How Do I Kill Bed Bug Eggs

US EPA

Bed Bugs

How to Find Bed Bugs

If you have a bed bug infestation, it is best to find it early, before the infestation becomes established or spreads. Treating a minor infestation, while an inconvenience, is far less costly and easier than treating the same infestation after it becomes more widespread.

However, low-level infestations are also much more challenging to find and correctly identify. Other insects, such as carpet beetles, can be easily mistaken for bed bugs. If you misidentify a bed bug infestation, it gives the bugs more time to spread to other areas of the house or hitchhike a ride to someone else’s house to start a new infestation. Learn about identifying bed bugs.

Bites on the skin are a poor indicator of a bed bug infestation. Bed bug bites can look like bites from other insects (such as mosquitoes or chiggers), rashes (such as eczema or fungal infections), or even hives. Some people do not react to bed bug bites at all.

Looking for Signs of Bed Bugs

A more accurate way to identify a possible infestation is to look for physical signs of bed bugs. When cleaning, changing bedding, or staying away from home, look for:

  • Rusty or reddish stains on bed sheets or mattresses caused by bed bugs being crushed.
  • Dark spots (about this size: •), which are bed bug excrement and may bleed on the fabric like a marker would.
  • Eggs and eggshells, which are tiny (about 1mm) and pale yellow skins that nymphs shed as they grow larger.
  • Live bed bugs.

Where Bed Bugs Hide

When not feeding, bed bugs hide in a variety of places. Around the bed, they can be found near the piping, seams and tags of the mattress and box spring, and in cracks on the bed frame and headboard.

If the room is heavily infested, you may find bed bugs:

  • In the seams of chairs and couches, between cushions, in the folds of curtains.
  • In drawer joints.
  • In electrical receptacles and appliances.
  • Under loose wall paper and wall hangings.
  • At the junction where the wall and the ceiling meet.
  • Even in the head of a screw.

US EPA

Bed Bugs

Do-it-yourself Bed Bug Control

Can you get rid of bed bugs on your own?

Treating bed bugs is complex. Your likelihood of success depends on many factors, including:

  • How many bed bugs you have;
  • How much clutter is available for hiding places;
  • Whether your neighbors have bedbugs; and
  • Whether all residents of a house or building will participate.

Getting rid of bed bugs completely can take weeks to months, depending on the nature and extent of the infestation. To be successful, everyone will need to cooperate and do their part.

The following steps will help you begin:

You may have to follow these steps more than once to kill all the bugs and their eggs.

Identify the Problem

  • Identify the pest:
  • Collect a sample of the pest to show an extension agentExitor other insect expert.
  • Extension agents can identify the pest at no cost to you. They are trained in pest control and know your local area.
  • If an extension agent or other expert says the pest is a bed bug, notify your landlord if you live in an apartment. The units near yours should be inspected.
    • Landlords may have a responsibilityExit to participate in treatment.
    • Check the housing codes and laws in your area.
    • Inspect all areas that may have bed bugs, plus surrounding living spaces, to find out the extent of infestation.
    • Develop a Strategy

      • Make a schedule for completing the steps below. Be sure to include any personal plans, such as vacations.
      • Keep records through the whole process. Note the dates and exact locations where pests are found. This will help you track progress and better know where to target your work.
      • Keep checking for at least a year after you’re done to make sure all the bed bugs are gone.

      Keep the Infestation from Spreading

      • Remove infested items. Place them in a sealed plastic bag and treat them. Learn more about treatment methods in the sections below.
      • Items that cannot be treated should be placed in a sealed plastic bag and left there for up to a year to ensure any active bugs are dead.
      • Empty the vacuum after each use. Seal the bag as tightly as possible and immediately throw it out in an outdoor trash container.
      • Discard furniture responsibly if you can’t safely eliminate the bed bugs. Destroy it so someone else won’t be tempted to bring it into their home. For example:
      • Rip covers and remove stuffing from furniture items.
      • Use spray paint to mark furniture with "Bed Bugs."
    • Have infested items picked up as soon as possible by the trash collection agency.
    • Don’t discard furniture if you can safely eliminate the bed bugs from it.
    • Prepare for Treatment

      Preparing for treatment is very important; it will make it easier to monitor for bed bugs that haven’t been eliminated. This preparation should be completed whether you are doing the treatment yourself or hiring a professional.

