How Long Does Bed Bugs Take To Hatch

Killing Bed Bug Eggs and Larvae Is Just as Important as Killing Adult Bed Bugs

I f you were dealing with just one bed bug, your battle would be easy and short-lived. Unless, of course, that bed bug were the size of your cat, or even of a tarantula.

But the real horror of bed bugs is that an infestation means you are fighting an entire, constantly reproducing, population.

You must learn how to kill bed bug eggs, or else, even when every unhatched bed bug has been eradicated, your efforts will be in vain. And if even a single impregnated female bed bug escapes, the infestation continues.

Read on to learn to identify bed bug eggs, bed bug larvae, and likely bed bug egg “hatch houses.” Find out how to kill the eggs before they hatch and become a mob of bloodthirsty little nymphs crawling atop your mattress at night.

Table of Contents

How to Get Rid of Bed Bug Eggs and Larvae

Bed bug larvae will often be killed by the same insecticides or bed bug home remedies that kill adult bedbugs. However, the eggs will typically survive and will need treatment with a separate chemical or the same chemical, but about two weeks later when you can be sure all the eggs have hatched.

Thus, you really need to read all bug bomb or spray chemical claims very closely. Each chemical or natural insecticide is different, some killing off eggs and some not.

But, in reality, even though there are some anti bed bug treatments that kill some eggs, there really is no sure-fire chemical you can just buy and use to kill 100% of bed bug eggs for sure.

Thus, you have to use heat or apply anti bed bug measures two (or more times) at proper intervals. There really is no other way. That could mean calling in a professional exterminator, but not necessarily.

What Do Eggs Look Like?

Perhaps, you may be thinking, “How can I fight bed bug eggs? I wouldn’t know a bed bug egg from a grain of rice.” Well, in fact, they look very much like rice, only smaller.

Here are some features of bedbug eggs to help you identify them:

  • Grain-like shape.
  • Milky-white coloration.
  • About one millimeter long.
  • You’ll find one or a small cluster at a time.

Bed Bug Eggs and 1st Instar Nymph

But where will you find the eggs? Typically, there are hidden away (smart bugs) in inaccessible cracks and crevices. But, you may find some on your clothes, on pillows, on bed sheets, or on your mattress or box spring. It just varies.

How Long Does It Take for the Eggs to Hatch?

It normally takes less than two weeks for newly laid bed bug eggs to hatch. Six to 10 days is a good estimate, but it can vary based on temperature and other conditions in the environment (and “environment” here means “your bedroom!)

Females will lay only between 1 and 5 eggs at a time, but they can lay up to five hundred eggs in a lifetime and lay them nearly every day!

The Lifecycle of the Common Bed Bug

Bed Bug Life Cycle
4 Weeks – 5 Months Depending on Conditions

Upon hatching, bed bug “nymphs, ” as they’re called, immediately head out looking for blood. Nymphs then molt and go through several stages, leaving casing behind on your mattress or in your carpeting (besides fecal stains, which is digested blood poop. Yuck.)

No stage in the bedbug life cycle has wings, and you are always dealing with flat-bodied insects. The young ones are more transparent, except after a blood meal. The older ones actually change body shape, becoming long instead of circular, after the gorge themselves on blood.

Bed bugs start 1.5 mm long but get up to 9 millimeters at full bed bug maturity. But they always remain immature “mentally” and keep on biting you and drinking your blood, from the moment they hatch to the bitter end.

Can I See the Eggs?

Bedbug eggs are hard to find and hard to see, but they are not impossible to see nor even microscopic.

If you look very closely and carefully on your mattress, clothing, pillow, or any infested area, you may well spot some eggs. But you need not see the eggs to know they must be there and to take drastic action to destroy them. After all, wherever there are bed bugs, bed bug eggs are not far off.

Can Bed Bugs Lay Their Eggs in Your Skin?

Bed bugs are nasty parasites, but they do not live inside of people or under their skin, nor is that where they lay their eggs.

You may have spied bed bugs in your hair and found bites on your face and neck. You may have sores on your ankles or legs or arms where they bit you. But you need not worry about bed bugs hatching inside of you. That’s one thing, at least, you can be thankful for.

