How Does A Bed Bug Egg Look Like

What do bed bug eggs look like? Pictures of bed bug eggs

Bed bugs live for nearly 10 months and go through a life cycle from egg to adult. Infestations typically begin with a female bed bug who bites her victim for blood when she arrives in her new home, and after that for another meal 2 weeks later. Then, she would lay eggs at a rate of 3 every day. Eggs would hatch in 2 weeks. The newborn nymph starts searching for food immediately and grows into an adult bed bug in 4 months. The speed of reproduction and general life span is influenced by heat in the room and what is described above assumes a room at 68F (20C). Every female bed bug lays nearly 3 to 8 eggs at once and up to 500 eggs during her 10-month life. What do bed bug eggs look like? All eggs are 1/25 inch and oval-shaped. Bed bugs usually lay eggs in a sticky group. A nymph will drink blood 24 hours after hatching.

What do bed bug eggs look like?

Bed bug eggs and feces

Bed bug eggs are shiny and differ from slightly transparent to white. That’s what do bed bug eggs look like. They are laid both in bed bug harborages and places far from them (female bed bugs often lay some eggs away from the main population). They have a sticky surface when they are fresh. It glues them to surfaces and makes them look shiny. Bed bug eggs are nearly 1 mm long.

They are more frequently laid on wooden and fabric surfaces than on plastic or metallic ones.

Eggshells

Empty egg shells

Empty egg husks are definitely signs of an increasing multi-generational bed bug infestation. Despite their small size, they can be seen by the naked eye, especially with the help of a magnifying glass.

They resemble dried out casings of live bed bug eggs but are not so shiny and more flattened.

They can be discovered in the locations where bed bugs hide, usually on rough surfaces.

While none of these signs are 100% proof of an active bed bug population, bugs don’t vanish on their own. So think of them as certain clues of the infestation – but don’t stop there. You have to prove the presence of bed bugs themselves to confirm it.

Nymphs

Newborn bed bug nymph

Newborn bed bugs, also known as nymphs, have smaller size and lighter color than grown-ups. They can be almost transparent until feeding, when they become blood red.

Depending on their age, bed bugs vary from tiny size (like a pin-head or poppy seed) when they’ve just hatched to approximately ¼” as they become adults.

Nymphs are often the first live bugs that are discovered because they usually drink blood more frequently than mature bugs.

What Do Bed Bug Eggs Look Like?

Knowing what bed bug eggs look like could help you defeat an infestation faster—and help prevent the bugs from coming back.

Courtesy Dini M. Miller, Ph.D

A bed bug’s life starts as a tiny egg, barely noticeable to the human eye. But in just days, this tiny, blood-sucking insect will hatch and be searching for its next blood meal in you.

Don’t believe this myth about bed bug eggs

You may have already read on some websites that bed bugs can lay up to 500 eggs in a lifetime. That’s something to freak out about—if it were true. Thankfully, it’s not. Virginia Tech entomologist Dini M. Miller, PhD, says that number is from dated research but still circulates today. The reported 500 eggs were based on one bed bug in a lab that was very fertile. Here’s something you can believe—the real causes of bed bugs.

How many eggs do bed bugs lay?

Dr. Dini Millers’ research lab at Virginia Tech says the more meals the female gets, the greater the number of eggs she will produce. So, if she is able to feed every week, she could produce five to 20 eggs. But she might not get to feed every week, in which case she would produce fewer eggs. According to Dr. Miller’s research, bed bugs can lay up to 113 eggs in a lifetime, which can be around a year.

Male bed bugs get frisky after a blood meal

After female and male bed bugs get their fill of blood from you, they head back to the harborage (their home) to digest their blood feast and mate. Dr. Miller’s research tells us male bed bugs are particularly interested in mating after a blood meal. Afterward and for the next several hours, their sperm will migrate to the female’s ovaries and fertilize her eggs. Check out what bed bugs look like after they eat and when they mate.

Bed bug eggs are dropped

Courtesy Dini M. Miller, Ph.D

Bed bug eggs are cream-colored and have an elongated shape that measures a tiny one millimeter in length. The female can lay her eggs singly or in groups. “Bed bugs can ‘glue’ their egg to a surface and it can remain there until it hatches if in an undisturbed location such as a crack or crevice. They can be dislodged though, so they can be found on the floor if scraped off,” says urban entomologist Jody Green, PhD, at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. The eggs are usually pretty safe unless a human comes along with a scraper or strong vacuum to suck them up. Vacuuming is one way to stay on top of bed bugs. Here are some other things you should be doing to keep bed bugs out.