      Kill the Bed Bugs

      • Make sure the methods you select are safe, effective and legal. See What’s Legal, What’s Not.
      • Considernon-chemical methodsof killing bed bugs. Some will be more useful than others depending on your situation. These and other methods can be helpful, but they might not get rid of the infestation entirely:
      • Heat treatment:You can use a clothes dryer on high heat. You can also use black plastic bags in a hot, closed car in the sun, but success depends on your climate and other factors. Do-it-yourself heat treatments might not work. Professionals have access to more intensive and proven methods that can even treat whole houses with heat. You may also purchase a portable heat chamber, which is usually quite effective.
      • Cold treatmentcan be successful in the home environment if the freezer is set to 0 o F. You must leave the items in a sealed bag in the freezer at that temperature for four days. Always use a thermometer to check the temperature, since home freezers are not always set to 0 o .
      • Steam cleaners(wet or dry) can get into cracks and fabrics to treat carpets, baseboards, bed frames, and other furniture. The steam temperature must be at least 130 o F but should not have a forceful airflow, or it may cause bed bugs to scatter. Use a diffuser to prevent scattering.
    • If needed,hire a pest management professional or use pesticidescarefully according to the label directions:
      • Look for EPA-registered pesticides that have bed bugs listed on the label.
      • Use foggers (bug bombs) only with extreme care and only if bed bugs are listed on the label. Improper use can harm your health or cause a fire or explosion. Foggers should not be your only method of bed bug control. The spray will not reach the cracks and crevices where bed bugs hide. See Should I Use a Fogger? for more information.
      • Carefully look for any evidence of bed bugsevery few days after you complete your initial cleanup and control processes.If you see bed bugs, either the initial cleanup missed some bugs or eggs have hatched. Retreatment may be needed.
      • Consider using different types of pesticides if repeated treatments are needed.Desiccants (chemicals that dry things out) can be particularly effectivein some situations since they work by drying out the bug (which means the bed bugs can’t develop resistance).
        • If using desiccants, be sure to use only products registered by EPA as a pesticide.
        • Do not use pool- or food-grade diatomaceous earth(made from the fossilized remains of tiny, aquatic organisms called diatoms). This type of diatomaceous earth can harm you when you breathe it in. The pesticide version uses a different size of diatoms, which reduces the hazard.
        • Desiccants can be very effective but may take several months to work.
        • Evaluate and Prevent

          • Continue to inspect for bed bugs, at least every 7 days, in case any eggs remain. You can use interceptors, traps or other monitoring methods. Interceptors are placed under the legs of furniture to catch bed bugs and keep them from climbing the legs. Commercial and do-it-yourself interceptors are options.
          • Continue to protect your home from bed bugs.

          For additional information, please see : The following links exit the site Exit

          Contact Us to ask a question, provide feedback, or report a problem.

          What Kills Bed Bugs and Their Eggs?

          If you’ve read many of the posts on this site, then you know I’m pretty devoted to helping people figure out what kills bed bugs and their eggs. To that end, I not only actively help people I know, but I also go out and read what other people are finding that works, and what other people are recommending. And you know what?…

          There is a HUGE disconnect between what kills bed bugs and their eggs and what people are recommending, particularly on internet sites.

          Now, don’t get me completely wrong. There are some very good sites out there that offer some truthful and accurate information (and I like to think that KillAllBedBugs is one of those sites). If you search hard enough, you’ll definitely come across some sites that will recommend solutions and treatment methods that actually work. In the process, however, you’ll also find many hundreds of sites that are simply trying to sell you the latest bed bug spray.

          I’ve done so in other posts, but what I thought I’d do today is to give youthe most up-to-date information that we have on what you can use to kill bed bugs and their eggs.