They can, however, lay eggs on your clothes. Click the link to learn how to get rid of bed bugs in your clothes.

What Kills

Again, there are many things that will kill some bed bug eggs, but nothing known to man will kill all of them. And you couldn’t be sure the treatment would even touch them all (hidden in crevices as they are) even if you could know it would kill every egg it touched.

That said, here are two ways, besides pesticides that list egg-death as one of their virtues, that you can kill a “whole lot of eggs:” diatomaceous earth (DE) and rubbing alcohol. Read more about these remedies just below.

Yes, if you douse bed bug eggs with DE (diatomaceous earth), they will die and not hatch, at least most of the time. And DE will kill off larvae, nymphs, juveniles, and adult bedbugs too, even if not always immediately.

Here are some of the virtues of DE in your fight against bed bugs and their grainy eggs:

  • DE in a line creates a barrier that bed bugs will tend to avoid crossing, keeping them from laying eggs on the other side.
  • DE is non-toxic and all-natural. It is the discarded shells of tiny sea creatures called diatoms (think the white cliffs of Dover here) and is not earth at all.
  • DE will cut into delicate bedbug shells and either kill them right away or gradually dehydrate them over a period of up to one or two weeks at most. It will kill the eggs too.
  • No bed bug or egg can develop a resistance to DE. It always works.

But don’t get pool-grade DE or DE mixed in with pesticides. Read the “ingredients.” It should say you are just buying plain old diatomaceous earth and that it is meant for use on pests. And wear a mask when applying DE to avoid breathing it in.

Rubbing Alcohol

Yes, rubbing alcohol will kill at least most of your bed bug eggs, if it can contact them.

  1. Rub it on your legs and arms and the back of your neck before you sleep to deter bugs.
  2. Spray it on your mattress and box spring.
  3. Spray it under your bed on the carpet and along the baseboard of your bedroom.

This is a cheap, common product, and it can be a key player in your attempt to kill bed bug eggs and eradicate the population. But don’t use it alone. Make it a part of a bigger, broader bed bug action plan.

What Should I Do With Eggs on Clothing?

There may be bedbug eggs on your clothes. It’s possible, especially if you leave them lying on the carpet all day. But even in the laundry bin, they’re not immune.

Bed bug eggs can be killed by washing then drying your clothes. The dryer is what really gets them more than the washer, but who dries clothes without first washing them? You will need medium-high or more as the temperature setting to kill the eggs (at 118ºF), but that depends on your dryer.

What temperature can kill the eggs? Bedbugs die in heat. Eggs, nymphs, adults, all stages die, every last one of them. That’s why professionals with expensive high-powered equipment rely heavily on heat treatment to cure bed bug infestations.

Heat your home’s interior or a particular room to 118ºF for about 70 minutes, and all the bed bugs, both hatched and unhatched, will be destroyed.

That doesn’t mean they can’t come back, though, if your pet is bringing them in. So eliminate the source before doing a heat treatment.

Steam Treatment

Steam, if hot enough, can also kill bedbugs. Steam treatment can be used on mattress seams or anywhere bed bugs may be hiding. It can kill off their eggs as well.

You would need special equipment to kill bed bug eggs by steam-power, however, so this would likely be a job for professionals. But you can find out the best steam cleaner for bed bugs in this article.

In sum, note that what kills bedbugs generally also kills their eggs. DE and rubbing alcohol are two good tools, but insecticides or heat treatment can also be effective.

It’s not absolutely necessary to call in a pro to kill off bed bug eggs, but if you are going to do it by heat or steam treatment, that’s likely where you’re going with it.

Remember that killing bedbugs is only a temporary fix. Killing them and their eggs win the war permanently, barring a new “invasion.”

You can find further details of Bed Bugs Control here.

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How Long Does It Take For A Bed Bug Infestation To Develop?

ByChris Williamson February 6, 2012.

I was recently sent to a job to inspect for Bed Bugs. Previous tenants had been treated for bed bugs and have moved out. Management wanted to know two things: How long has the unit been infested, and were there any live beg bugs. Inspection for bed bugs can be difficult as most units are full of furniture and belongings, this unit was vacant and empty. With full access to all areas of the unit the extent of the infestation was more clearly defined.