Bed bug eggs are tough

You would think something as small and seemingly frail like a bed bug egg wouldn’t have much of a chance, yet Dr. Miller’s research says that under optimal conditions, just about 97 percent of the bed bug eggs hatch. Insecticides sold at the local hardware store can’t penetrate the protective eggshell, says Green. Even diatomaceous earth, one of the home remedies for bed bugs, only kills nymphs and adult bed bugs—not the eggs. Here’s what’s lethal to the eggs: Temperatures above 120 degrees, or below 0. Green says some professional products may be successful at wiping out the eggs but only with precise and proper application techniques.

Hatching time

A new generation of bed bugs will hatch between nine and 12 days of optimal room temperatures—around 72 degrees—Green says. Hatching takes longer under cooler conditions. Once the nymphs emerge, they immediately start searching for a blood meal. “Literature has suggested that nymphs require a blood meal soon because they may desiccate. A blood meal will help them with moisture, but they can also survive by hiding out in crevices in optimal temperatures of 70 to 90 degrees,” says Green. Even without a blood snack, nymphs may live for two to four months. Check out some more secrets bed bugs don’t want you to know.

Bed Bug Life Cycle

Bed bugs are nocturnal, reddish-brown insects that feed on the blood of humans and other warm-blooded animals. These wingless insects have dorsoventrally flattened bodies that allow them to hide in areas such as floor cracks, carpets, beds and upholstered furniture.

A bed bug’s life begins with an egg, grain like and milky white in color. Female bed bugs lay between one and five eggs each day and may lie up to 500 eggs within one lifetime. Eggs are laid singly or in clusters and are placed within tight cracks or crevices. The egg is approximately 1 mm in length and is comparable in size to two grains of salt. Within two weeks, eggs hatch and immature bed bugs begin immediately to feed.

Nymphs

These young bed bugs, or nymphs, pass through five molts before reaching maturity. Although nymphs appear similar to adults, they are smaller in size and are not yet sexually mature. Young nymphs are also yellow-white in color, while older nymphs and adults are reddish-brown. In order to complete a molting stage, each nymph requires a blood meal. At room temperature, nymphs molt and become adults within five weeks.

Adults

Upon reaching maturity, bed bug adults often make weekly feedings.


Adult Bed Bug

How Long Do They Live?
The life span of a bed bug most commonly ranges from four to six months. However, some bed bugs may live up to a year under cool conditions and with no food.

Bed Bug Control

Cimex lectularius L.

Learn what Bed Bugs look like, and how to detect if you have a Bed Bug Infestation.

Find out how Bed Bugs infiltrate your home and where they are attracted to.

Learn about Bed Bug bites. their feces and how they can impact your health.

Learn how Orkin handles Bed Bugs, homeopathic cures and the cost of Bed Bug extermination services.

What do bed bug eggs look like?

Bed bugs are ectoparasites that feed on the blood from a host animal. Unfortunately, these disturbing pests’ animal of choice is a human. In order to produce bed bug eggs, the female must first have a blood meal. After this blood meal, a female bed bug is capable of laying large numbers of eggs. With continued access to blood, she can lay as many as 500 to 600 eggs in her lifetime. If you are concerned about bed bugs in your home, there are two questions you might be asking yourself: “What do bed bug eggs look like?” and “Where do bed bugs lay eggs?” Let’s examine the answers to each.

Physical appearance of bed bug eggs

What do bed bug eggs look like? They are very small and white to pearl-white in color. They appear to be shaped like a barrel and are about the size of a pinhead or a grain of salt. They are covered with a sticky substance, which adheres to almost any surface the female places them on. If the eggs are more than five days old, they will have a conspicuous dark mark on them that resembles an eye.

Common areas where bed bug eggs are found

Where do bed bugs lay eggs? Once inside a structure, bed bugs do not travel far to feed or lay their eggs. Most eggs are laid in protected sites, as close to a food source as possible. These pests can fit into a crack no thicker than a business card and lay eggs.