          Note that I’m assuming you’re not hiring a professional exterminator – not because you shouldn’t – but rather because these tips are simply geared for people who want to treat the problem on their own and perhaps save a bit of money in the process. Of course, if you’re planning to give up on trying to kill your bed bug infestation by yourself and instead hire a professional, then please read our post on how to choose an effective bed bug exterminator first. But before you head over there, just be aware that even if you hire an exterminator, they may not be able to rid you of bed bugs completely (especially if they don’t kill all the bed bug eggs), and so you may have to return to this website and try some of the remedies I discuss below yourself.

          Let’s get down to business…

          So What Kills Bed Bugs and Their Eggs?



          This is probably no surprise, but heat kills bed bugs and their eggs. But before you go and start turning on the heating in your home, let me make it clear that I’m talking about a lot of heat.

          Sure, a little bit of heat might kill bed bugs, but what it won’t kill is the bed bug eggs. And those are the pesky things you should really be worrying about.

          I know this seems counter-intuitive, since you are probably dying to kill the LIVE bed bugs that are biting you every night, but in terms of treatment, if you can’t destroy the eggs, then you’re never going to succeed in your extermination battle.

          With that in mind, many things do not kill bed bug eggs, like mild heat or cold or bed bug sprays. Even you find a spray strong enough that it will neutralize the eggs on contact, you will never be able to be thorough enough to actually spray it directly onto all of the eggs, since they’re often hidden behind wallpaper, under the carpet, in light fixtures, etc. In addition, sprays generally do nothing to eggs in any case.

          So, how do you apply huge amounts of heat to small crevices in your home without destroying everything you own?

          The solution is to get a dry steamer…

          But don’t get just a crappy cheap one because they may not get up to high enough heat to kill bed bug eggs (yeah, those things are hard to destroy, hence why bed bugs are so hard to get rid of once you have an infestation). You’ll need to get a good dry steamer (like this Vapamore).

          I would get a dry steamer before I’d get anything else, and I’d use it extensively on my bed, furniture, floors, carpet, and even my walls (although be careful about getting wallpaper too damp, as it will loosen the adhesive). I don’t personally think that any one tool is enough to effectively eliminate bed bugs in every instance, but a dry steamer is one of the two tools that I wouldn’t do without.

          Yes, dry steamers are expensive (around $300 for a good one), but they will kill those bed bug eggs, and you’ll be able to use the dry steamer even after your bed bug infestation is over and done with just to clean your carpet or your upholstery (so not a total waste of money!).

          Another way to kill bed bugs and bed bug eggs with heat is to wash your clothes in hot water and use your clothes dryer function on high as well (watch out if certain clothes are delicate and can be destroyed by high heat). While your washing machine and dryer are unlikely to kill many of the bed bugs or bed bug eggs that’s plaguing your home, they might do some small damage, so it’s worth taking this small step.

          Ok, now we turn to the residual bed bugs in your home and deal with them using diatomaceous earth. Hopefully, with a dry steamer, you’ll have killed the majority of the bed bugs and their eggs. However, there is never any guarantee that your efforts will be 100% successful, so you’ll need something that will kill any bed bugs that emerge from hiding after you treat your home a few times.

          So, what is this magical diatomaceous earth that’s going to kill off all those residual bed bugs hanging around?

          Diatomaceous earth looks like a white powder (see photo above) that can be used in your home over the long term to kill any bed bugs that might reappear (e.g., new bed bugs that are hatched from a bed bug egg that wasn’t destroyed by the dry steamer treatment). Unlike most bed bug sprays, it lasts, which means you can put the diatomaceous earth down, and it will still kill bed bugs that walk across it 2 weeks later.

          This weird powder works to kill bed bugs by drying them out as they walk across the powder. So sprinkle it places you think bed bugs are likely to wander (corner of floors, under your bed).

          As an added benefit, diatomaceous earth is pretty cheap (this 10 lb bag is under $25!), which is really good news, because you’ve probably already spent a fair amount on a good dry steamer (although not near as much as you’d spend on a good exterminator).

          In the past, DDT was the go-to chemical for killing bed bugs, and it’s still used in many countries today. However, since DDT was outlawed in the US, we’ve had to turn our attention to other less environmentally hazardous chemicals.

