Washington Post.

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson, MD on May 17, 2018

This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

WebMD Slideshows

View our slideshows to learn more about your health.

What’s Under Your Skin? Bugs That Burrow

Acanthamoeba

If you wear contact lenses, don’t wash them in tap water. You might pick up this bug, which can burrow into your eye and cause an infection calledAcanthamoebakeratitis. Symptoms include redness, a feeling that something’s in your eye, and sensitivity to light. If it isn’t treated, you could lose your sight. It’s most common among contact lens wearers, but anyone can get the bug. It lives in bodies of water like lakes and oceans, and in soil and air.

Loa Loa

This worm is a parasite that spreads through deer-fly bites. It burrows into your skin and causes itchy areas around your joints called Calabar swellings. It also leads to an infection called loiasis, or African eye worm. You may even see the worm as it crawls across the surface of your eye or under your skin. But you probably won’t get it unless you spend time in the rain forests of West and Central Africa.

Chigoe Fleas

These bugs, known as sand fleas or jiggers, dig into your feet at the heel, sole, or toes. They cause a skin disease called tungiasis. You don’t feel it when they go in. But they grow up to 2,000 times bigger once inside your foot. This makes your skin itchy and irritated. Your foot may also swell and get ulcers. Some people get gangrene or tetanus. Chigoe fleas live in sandy, tropical places, and aren’t common in the United States.

Sparganum

This tapeworm can grow up to a foot long in your intestines. It’s rare for people to get it in the U.S., but animals can have it. Most human cases are in Southeast Asia. Sparganum can live almost anywhere inside your body for up to 20 years. The infection doesn’t usually cause symptoms, unless it’s in your brain. Then you can have weakness, a headache, numbness, tingling, or a seizure.

Filarial Worms

These squirmers are way too small to see without a microscope. You get them when an infected mosquito bites you. They live in your lymph system and cause a disease called lymphatic filariasis. It can lead to fever, swollen lymph nodes, and a buildup of fluid in your body. Most people never have any symptoms, though. The worms are most common in the tropics. They don’t affect people in the U.S.

Screwworm

This pest isn’t a worm at all — it’s a fly. Adults lay eggs on a cut or sore on your skin. When they hatch, the larvae feed on the wound and cause an infection. Livestock get it more often than humans. It’s most common in South American and Caribbean countries.В

Naegleria Fowleri

This is called the “brain-eating amoeba” because it destroys brain tissue. It lives in warm lakes and rivers, and it can travel up your nose when you swim. Symptoms include headaches, fever, nausea, and vomiting. Later, it can cause stiff neck, seizures, and hallucinations. Most infected people die, but the disease is rare. Between 1962 and 2008 there were 111 reported cases in the U.S., mostly among young, healthy men.

Gnathostoma Spinigerum

This spiky parasite travels through your stomach wall after it infects you. It’s most common in cats, but people can get it by eating undercooked freshwater fish. You can’t catch it from a person who has it. The larva infects your stomach and liver first, causing pain. Then it moves to your skin, which swells and itches. It can be deadly if it gets into your nervous system. It’s mostly found in Southeast Asia and is rare in the U.S.

Ticks

These pests can dig into any part of your body, but they really like folds, creases, or hairy areas like your scalp. They can range from the size of a sesame seed to that of an apple seed or larger. They tend to hang out on tall grass and shrubs, and they hook onto you when you brush against them. Ticks cut into your skin so they can stick in a tube and suck out blood. The ones that carry Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever and other conditions infect you as they feed

Kissing Bugs

These critters get their name from where they like to bite — around your mouth and eyes. They usually attack while you’re asleep. They often hang out in woodpiles or rats’ nests. They’re also drawn to the lights and carbon dioxide in your house. They feed on both pets and people. Their bite can cause an allergic reaction. They also spread Chagas disease, which can be life-threatening.

Scabies

These mites dig tunnels under your skin and lay eggs in them. You can get them if you have close contact or sleep in the same bed with someone who has them. They’re too small to see, though. They prefer the skin between fingers, arm and leg folds, the penis, breasts, and shoulder blades. It can take up to a month for you to feel the itch. Your doctor will give you something to get rid of them.