Bed bugs, the scourge of the rental industry, are small insects that feed exclusively on human blood. Long lived and easily spread, bed bugs secretive lifestyle makes detection difficult. Relatively few bed bugs start an infestation. In fact, if a male bed bug is the only hitchhiker, no infestation will develop. Only female bed bugs are able to lay eggs. A mated female can lay around 3 eggs a day if feeding is available, laying more than 300 eggs in her lifetime. Small white eggs are cemented to discrete surfaces, near a host, and hatch in about 10 days. Nymphs resemble adults but are much smaller. In order to grow, or molt, nymphs must acquire a blood meal. Depending on the temperature, it takes nymphs about 100 days for the five molts to occur before mating can take place. Roughly 1.5-2 months are required for a complete cycle from egg to mated adult bed bug. Adult bed bugs live about 10 months, although without a host, bed bugs may live over a year.

Bed bug infestations develop slowly. At first very few insects are present, feeding intermittently on the host and may not be noticed. Bites are sometimes overlooked or blamed on some other pest species like spiders. Secretive adults may not be noticed as they feed on sleeping hosts. Over time though, evidence builds up. Bed bugs are gregarious, and can be found living side by side in harborage sites. Great numbers of nymphs and adults can be found together. As these sites become more active, females will migrate to areas of less activity to lay eggs. Male bed bugs want to mate constantly with females, driving them away. This behavior is believed to be what makes bed bugs “spread out” into new areas. Large populations also use up more and more of the hiding spaces near the host, and are forced to seek shelter farther from the feeding site. All the while the bed bugs are pooping. Bed bug feces is little more that partially digested human blood. Fecal spots form as the bed bugs move about and accumulate in and around the harborage sites. Fecal spots are usually clustered, and may have a small “smear” at one side, indicating the direction of the bed bug’s travel. In heavy infestations there may even be a discernable, almost sweet odor, due to large amounts of feces and aggregation secretions. As bed bugs molt during the growth process, the smaller old skin is shed and a new larger skin forms. These skins are also left where they fall and may accumulate over time. In heavy infestations, there may be considerable numbers of these cast skins.

Now, back in the unit to be inspected, I am looking for evidence. I begin with a cursory look around. With a bright flashlight, pliers, and a screwdriver in hand I start with the ceiling edges and walls. As harborage sites become full, bed bugs will end up in corners and on walls. Right away I begin to notice some fecal spots on door frames and at lower closet edges. No activity behind outlet covers, or under carpet in the 2 bedrooms, 12-25 dead bed bugs noted on the bed room floors, some fecal spots on lower closet door and door frames, no live activity. Bases of all 3 hall closet door frames also had fecal spots, dead bed bugs, no live activity. As I began to examine the living room, there seemed to be more and more dead bed bugs, and fecal spotting, increasing as I got over to the baseboard radiator. Fecal spotting all over the metal housing and adjacent molding told me I was getting warm. When I dismantled the housing and pulled the carpet out from under it I hit pay dirt. 1000’s of cast skins, large pockets of blood stained carpet(major harborage site), and hundreds of dead bed bugs were deposited under the carpet and heating unit. There must have been a couch or bed right there. As the infestation grew, the bed bugs spread out along the floor edge and eventually found the bed rooms, where there was much less fecal spotting etc. In my opinion, the focal point of the infestation was the living room. As far as a time table is concerned, based on the life cycle, amount of fecal spotting, and the number of cast skins noted, the infestation was more than a year old, maybe older. 2 live bed bugs were found, although upside down, on the kitchen floor. This indicates that the treatment was working, and that bed bug control is almost complete. My recommendation was to re-treat the unit prior to new tenants moving in to ensure that the infestation is gone completely. If you suspect bed bug activity in your home, contact Colonial Pest for a free quote, or call us right now at 1-800-525-8084!

Bed Bug Life Cycle

Bed bugs are nocturnal, reddish-brown insects that feed on the blood of humans and other warm-blooded animals. These wingless insects have dorsoventrally flattened bodies that allow them to hide in areas such as floor cracks, carpets, beds and upholstered furniture.