          For example, the Eco Defense Bed Bug Killer spray contains what they describe as “completely natural, organic and non-toxic ingredients” that kill bed bugs on contact. However, we can’t determine the exact ingredients used in the spray.

          Another chemical that can kill bed bugs is simple rubbing alcohol. You can put rubbing alcohol into a spray bottle and it can be a simple and pretty effective (and pretty safe) method of killing bed bugs.

          Hopefully this article answered your question, what kills bed bugs and their eggs. Heat, diatomaceous earth, and various chemicals can all kill bed bugs and bed bug eggs. So, if you have a bed bug infestation right now, then you should go out and buy yourself a good dry steamer, a pack of diatomaceous earth, and some bed bug sprays. Just using one of these isn’t going to be enough for most purposes, so don’t rely on just one of them. The dry steamer is definitely a first must, but remember that it might not get everything. If you have urgent bed bug problems on your bed or places where the dry steamer might not reach, then try using the sprays too. Then sprinkle diatomaceous earth everywhere to kill additional bed bugs that might appear.

          Remember, treat, treat, treat!

          The point I want to make here is that whatever treatment method you choose (even if you don’t go with a dry steamer and diatomaceous earth as I’ve suggested), you need to treat multiple times, even after you think that you’ve killed all the bed bugs. Bed bugs live for quite a while without feeding, so they could easily be hiding in places that you didn’t treat (even if you aren’t getting bitten). Unless you keep treating and re-treating, you’ll just keep getting recurring infestations. Being thorough the first time makes sure that you don’t allow the stragglers to repopulate in your home.

          These are just the basics, and we really recommend that you put together a much more comprehensive step-by-step attack plan. I find that most people who have a strategy for how to deal with bed bugs and how to keep them from coming back are by far the most successful. People who act haphazardly and just buy every new product that they come across tend to kill some of the bed bugs and their eggs, but they miss some and generally experience many recurrences. Please don’t let that be you!

          Are You Ready to Permanently End Your Bed Bug Nightmare?

          What’s the Surefire Way to Kill Bed Bugs and the Eggs in Seconds?

          To kill bed bugs is to save yourself from a lot of problems. However, before you could eliminate them, there are several preparatory steps that you first have to take so you will know how to get rid of bed bugs. With all those problems and pre-elimination work, many think it is better to prevent the pests by using bed bug spray than to let them in and just get rid of them.

          If you don’t know what bed bugs are, you might think that all those steps to prevent their presence or are exaggerated. But if you have once experienced the problems they could bring, surely you would think otherwise.

          But bed bugs are unlike any other pests common to houses. They may be flightless, but they are fast-paced. And though they are small, they are sneaky.

          That means despite your preventive steps, bed bugs could still get into your house. But of course, that doesn’t translate that taking preventive measures is futile. In contrast, it is a great help in reducing the chance of bed bugs to infest. Nonetheless, it couldn’t completely protect you and your home from the said pests. Hence, you must always be ready to kill bed bugs whenever they get past your defenses.

          Why Kill Bed Bugs?

          As mentioned, bed bugs could bring in several problems. That is the general reason why you need to eliminate them.

          But, particularly though, you have to kill bed bugs so you could:

          • protect yourself from their bites

          By eliminating bed bugs, you are basically stopping them from feeding on you or anybody else in your house, even on your pet. It’s true, bed bugs are not known as vectors of diseases. However, their bites could leave nasty marks. Not to mention, to others, their bites could cause allergies and other skin problems.

          Because bed bugs have become so prevalent in the past few years, many fear they’ll be their next victim. They became so anxious and paranoid of the possible bed bug presence. If you eliminate the pests though, you could have a certain sense of peace knowing that you would not be bothered or bitten them. However, you wouldn’t be able to sleep well for long if you would not kill bed bugs right and continuously do the bed bug preventive steps.

          So how do eliminate bed bugs properly? It’s by eradicating even their eggs and nymphs.

          Kill Bed Bugs and Their Eggs and Nymphs

          Of all the house pests that you may encounter, bed bugs are probably the most annoying. Primarily, that’s because they are quick to re-start an infestation. And needless to say that will require you to repeat your bed bug treatment, which asks you to spend more money, time and energy.