Three kinds of them live on people: body, head, and pubic lice. These sesame seed-sized bugs grab onto hair and feed on blood through your skin. Mostly they make you itch, but they can spread disease. You get them from direct contact with a person who has them. Pubic lice can be spread through sex. Lice are very common. Treat them with over-the-counter and prescription medications.

Chiggers

When you think of critters that dig in, chiggers may be the first things that come to mind. But they don’t burrow. They attach to your outer layer of skin and feast on the cells. Once the bug is full, it lets go. This usually takes 3 days. In the meantime, the bites itch. A lot. Chiggers live in shady, grassy areas or on leaves close to the ground. They like areas under the tight parts of clothing, like waistbands or sock cuffs.

Up Next

Next Slideshow Title

IMAGES PROVIDED BY:

(1) CDC / Anna S. Kitzmann, M.D.В

(4) Philipp Weigell / Wikimedias

(7) Drs. D.T. John & T.B. Cole / Getty Images

(8) Joanna S. Herman, and Peter L. Chiodini Clin. Microbiol., American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

(10) Getty Images

(11) Getty Images

(12) Getty Images

CDC: Parasites — Loiasis

CDC: “Loiasis FAQs”

Pan American Health Organization: “Tungiasis.”

Heemskerk, J.ActaChirurgica Belgica, 2005.

Baron, S., editor,Medical Microbiology, 4 th Edition: University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston; 1996.

CDC: “Parasites — Lymphatic Filariasis.”

CDC: “AcanthamoebaKeratitis FAQs”

Center for Food Security and Public Health: “Screwworm.”

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service: “New World Screwworm.”

CDC: “Naegleria fowleri— Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM).”

American Association of Veterinary Parasitologists: “Gnathostoma Spinigerum.”

CDC: “Parasites — Gnathostomiasis (GnathostomaInfection).”

Lyme Disease Association: “About Ticks.”

CDC: “Life Cycle of Hard Ticks that Spread Disease.”

CDC: “Tickborne Diseases of the U.S.”

University of Arizona Department of Neuroscience: “Basic Kissing Bug Facts.”

Illinois Department of Public Health: “Mites Affecting Humans.”

University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment: “Parasitic Mites of Humans.”

CDC: “Lice — Pubic ‘Crab’ Lice.”

WA Today: “’Spiderman’ squished: Perth experts debunk spider burrowing claims.”

Foelix, R.Biology of Spiders, 3 rd Edition, Oxford University Press, 2010.

Bohart Museum of Entomology: “Spider Bites.”

Texas A&M University: “Chiggers.”

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner, MD on July 17, 2019

This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

WebMD Slideshows

View our slideshows to learn more about your health.

Bedbugs

What should you know about bedbugs?

Bedbugs (Cimex lectularius) are small, oval insects that feed by sucking blood from humans or other warm-blooded animals. The effect of bedbugs on human health and reports of bedbug infestations of certain hotels has received media attention in recent years.

How big are bedbugs?

Bedbugs do not fly. Adult bedbugs are 5-7 mm in length.

Where do bedbugs live?

Bedbugs are pests that can live anywhere in the home. They can live in cracks in furniture or in any type of textile, including upholstered furniture. Bedbug infestations are most common in beds, including the mattress, box springs, and bed frames. Bedbugs are most active at night. These pests may bite any exposed areas of skin while an individual is sleeping. Common locations for bedbug bites are the face, neck, hands, and arms.

Are bedbug bites painful?

A bedbug bite is painless and is generally not noticed. The bites may be mistaken for a rash of another cause. Small, flat, or raised bumps on the skin are the most common sign. Symptoms include redness, swelling, and itching.

How do you know if you have bedbugs?

Fecal stains or rust-colored dark spots, egg cases, and shed skins (exuviae) of bedbugs in crevices and cracks on or near beds are suggestive of infestations, but only observing the bugs themselves can confirm an active infestation. A professional pest-control company may be required to help identify and remove bedbugs from the home.

What home remedies and medications treat and get rid of bedbugs?

Home remedies for bedbug bites include measures to control itching, such as oatmeal baths or cool compresses. Typically, no treatment is required for bedbug bites. If itching is severe, steroid creams or oral antihistamines may be used for symptom relief.