A bed bug’s life begins with an egg, grain like and milky white in color. Female bed bugs lay between one and five eggs each day and may lie up to 500 eggs within one lifetime. Eggs are laid singly or in clusters and are placed within tight cracks or crevices. The egg is approximately 1 mm in length and is comparable in size to two grains of salt. Within two weeks, eggs hatch and immature bed bugs begin immediately to feed.

Nymphs

These young bed bugs, or nymphs, pass through five molts before reaching maturity. Although nymphs appear similar to adults, they are smaller in size and are not yet sexually mature. Young nymphs are also yellow-white in color, while older nymphs and adults are reddish-brown. In order to complete a molting stage, each nymph requires a blood meal. At room temperature, nymphs molt and become adults within five weeks.

Adults

Upon reaching maturity, bed bug adults often make weekly feedings.


Adult Bed Bug

How Long Do They Live?
The life span of a bed bug most commonly ranges from four to six months. However, some bed bugs may live up to a year under cool conditions and with no food.

Bed Bug Control

Cimex lectularius L.

Learn what Bed Bugs look like, and how to detect if you have a Bed Bug Infestation.

Find out how Bed Bugs infiltrate your home and where they are attracted to.

Learn about Bed Bug bites. their feces and how they can impact your health.

Learn how Orkin handles Bed Bugs, homeopathic cures and the cost of Bed Bug extermination services.

How Long Does It Take Bed Bugs Eggs to Hatch?

Bed bugs are quick breeders. Their numbers can increase rapidly in a number of weeks and their eggs are hardy and resilient. Once they have been laid, it doesn’t take long for the next generation of bed bugs to spring to life.

Basics of Bed Bug Eggs

Female bed bugs are only capable of laying eggs after feeding. However, as long as she has a regular intake of food she can, and will, lay plenty of eggs. The number of eggs that a single, female bed bug can lay throughout her lifetime may surprise you.

The average adult bed bug has the ability to live for up to an average of one year. If they have access to a consistent food source and are able to feed daily, female bed bugs can lay eggs every day, too. Following a single meal, a female might lay up to 20 eggs over a 10-day period.

These eggs may be laid in a group, or individually as she is on the move around a room. Within optimal conditions, a bed bug’s eggs have an extremely low mortality rate. Around 97 percent of eggs laid will survive and hatch successfully. Within 5-6 weeks, the nymphs could be adults and begin their own reproductive cycle.

The number of eggs that a female can lay means a rapidly growing bed bug population. The bed bug population in your home can double in size approximately every 16 days. This is quite an alarming rate of growth, especially if you are unaware of the problem.

Bed bug eggs are also very difficult to detect and see with the naked eye. They are typically around the size of a dust speck and white in color. It is unlikely that you will be able to spot them without a magnifying glass.

Due to their light coloration, the eggs are even more difficult to find, especially against a light-colored background. Once the eggs have been laid, they are very sticky and will adhere to almost any surface. This makes them great travelers if they have been deposited on shoes, bags or clothes.

What Conditions Do Bed Bug Eggs Need to Hatch?

The length of time it takes for a bed bug egg to hatch depends mainly on temperature. In optimal conditions of 70 degrees Fahrenheit, around 60 percent of bed bug eggs will hatch after six days. However, for more than 90 percent of the eggs to hatch, it can take up to nine days.

This time can increase by several more days if the temperature is not warm enough. When the mercury drops to around 50 degrees Fahrenheit, the eggs will take two weeks or more to hatch.

Factors That Prevent Bed Bug Eggs From Hatching

Temperature sensitivity is the main factor that can affect the hatching of bed bug eggs. When exposed to high temperatures, above 118 degrees Fahrenheit, the eggs will not survive. However, this temperature must be maintained for a minimum of 90 minutes.

Using heat treatment is a very effective method to target both adult bed bugs and their eggs. However, this kind of treatment usually requires professional help and may damage furniture or furnishings. Contact a pest control company if you are interested in finding out more about how heat can treat bed bugs and their eggs.

If you would like to try killing bed bugs with heat before consulting professionals, steam can be a great way to reduce bed bug numbers within many areas of your home.