          To avoid that, you need to execute a proper bed bug elimination. And by proper, that means you also need to eliminate bed bug eggs and nymphs as in a matter of days, they would hatch and grow. If you don’t stop that, a re-infestation will surely occur.

          Bed bugs have six life stages from eggs to adulthood. The adults and nymphs of the pests could stay out of sight for months after feeding so they are quite difficult to detect. However, the eggs are much harder to locate. Female bed bugs usually hide them in dark and deep cracks and crevices. The fact that they are very small, makes it even harder to search for them. So, if you need to implement a keen inspection when looking for adult bed bugs, you need to be more canny when looking for their eggs.

          Bed Bugs – Eggs, Nymphs, Adults

          Here are some tips that could help you find Bed Bugs Eggs

          • See pictures of bed bugs‘ eggs and nymphs. This will show what exactly you should detect apart from the adults of them.
          • Prepare a flashlight and a stick. They will help you find bed bug eggs easily.
          • Know the signs of bed bugs. Where they usually stay, there they lay their eggs.

          Read the Latest Bed Bug News!

          How to Kill Bed Bugs?

          Now that you know why you need to kill bed bugs and why you to have to include their eggs and their nymphs in the elimination, let’s now move to the “what kills bed bugs” part.

          There are actually several techniques of doing a bed bug treatment. However, you could generally classify them into two – chemical-based and non-chemical-based.

          In the chemical-based category, there are two methods included. Though we consider the two as different means, they both rely on the use chemical pesticides. The first method is by hiring bed bug exterminators who use strong solutions to eliminate the pests. It offers an easy yet expensive and risky bed bug treatment even if the exterminator use the best chemical to kill bed bugs.

          The second technique is by doing a bed bug treatment by yourself using a chemical solution. Though this method offers quick results and is a bit inexpensive, still this is a risky process. Like the hiring of an exterminator that uses chemical pesticides, it presents several health risks and could cause asthma, allergies, breathing difficulties and even poisoning. Another problem is that, studies about the said pests found out that bed bugs are now becoming resistant to chemical pesticides.

          On the other hand, in the non-chemical-based category, there are a lot more options. And because they are more friendly to health and the environment, they are generally the better bed bug treatment choices.

          What methods are included under this category?

          • Heat Treatment– this method kills bed bugs with heat. This could be implemented on clothes by putting them in a drier at a high temperature for 30 minutes. In a room, the use of heating devices could kill even the eggs and the nymphs of bed bugs at certain levels temperature at different durations of time. Ideally, to kill bed bugs in all stages, the temperature must be 115 degrees F or 46 degrees C.
          • Cold Treatment– as you could easily guess, this method freezes bed bugs to kill them. And just like the heat treatment, this could also get rid even the eggs and the nymphs of the pests. As bed bugs could still survive at -14 degree C, anything lower than that could eliminate them.
          • Vacuuming– though this method could work, it takes so much effort to vacuum all possible bed bug spots. Another problem is that vacuum sometimes could not reach the deep cracks and crevices where bed bugs hide.

          • Use of Organic-Based Bed Bug Spray– thanks to growing going green trend, there are now bed bug products made with natural ingredients. With them, you could now get rid of the crawlies safely, easily and inexpensively. However, you should take note that this method only works if you have the best-selling bed bug spray that kills on contact and is without harsh chemical ingredients.

          The Best Non-Chemical Bed Bug Treatment

          Given the benefits it presents to your health and the health of others apart from the elimination of the pests, it is clear that the non-chemical methods are the better ways to kill bed bugs. But as you might already know, there is more than a single way to eradicate the pests. Which of them should you implement?

          Considering the process of implementation, expenses, effectiveness and safety of each technique, the use of an organic-based bed bug spray is the best bed bug treatment, correct?

          But what is the best bed bug solution to get?