Picture of Bedbug Bites

The first sign of bedbugs may be red, itchy bites on the skin, usually on the arms or shoulders. Bedbugs tend to leave straight rows of bites, unlike some other insects that leave bites here and there.

Bedbugs do not seem to spread disease to people. But itching from the bites can be so bad that some people will scratch enough to cause breaks in the skin that get infected easily.

What are bedbugs? What do bedbugs look like?

Bedbugs are small oval-shaped non-flying insects that belong to the insect familyCimicidae, which includes three species that bite people. Adult bedbugs reach 5 mm-7 mm in length, while nymphs (juveniles) are as small as 1.5 mm. Bedbugs have flat bodies and may sometimes be mistaken for ticks or small cockroaches. Bedbugs feed by sucking blood from humans or animals.Cimex lectulariusis the scientific name for bedbugs.

Adult bedbugs are reddish brown in color, appearing engorged and more reddish after feeding on a blood meal. Nymphs are light-colored and appear bright red after feeding. The wings of bedbugs are vestigial, so they cannot fly. However, they are able to crawl rapidly.

Temperatures between 70 F-80 F are most favorable for bedbugs, allowing them to develop into adults most rapidly and produce up to three generations per year.

Where are bedbugs found?

Bedbugs are found all over the world. Bedbug infestations were common in the U.S. before World War II and became rare after widespread use of the pesticide DDT for pest control began in the 1940s and 1950s. They remained prevalent in other areas of the world and, in recent years, have been increasingly observed again in the U.S. Increases in immigration and travel from the developing world as well as restrictions on the use of stronger insecticides may be factors that have led to the relatively recent increase in bedbug infestations. While bedbug infestations are often reported to be found when sanitation conditions are poor or when birds or mammals (particularly bats) are nesting on or near a home, bedbugs can also live and thrive in clean environments. Crowded living quarters also facilitate the spread of bedbug infestations.

Bedbugs can live in any area of the home and use tiny cracks in furniture as well as on textiles and upholstered furniture as hiding places. They tend to be most common in areas where people sleep and generally concentrate in beds, including mattresses or mattress covers, box springs, and bed frames. They do not infest the sleeping surfaces of beds as commonly as cracks and crevices associated with the bed frame and mattress, including mattress seams. Other sites where bedbugs often reside and potential infested items include curtains, edges of carpet, corners inside dressers and other furniture, cracks in wallpaper (particularly near the bed), and inside the spaces of wicker furniture.

Since bedbugs can live for months or even longer under favorable conditions without feeding, they can also be found in vacant homes.

SLIDESHOW

Are bedbugs found in hotels?

Bedbugs are found all over the world. Bedbug infestations were common in the U.S. before World War II and became rare after widespread use of the pesticide DDT for pest control began in the 1940s and 1950s. They remained prevalent in other areas of the world and, in recent years, have been increasingly observed again in the U.S. Increases in immigration and travel from the developing world as well as restrictions on the use of stronger insecticides may be factors that have led to the relatively recent increase in bedbug infestations. While bedbug infestations are often reported to be found when sanitation conditions are poor or when birds or mammals (particularly bats) are nesting on or near a home, bedbugs can also live and thrive in clean environments. Crowded living quarters also facilitate the spread of bedbug infestations.

Bedbugs can live in any area of the home and use tiny cracks in furniture as well as on textiles and upholstered furniture as hiding places. Bedbugs tend to be most common in areas where people;

  • sleep,
  • they usually concentrate in beds, including;
  • mattresses or mattress covers,
  • box springs and bed frames,
  • matttress seams and cracks,
  • curtains,
  • edges of carpet,
  • corners inside dressers and other furniture,
  • cracks in wallpaper (particularly near the bed),
  • recently used suitcases, bags, and other things that you have taken outside of your home, and
  • inside the spaces of wicker furniture.
  • They do not infest the sleeping surfaces of beds as commonly as cracks and crevices associated with the bed frame and mattress, including mattress seams. Other sites where bedbugs often reside and potential infested items

    Many news reports in recent years have focused on the discovery of bedbugs and their health effects (even in upscale five-star hotels), and a number of lawsuits have been filed by guests of fashionable hotels who awoke to find hundreds of bedbug bites covering their skin. Searching on travel-review web sites regularly reveals information and even photos confirming the presence of bedbugs in numerous hotels.