Bed bugs feed most often at night while the host animal is at rest. Since they primarily feed on the blood of humans, the most likely place to find bed bug eggs is on or near the bed. Look closely for bed bug eggs on mattress seams and joints. It’s also common to find them on the box spring and behind the headboard, if it abuts or is attached to the wall. Near these sites you will most likely find markings of red or black “specks.” These markings are feces from the bed bugs that consist of partially digested blood. Large concentrations of bed bugs may be accompanied by a pungent, sweetish odor caused by secretions from their scent glands.

Although it has not been proven that these disgusting creatures transmit diseases to humans, just the thought of having a bed bug infestation in your home sucking your blood is enough to make your skin crawl. Take the worry out of trying to identify bed bug eggs and trying to find where they might be located in your home. Call the pest management professionals at Terminix® for a free bed bug inspection today. They know how to locate bed bugs and eliminate them.

Bedbugs Slideshow: An Informative Look at Bedbugs

Don’t Let the Bedbugs Bite

As if you needed something else to worry about, bedbugs, those pests from the old bedtime rhyme are making a comeback. More of a nuisance than a health hazard, they’re showing up to suck blood from people in hotels, college dorms, and hospitals. Take an informative look at bedbugs: what they are, where they lurk, and how to spot them before they get you.

Know the Enemy

Bedbugs are small, flat, wingless insects with six legs that, like mosquitoes, feed on blood from animals or people. They range in color from almost white to brown, but they turn rusty red after feeding. The common bedbug doesn’t grow much longer than 0.2 inches (0.5 centimeters) and can be seen by the naked eye to the astute observer.В Bedbugs get their name because they like to hide in bedding and mattresses.

Am I at Risk for Infestation?

Bedbugs are most often found in hotels, hostels, shelters, and apartment complexes where lots of people come and go. Because bedbugs hide in small crevices, they can hitch a ride into your home on luggage, pets, furniture, clothing, boxes, and other objects. Bedbugs are found worldwide, but are most common in developing countries. Once rare in North America, they may be on the rise due, in part, to increases in international travel.

Feeding Habits

These nocturnal creatures can hide in beds, floors, furniture, wood, and paper trash during the day. We humans usually become their dinner during the night, with peak biting activity just before dawn.They can obtain their meal in as little as three minutes, after which they are engorged and drop off the host, then crawl into a hiding place to digest their meal. Bedbugs can live for 10 months, and can go weeks without feeding.

Signs and Symptoms of Bedbug Bites

Amazingly, these sneaky little bloodsuckers dine on you without waking you. You don’t feel their stealthy bite because they inject a numbing agent into your body, along with an anticoagulant to keep your blood flowing as they suck. The first sign of bedbugs may be itchy, red bites on the skin, usually on the arms or shoulders. Bedbugs tend to leave straight rows of bites.

Treating Bites

Bedbug bites do not usually require treatment. If a secondary infection occurs (usually from scratching), apply a local antiseptic lotion or antibiotic cream or ointment. Creams with corticosteroids and oral antihistaminesare used for the primary, unbearable symptom of itch. In these more severe cases, you may need to see your doctor.

Do Bedbugs Transmit Diseases?

Bedbugs are more of a nuisance than a health hazard. In a recent study, researchers reviewed 53 recent studies on bedbugs and their health and medical effects. The results showed that although bedbugs have been blamed for the spread of up to 40 different human diseases, there is little evidence to suggest they are carriers of human disease.

Bedbug or Imposter?

Don’t assume your bites are bedbugs. Bites can be hard to identify, even for doctors. Rule out mosquitoes, fleas, mites, and biting gnats by conducting a visual inspection. It’s best to collect and identify bedbugs to confirm bites. Look for the bugs themselves or their bloodstains, especially along the seams of mattresses. Further, look for dark spots of insect waste where bedbugs might crawl into hiding places on furniture, walls, and floors.

Bite Back Against Bedbugs

Professional exterminators should get involved right off the bat—tell your landlord, super, hospital administrator, hotel owner, or you call a professional right up front. The exterminator will locate the bed bugs (which may be found in more than one location) and exterminate as needed. YOU will have to do a lot of laundry.В

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(4) Mark Andersen
(5) В© Pulse Picture Library/CMP Images / Phototake — All rights reserved.
(6) Dr. Kenneth Greer / Visuals Unlimited
(7) Darlyne A. Murawski / National Geographic
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New York City Department of Heath and Mental Hygiene.
Ohio State University Extension Fact Sheet.
University of Kentucky College of Agriculture.
University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension Lancaster County.
Washington Post.

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson, MD on May 17, 2018

This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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