          Well, among others, you would want to purchase Green Bean Buddy bed bug killer. As stated in FIFRA 25 (b), it is a minimum-risk pesticide. That’s because it is made with organic-based products. More than that, pest-control companies already proved that they truly work withtheir continuous use of it. And with its new licensing agreement, you could also now enjoy its effectiveness, safety and affordability.

          Killing Bed Bug Eggs and Larvae Is Just as Important as Killing Adult Bed Bugs

          I f you were dealing with just one bed bug, your battle would be easy and short-lived. Unless, of course, that bed bug were the size of your cat, or even of a tarantula.

          But the real horror of bed bugs is that an infestation means you are fighting an entire, constantly reproducing, population.

          You must learn how to kill bed bug eggs, or else, even when every unhatched bed bug has been eradicated, your efforts will be in vain. And if even a single impregnated female bed bug escapes, the infestation continues.

          Read on to learn to identify bed bug eggs, bed bug larvae, and likely bed bug egg “hatch houses.” Find out how to kill the eggs before they hatch and become a mob of bloodthirsty little nymphs crawling atop your mattress at night.

          Table of Contents

          How to Get Rid of Bed Bug Eggs and Larvae

          Bed bug larvae will often be killed by the same insecticides or bed bug home remedies that kill adult bedbugs. However, the eggs will typically survive and will need treatment with a separate chemical or the same chemical, but about two weeks later when you can be sure all the eggs have hatched.

          Thus, you really need to read all bug bomb or spray chemical claims very closely. Each chemical or natural insecticide is different, some killing off eggs and some not.

          But, in reality, even though there are some anti bed bug treatments that kill some eggs, there really is no sure-fire chemical you can just buy and use to kill 100% of bed bug eggs for sure.

          Thus, you have to use heat or apply anti bed bug measures two (or more times) at proper intervals. There really is no other way. That could mean calling in a professional exterminator, but not necessarily.

          What Do Eggs Look Like?

          Perhaps, you may be thinking, “How can I fight bed bug eggs? I wouldn’t know a bed bug egg from a grain of rice.” Well, in fact, they look very much like rice, only smaller.

          Here are some features of bedbug eggs to help you identify them:

          • Grain-like shape.
          • Milky-white coloration.
          • About one millimeter long.
          • You’ll find one or a small cluster at a time.

          Bed Bug Eggs and 1st Instar Nymph

          But where will you find the eggs? Typically, there are hidden away (smart bugs) in inaccessible cracks and crevices. But, you may find some on your clothes, on pillows, on bed sheets, or on your mattress or box spring. It just varies.

          How Long Does It Take for the Eggs to Hatch?

          It normally takes less than two weeks for newly laid bed bug eggs to hatch. Six to 10 days is a good estimate, but it can vary based on temperature and other conditions in the environment (and “environment” here means “your bedroom!)

          Females will lay only between 1 and 5 eggs at a time, but they can lay up to five hundred eggs in a lifetime and lay them nearly every day!

          The Lifecycle of the Common Bed Bug

          Bed Bug Life Cycle
          4 Weeks – 5 Months Depending on Conditions

          Upon hatching, bed bug “nymphs, ” as they’re called, immediately head out looking for blood. Nymphs then molt and go through several stages, leaving casing behind on your mattress or in your carpeting (besides fecal stains, which is digested blood poop. Yuck.)

          No stage in the bedbug life cycle has wings, and you are always dealing with flat-bodied insects. The young ones are more transparent, except after a blood meal. The older ones actually change body shape, becoming long instead of circular, after the gorge themselves on blood.

          Bed bugs start 1.5 mm long but get up to 9 millimeters at full bed bug maturity. But they always remain immature “mentally” and keep on biting you and drinking your blood, from the moment they hatch to the bitter end.

          Can I See the Eggs?

          Bedbug eggs are hard to find and hard to see, but they are not impossible to see nor even microscopic.

          If you look very closely and carefully on your mattress, clothing, pillow, or any infested area, you may well spot some eggs. But you need not see the eggs to know they must be there and to take drastic action to destroy them. After all, wherever there are bed bugs, bed bug eggs are not far off.

          Can Bed Bugs Lay Their Eggs in Your Skin?

          Bed bugs are nasty parasites, but they do not live inside of people or under their skin, nor is that where they lay their eggs.