    Since bedbugs can arrive on the clothing or in the suitcases of guests from infested homes or other hotels harboring the pests, hotels can be an easy target for bedbug infestations.

    In addition to hotels, bedbug infestations have been found in;

    edbugs are found all over the world. Bedbug infestations were common in the U.S. before World War II and became rare after widespread use of the pesticide DDT for pest control began in the 1940s and 1950s. They remained prevalent in other areas of the world and, in recent years, have been increasingly observed again in the U.S. Increases in immigration and travel from the developing world as well as restrictions on the use of stronger insecticides may be factors that have led to the relatively recent increase in bedbug infestations. While bedbug infestations are often reported to be found when sanitation conditions are poor or when birds or mammals (particularly bats) are nesting on or near a home, bedbugs can also live and thrive in clean environments. Crowded living quarters also facilitate the spread of bedbug infestations.

    Bedbugs can live in any area of the home and use tiny cracks in furniture as well as on textiles and upholstered furniture as hiding places. They tend to be most common in areas where people sleep and generally concentrate in beds, including mattresses or mattress covers, box springs, and bed frames. They do not infest the sleeping surfaces of beds as commonly as cracks and crevices associated with the bed frame and mattress, including mattress seams. Other sites where bedbugs often reside and potential infested items include curtains, edges of carpet, corners inside dressers and other furniture, cracks in wallpaper (particularly near the bed), and inside the spaces of wicker furniture.

    Since bedbugs can live for months or even longer under favorable conditions without feeding, they can also be found in vacant homes.

    How do bedbugs spread?

    Bedbugs live in any articles of furniture, clothing, or bedding, so they or their eggs may be present in used furniture or clothing. They spread by crawling and may contaminate multiple rooms in a home or even multiple dwellings in apartment buildings. They may also hide in boxes, suitcases, or other items that are moved from residence to residence or from a hotel to home. Bedbugs can live on clothing from home infestations and may be spread by a person unknowingly wearing infested clothing.

    What Do Bed Bug Bites Look Like (And How To Get Rid of Them Faster)

    It can be difficult to identify bed bug bites because the red itchy bumps caused by bed bug bites look like flea bites or mosquito bites. Bed bugs usually come out at night and feed on the blood of humans. The tiny nasty pests can leave a cluster of bite marks on your face, arms, stomach, and legs. Some people only have a mild reaction to the bed bug bites and may only have a few small red dots. However, others have more severe reactions and are plagued by large red bite marks and an irresistible urge to scratch them.

    Pictures of bed bug bites show groups of red bite marks on the body. Very often, the bite marks left by bed bugs are in straight lines or in a zig-zag and very rarely is there just one solitary red bite mark.

    There are many effective natural home remedies to quickly get rid of the signs of bed bug bites. You can make your own natural treatments for insect bites with ingredients like witch hazel, apple cider vinegar, and aloe vera. The natural anti-inflammatory ingredients in those home remedies help to quickly relieve itching and promote healing.

    In this article, you will learn how to identify bed bug bites and find out how to get rid of them quickly. You will also see images of bed bug bites to help you to spot the tell-tale signs that you have been bitten.

    What do Bed Bugs Look Like?

    The Latin name for bed bugs isCimex lectularius, or common bed bug. If you’ve ever seen a close-up picture of a bed bug you will see that they look quite scary. However, in reality, bed bugs are tiny pests that lurk in corners and crevices of beds, mattresses, and furniture. They are about the size of a small apple seed and many can be seen crawling around if you have an infestation.

    Dr. Carol DerSarkissian on WebMD says that bed bugs have flat, brown, oval bodies. They don’t have wings but can quickly scurry over floors, ceilings, and walls. The parasitic insects live in groups and love to hide in dark places. If you have a bed bug problem in your home, you should check for signs of bed bugs in corners of your bed frame, along the seams of mattresses, along baseboards, and behind pictures. In fact, they will live in any crevice that is large enough to slide a credit card into. 1

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reports that bed bug eggs look like tiny white pinheads. As they go through their nymph stages they shed skins and these yellowish shells are a common sign to look for when checking for an infestation of bugs. 2

    Pictures of bed bugs

    How to Identify Bed Bug Bites

    On most people, bed bug bites look like itchy red bumps on their body. However, it can be difficult to know if the bite marks have been caused by bed bugs or not.