If you’re looking for a powerful and reliable steamer for use against infestations and at a good price, the PureClean XL Rolling Steam Cleaner is a great choice. It’s heavy-duty, made to last, and produces a great covering of extremely hot pressurized steam – exactly what you want in order to kill insects and their eggs on impact.

This steamer can be used on a wide number of surfaces and objects, including mattresses, carpets, curtains, clothing, box springs, bedding and baseboards.

If you wish to take this one step further, you can try using a specially-designed bed bug heating system.

My favorite way to heat household items to a temperature that is sure to kill all bed bugs and eggs without needing to purchase expensive pest control heat treatment is to use a ZappBug Heater, which is specially designed to kill all stages in the bed bug life cycle.

Simply place infested items into the ZappBug heater and it will automatically reach the all-important bed bug killing temperature, so you can be sure the items come out all-clear.

Large and small versions are also available.

With regard to colder temperatures, bed bug eggs have the ability to remain dormant for up to one month. They will remain in a dormant state for that period if the temperature is too cold to hatch.

While you may think that pesticides will kill bed bug eggs and prevent them from hatching, you would be wrong. However, if the correct chemical is used, the bugs will die very soon after hatching. It is important to use the right chemicals to ensure that bed bugs do not survive after they have hatched.

Final Thoughts

The length of time it takes for bed bug eggs to hatch depends mainly on temperature. If they are exposed to optimal temperatures, they can hatch in less than a week. However, they have the ability to remain dormant if temperatures get too low.

Heat can work against them, and will successfully kill bed bug eggs if used correctly. If you’re looking to target bed bug eggs and prevent them from hatching, consulting a professional may be the best choice.

How Quickly Do Bed Bugs Spread?

Posted by Paul J. Bello – Certified Entomologist on August 03, 2016

With bed bugs becoming a major pest problem in homes, hotels and businesses across the country, many people are curious about how quickly bed bugs spread. Bed bugs do not fly since they do not have wings. They are able to crawl and rapidly move short distances within an infected area, and slowly spread to other rooms in the home or business.

Another way bed bugs move around is by finding their way into purses, backpacks, suitcases, briefcases, clothing, and jackets. Bed bugs rely upon humans to help transport them to new areas and locations where they are free to set up and establish new infestations. In fact, these traveling methods are the number one way people introduce bed bugs into their homes.

Once brought into the home, bed bug infestations take time to grow before they become a major headache. If you were to bring home one single female who has already mated, the new visitor will start to populate the home with new bed bugs. She will lay about 100 eggs over the course of the first month. Since her laying is spread out, by the end of the month there will be roughly 50 or 60 nymphs (developing infant bed bugs) and 30-40 eggs waiting to be hatched.

By the end of the second month, the adult population will have grown to around 10 breeding adults with about 200 developing bed bugs in various stages, and numerous eggs. At this point, you should start to notice small reddish-brown color dots on your bedding and mattress, and you may start to see small dark specks of dirt, as well as other minute particles. Catching and controlling bed bugs at this stage is beneficial, as things start to get out of hand by the end of the third month.

The bed bug population explodes during the third month of infestation. By now the colony has grown to over 100 breeding adults, 1,000s of developing nymphs, and 400-500 eggs. In addition, some of the adult bed bugs will start to migrate to other rooms within the home, since they can survive for approximately 6 to 12 months without a meal. If left to continue to grow and expand, the bed bug colony starts to turn into a major infestation.

Within six months of introducing the original pregnant female bed bug into the home, you could be facing infestations in every room of the home. Populations by this point will have soared to well over 8,000 breeding adults, 100,000s of developing nymphs, and 50,000-60,000 eggs waiting to hatch. Knowing how bed bugs spread and populate new areas, you can clearly see why prevention and early detection are vital to keep your home or business bed bug free.

You can protect your bedding, mattresses, and box springs, as well as other furniture in the home, with special bed bug encasements. These protective barriers stop bed bugs from getting into your pillows, mattresses, box springs, and furniture should you accidentally introduce a bed bug into the home. For more information about the bed bug certified encasements and other waterproof and hypoallergenic mattress and bedding products, contact Mattress Safe® now at 770-205-5335.

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