          You may have spied bed bugs in your hair and found bites on your face and neck. You may have sores on your ankles or legs or arms where they bit you. But you need not worry about bed bugs hatching inside of you. That’s one thing, at least, you can be thankful for.

          They can, however, lay eggs on your clothes. Click the link to learn how to get rid of bed bugs in your clothes.

          What Kills

          Again, there are many things that will kill some bed bug eggs, but nothing known to man will kill all of them. And you couldn’t be sure the treatment would even touch them all (hidden in crevices as they are) even if you could know it would kill every egg it touched.

          That said, here are two ways, besides pesticides that list egg-death as one of their virtues, that you can kill a “whole lot of eggs:” diatomaceous earth (DE) and rubbing alcohol. Read more about these remedies just below.

          Yes, if you douse bed bug eggs with DE (diatomaceous earth), they will die and not hatch, at least most of the time. And DE will kill off larvae, nymphs, juveniles, and adult bedbugs too, even if not always immediately.

          Here are some of the virtues of DE in your fight against bed bugs and their grainy eggs:

          • DE in a line creates a barrier that bed bugs will tend to avoid crossing, keeping them from laying eggs on the other side.
          • DE is non-toxic and all-natural. It is the discarded shells of tiny sea creatures called diatoms (think the white cliffs of Dover here) and is not earth at all.
          • DE will cut into delicate bedbug shells and either kill them right away or gradually dehydrate them over a period of up to one or two weeks at most. It will kill the eggs too.
          • No bed bug or egg can develop a resistance to DE. It always works.

          But don’t get pool-grade DE or DE mixed in with pesticides. Read the “ingredients.” It should say you are just buying plain old diatomaceous earth and that it is meant for use on pests. And wear a mask when applying DE to avoid breathing it in.

          Rubbing Alcohol

          Yes, rubbing alcohol will kill at least most of your bed bug eggs, if it can contact them.

          1. Rub it on your legs and arms and the back of your neck before you sleep to deter bugs.
          2. Spray it on your mattress and box spring.
          3. Spray it under your bed on the carpet and along the baseboard of your bedroom.

          This is a cheap, common product, and it can be a key player in your attempt to kill bed bug eggs and eradicate the population. But don’t use it alone. Make it a part of a bigger, broader bed bug action plan.

          What Should I Do With Eggs on Clothing?

          There may be bedbug eggs on your clothes. It’s possible, especially if you leave them lying on the carpet all day. But even in the laundry bin, they’re not immune.

          Bed bug eggs can be killed by washing then drying your clothes. The dryer is what really gets them more than the washer, but who dries clothes without first washing them? You will need medium-high or more as the temperature setting to kill the eggs (at 118ºF), but that depends on your dryer.

          What temperature can kill the eggs? Bedbugs die in heat. Eggs, nymphs, adults, all stages die, every last one of them. That’s why professionals with expensive high-powered equipment rely heavily on heat treatment to cure bed bug infestations.

          Heat your home’s interior or a particular room to 118ºF for about 70 minutes, and all the bed bugs, both hatched and unhatched, will be destroyed.

          That doesn’t mean they can’t come back, though, if your pet is bringing them in. So eliminate the source before doing a heat treatment.

          Steam Treatment

          Steam, if hot enough, can also kill bedbugs. Steam treatment can be used on mattress seams or anywhere bed bugs may be hiding. It can kill off their eggs as well.

          You would need special equipment to kill bed bug eggs by steam-power, however, so this would likely be a job for professionals. But you can find out the best steam cleaner for bed bugs in this article.

          In sum, note that what kills bedbugs generally also kills their eggs. DE and rubbing alcohol are two good tools, but insecticides or heat treatment can also be effective.

          It’s not absolutely necessary to call in a pro to kill off bed bug eggs, but if you are going to do it by heat or steam treatment, that’s likely where you’re going with it.

          Remember that killing bedbugs is only a temporary fix. Killing them and their eggs win the war permanently, barring a new “invasion.”

          You can find further details of Bed Bugs Control here.

          About Inga Cryton

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