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the symptoms of bed bug bites may not appear for a few days. Also, each person reacts differently to being bitten by these irritating pests. Some people show no signs of being bitten whereas other people have a severe reaction to the bite, and large bumps appear on the skin that itch severely. 3

    However, Dr. Carol DerSarkissian on WebMD says that the only way to know for sure if the red bite marks have been caused by bed bugs is to look for signs of a bug infestation. That will confirm if the red spots that look like bed bug bites are in fact the result of bed bugs.

    Bed Bug Bites – Signs and Symptoms

    Images of bed bug bites generally show clusters of itchy red bumps on a person’s arms, neck, face, legs, and other areas of their body. Depending on the number of bed bugs that have infested your sleeping area and your reaction to them, bed bug bites also have other signs.

    Doctors from the Mayo Clinic say that more often than not, bed bug bites will be in either a rough line or in a cluster of red marks. If they cause a severe skin reaction, the itching can be very intense. In rare cases, a person who has many bites and a severe allergic reaction should visit a doctor. 4

    Doctors from the National Health Service say that, in some cases, the itchy red bumps on the skin can cause a rash or start to blister and fill with fluid. 5

    However, it can be difficult to tell if the bites have been caused by bed bugs or another insect. Therefore, it’s important to know how to identify the difference between bed bug bites, flea bites and mosquito bites.

    Bed bug bite vs flea bite

    Flea bites and bed bug bites look very similar and cause itchy red marks on the skin. Even in pictures, it is hard to tell bed bug bites and flea bites apart. However, there are some differences.

    The symptoms of flea bites generally appear on the ankles, feet and around the abdomen. As with bed bug bites, flea bite symptoms can also appear in small clusters. Dr. Carol DerSarkissian says that if you look closely at a bed bug bite you won’t see a small red dot in the middle as is characteristic of flea bites. 1

    Bed bug bite vs mosquito bite

    Both mosquito bites and bed bug bites can leave itchy welts on the skin. Doctors from the Mayo Clinic say that the symptoms of mosquito bites show up very soon after the bite; in fact, in only a few minutes, a puffy red bump usually appears. 6

    Unlike bed bug bites that are painless, you may feel the mosquito bite and it might start to itch immediately. It is also more likely that the mosquito bite will blister and ooze a small amount of fluid.

    Symptoms of Bed Bug Bites – Complications

    Bed bug bite marks usually heal within 2 weeks and won’t leave any permanent mark on the skin. In some cases, there are complications associated with bed bug bites.

    Of course, for many people, the appearance of red itchy welts on visible areas of skin like their face or arms is an unwanted complication of bed bug bites.

    One of the most common, and potentially serious, complications that is seen with bed bug bite is a secondary skin infection. Dr. Stephanie S. Gardner on WebMD says that itching from bed bug bites can be so severe that constant scratching breaks the skin and germs get it. This can cause a bacterial infection in the bite mark. 7

    Dr. Steven Doerr on eMedicnineHealth warns that some people experience severe allergic reactions to bed bug bites. Some of the signs of a serious allergic reaction include itching all over the body, tightness in the throat, chest pain, red bed bug rash that spreads from the bite area. 8

    At least the good news with bed bug bites is that they don’t spread disease. The CDC states that bed bugs don’t spread disease and the most serious health threat is a lack of sleep from scratching and secondary skin infections. 3

    Signs of Bed Bug Infestation

    If you suspect that clusters of itchy red spots on your body are the result of pesky bed bugs, you should check for signs of an infestation.

    First, you don’t have to worry that having bed bugs is a sign of uncleanliness or dirtiness. The CDC says that bed bugs only feed on blood and aren’t attracted to dirt. Bed bugs have been found in the cleanest of 5-star hotels. 3

    To check for signs of bed bugs, you should look in areas where they tend to live. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says that tell-tale signs of bed bug activity are tiny rusty-colored stains on bed linen from bug feces or dried blood. You may also notice tiny yellow shed skins around your bed and sleeping area. 9

    The next step to confirm if itchy red marks on your skin are from bed bugs is to find where the critters are hiding. You should check all joints and screw holes in your bed frame, around mattresses and box springs, and around the headboard. Other places where you might find evidence of a bed bug infestation are in the folds of drapes, in drawer joints, behind loose wallpaper, and at baseboards.

    If you find feces, dead bed bugs, or bed bugs crawling around, it is time to take drastic action to get rid of the bed bugs quickly. This is the only way to prevent getting more bed bug bites in the future. Some effective ways to kill off infestation of irritating insects include using bed bug powders that destroy populations of bed bugs as well as bed bug sprays.

    How to Get Rid of Bed Bug Bites Fast

    Fortunately, there are many great home remedies to get rid of bed bug bites quickly. Here are a few of the best ways of treating bed bug bites at home.

    Cold compress

    To quickly get rid of an intense itch in a swollen bump caused by a bed bug bite, you can use a cold compress. One excellent way to make a compress is by using a cold tea bag. Cold helps to relieve irritation from your skin by calming nerve endings, and tea helps to relieve itching and promotes healing.

    A study from 2012 into the healing effects of tea found that compounds in black and green tea have an astringent effect. This helps to reduce itching in irritated, inflamed skin. 9 However, you don’t just have to use black or green tea bags. Research has also found that chamomile has soothing properties and is just as effective as hydrocortisone creams (often prescribed by doctors to reduce itching in insect bites). 10

    How to use:

    To quickly get rid of the irritation that bed bug bites cause using a cold tea compress, this is what you should do:

    1. Put a tea bag in a cup of boiling water for a few minutes. Remove the bag and cool it in the refrigerator.
    2. Place the tea bag on the red itchy bumps to relieve discomfort and irritation.
    3. Apply the cold compress 2-3 times a day for fast relief from bed bug bites and bed bug rash.

    Aloe vera

    Aloe vera also has properties that reduce itching and help to speed up the healing time of a bed bug bite. Aloe vera contains many properties to nourish your skin and relieve inflammation and irritation.

    One study into the healing properties of aloe vera found that it has a soothing effect on irritated skin. It was found that aloe vera was just as effective as hydrocortisone creams in reducing itching and inflammatory responses in the skin. 11

    How to use:

    Aloe vera gel is great for helping bed bug bites to heal faster. This is what you should do:

    1. Use aloe vera gel with as few added ingredients as possible and liberally apply some gel to the bite marks.
    2. Massage the gel into the area around the bed bug bites to soothe the skin and stop itching.
    3. Apply the natural remedy 2-3 times a day to help your skin heal quicker and get welcome relief from the constant itching.

    Tea tree oil

    Tea tree oil will help to treat the itch in bed bug bites and help prevent secondary infections making the skin worse. Tea tree oil contains powerful antimicrobial compounds as well as properties that help to reduce inflammation and itching.

    One of the benefits of using tea tree oil to quickly treat bed bug bites is that it helps soothe allergic skin reactions. For example, theBritish Journal of Dermatologyreported on a study into the antihistamine effect of tea tree oil. Histamine is released by the body as a response to allergens. It was found that applying tea tree oil to skin inflammation helped to soothe the allergic response fast. 12

    How to use:

    You can use tea tree oil as a spot treatment on one or two bed bug bites or you can mix a couple of drops of tea tree oil with coconut oil to apply to clusters of bed bug bites. This is what you should do:

    1. Put a drop of tea tree oil on the end of a cotton bud and apply to the itchy bed bug bite.
    2. Apply 2 times a day to help stop itching in the bite marks and prevent bacterial infections affecting the skin area.

    For large clusters of bed bug bites, you can get relief by adding 2-3 drops of tea tree oil to a tablespoon of coconut oil. Apply 2-3 times a day to help your skin heal and treat any bed bug bite blisters that have formed.

    You can also use tea tree oil to make a natural spray for bed bug eradication.

    Other ways to get rid of bed bug bites quickly

    There are many other natural ways to get rid of the visible signs of bed bug bites. Here are some more ways.

    Witch hazelis a natural astringent that quickly soothes itchy skin and reduces redness. Witch hazel is perfect for treating bed bug bites and can be applied whenever your bite marks start itching.

    Apple cider vinegar, when it is diluted with water in equal proportions, helps to reduce itching and kill germs in bed bug bites. Just apply diluted apple cider vinegar to the affected area to stop itching fast.

    Cucumbershave an amazing soothing effect on the skin and will give you instant relief from itching and irritation. All you have to do is apply slices of cool cucumber to your bite marks.

    For more information on these natural bed bug bite remedies and to find out some more effective ways to treat bed bug bite signs at home, please read my article on natural ways to make bed bug bites heal faster.

    How to Prevent Bed Bug Bites

    Of course, preventing an infestation of bed bugs is much easier than having to deal with the discomfort bed bug bites cause.

    The CDC says that one of the best ways to prevent bed bug bites is to regularly check your bed, mattress, and bed linen for signs of bed bug activity. This can help you get rid of bed bugs before they become a major problem. 3

    Also, you should be careful of buying second-hand furniture. The National Health Services warns to avoid buying second-hand mattresses and if you do buy used furniture, carefully inspect it for bed bugs. 5 Remember, that in the right conditions, bed bugs can live for many months without feeding!

    Read my other related articles:

    Article Sources

    1. WebMD. Bedbugs.
    2. EPA. Bed bug appearance and life cycle.
    3. CDC. Bed bugs FAQs
    4. MayoClinic. Bedbug symptoms.
    5. NHS. Bedbugs.
    6. MayoClinic. Mosquito bites.
    7. WebMD. Pictures of bed bug bites.
    8. eMedicineHealth. Bedbugs.
    9. EPA. How to find bed bugs.
    10. Phytojournal. Tannins are astringent.
    11. OWM. 2011;57(5):28-36.
    12. Skin Pharmacol Physiol.2008;21(2):106-10.
    13. Br J Dermatol.2002 Dec;147(6):1212-7.

    Bed bug bites: What you need to know

    If you buy something through a link on this page, we may earn a small commission. How this works.

    Most people who are bitten by bed bugs experience symptoms that include irritation, sores, or itchiness. But how should bed bug bites be treated and can they be prevented?

    There are several ways of reducing the chances of getting bites, while the treatment options include good hygiene and antihistamines.

    This article explores bed bug bite treatment and prevention methods in detail.

    Bed bugs are small parasitic insects that feed on human blood.

    While they are a public health concern, bed bugs are not known to transmit disease through their bites.

    Bed bugs use a small tube-like structure called a proboscis to pierce the skin and drink a person’s blood. The pests are most active when humans are asleep, during the night and early morning.

    An estimated one in five Americans have personally dealt with a bed bug infestation or knows someone who has encountered the pests.

    Bed bugs can bite anywhere on the body where there is skin. Typically, bites tend to occur on areas exposed during sleeping, such as:

    Many people do not feel the bite itself or develop clear symptoms other than the dots where the bug bit and some minor, surrounding inflammation and irritation. Others are considered hypersensitive to bites and develop more severe symptoms.

    In most cases symptoms occur more or less immediately after the bite, but they can develop or progress over the following days as well. Without further irritation, symptoms typically resolve after a week or so.

    Almost all bed bug bites will produce some degree of discomfort, typically itchiness and inflammation. Other signs and symptoms of bed bug bites include:

    • a burning painful sensation
    • a raised itchy bump with a clear center
    • a red itchy bump with a dark center and lighter swollen surrounding area
    • small red bumps or welts in a zigzag pattern or a line
    • small red bumps surrounded by blisters or hives
    • papular eruptions or areas of skin with raised or flat patches that may be inflamed
    • small spots of blood from bites often dried or stained onto sheets or bed clothing
    • reddish or reddish-brown dried stains on fabrics due to bed bug droppings
    • white or clear skins, shed by the nymphs as they mature

    Individual characteristics of the bug’s bite and the person who is bitten also influence the resulting sore.

    While fairly rare, some people have or develop severe reactions and symptoms from bed bug bites. Serious symptoms that require medical attention include:

    • difficulty breathing
    • blisters
    • fever
    • feeling nauseous or flu-like
    • swollen tongue
    • irregular heartbeat

    Living with bed bugs can cause additional health complications:

    • Increased likelihood of infection: Due to the skin’s surface being compromised.
    • Sleep deprivation: The idea of being fed on can be extremely stressful. Given that the bugs only feed at night, some people will avoid sleep or will only get fitful or restless sleep.
    • Decreased wellbeing: A continual lack of sleep has been linked to feelings of depression, anxiety, general fatigue, and lowered immune function. The misconceptions surrounding bed bugs, especially the mistaken association with lack of cleanliness, can add to feelings of depression and low self-esteem.

    There are relatively few treatments options when it comes to uncomplicated bed bug bites.

    The first recommended line of treatment involves cleaning the wound, ideally with soap and water.

    For itchy bites, the following may relieve minor symptoms:

    • over-the-counter hydrocortisone, which can be purchased online.
    • anti-itch creams
    • antihistamines

    Most wounds heal on their own within a week, sometimes two.

    If severe swelling, inflammation, or itchiness occurs or persists, a person should seek medical attention.

    A dramatic immune response may be a sign of an allergic reaction. If this is the case, one of the following may need to be administered:

    • an injectable corticosteroid
    • antihistamine
    • epinephrine medication

    If infection occurs, antibiotics may be prescribed.

    Severe itchiness may result in further complications, such as infection or scarring. If severe itching is experienced, people may be prescribed corticosteroid creams and antihistamine pills or liquid.

    One way to help prevent exposure and potential infestations by bed bugs is to be able to recognize bed bugs and distinguish them from other pests.

    In a 2017 study, some 35 percent of polled American business travellers and 28 percent of leisure travellers were unable to tell a bed bug apart from other household pests.

    Common characteristics of nymphs (young bed bugs) include:

    • being less than than 5 mm in length
    • whitish-yellow and or clear-colored
    • invisible without a microscope or magnifying glass

    The nymphs are easier to see if they have just feed when the blood fills their abdomen, giving it a reddish brown color.

    Adult bed bugs are typically far easier to spot than nymphs. Identifiable characteristics of most adult bed bugs include:

    • an oval-shaped body
    • apple seed in size
    • a body that is fairly flat unless recently fed and inflated
    • reddish-brown to light-brown or tan color of shell, depending on how recently it fed
    • a length of 5-7 millimeters (mm)
    • three segments, an antenna with four parts, short yellow hairs, and unusable wings
    • a musty or stale-sweet scent released by glands on the underbelly

    Controlling bed bugs needs the identification and complete removal or destruction of the pest’s eggs.

    On average, one female can produce at least 345 eggs over her lifetime. Egg-laying females often increase the volume and frequency of feeding to support their brood.

    Common characteristics and signs of bed bug eggs include:

    • they are often laid in the same places where the female choses to rest
    • they resemble tiny barrel-shaped, pearl-colored specks, no bigger than the head of a pin
    • they develop a noticeable eye spot after a few days

    The key to preventing bed bug bites is to stop the insects entering, feeding, and breeding in human environments.

    In the daytime, bed bugs often seek refuge in the cracks and crevices of furniture, flooring, walls, and mattresses.

    The seams and folds of upholstered furniture can also offer an ideal hiding place. Bed bugs have been known to persist in vacuum canisters or units.

    The insects tend to pick hiding spots near human sleeping quarters, including bedrooms. Bed bugs found in other rooms are usually a sign of a severe infestation.

    Areas where bed bug infestations commonly occur include:

    • apartment or condominium buildings
    • large office spaces
    • hotels
    • vacation rentals
    • cruise ships
    • daycares
    • nursing homes
    • hospitals
    • college dormitories or housing units
    • public transportation, including airplanes
    • shopping malls
    • furniture or second hand stores
    • urban areas
    • rented homes

    Items commonly responsible for spreading bed bugs include:

    • used or secondhand furniture
    • new furniture or textiles exposed to bed bugs during transit
    • items of luggage
    • chairs or loungers where people fall asleep
    • bedding or bed clothes
    • moving or storage boxes
    • shipped items, especially if held at several locations or warehouses

    Bed bugs do not have a preference between sanitary, messy, or unsanitary conditions.

    They can, however, be found at higher rates in places, such as hotels, if infestations are not properly cleared.

    Add Comments: