How To Treat Bed Bugs Yourself

US EPA

Bed Bugs

Do-it-yourself Bed Bug Control

Can you get rid of bed bugs on your own?

Treating bed bugs is complex. Your likelihood of success depends on many factors, including:

  • How many bed bugs you have;
  • How much clutter is available for hiding places;
  • Whether your neighbors have bedbugs; and
  • Whether all residents of a house or building will participate.

Getting rid of bed bugs completely can take weeks to months, depending on the nature and extent of the infestation. To be successful, everyone will need to cooperate and do their part.

The following steps will help you begin:

You may have to follow these steps more than once to kill all the bugs and their eggs.

Identify the Problem

  • Identify the pest:
  • Collect a sample of the pest to show an extension agentExitor other insect expert.
  • Extension agents can identify the pest at no cost to you. They are trained in pest control and know your local area.
  • If an extension agent or other expert says the pest is a bed bug, notify your landlord if you live in an apartment. The units near yours should be inspected.
    • Landlords may have a responsibilityExit to participate in treatment.
    • Check the housing codes and laws in your area.
    • Inspect all areas that may have bed bugs, plus surrounding living spaces, to find out the extent of infestation.
    • Develop a Strategy

      • Make a schedule for completing the steps below. Be sure to include any personal plans, such as vacations.
      • Keep records through the whole process. Note the dates and exact locations where pests are found. This will help you track progress and better know where to target your work.
      • Keep checking for at least a year after you’re done to make sure all the bed bugs are gone.

      Keep the Infestation from Spreading

      • Remove infested items. Place them in a sealed plastic bag and treat them. Learn more about treatment methods in the sections below.
      • Items that cannot be treated should be placed in a sealed plastic bag and left there for up to a year to ensure any active bugs are dead.
      • Empty the vacuum after each use. Seal the bag as tightly as possible and immediately throw it out in an outdoor trash container.
      • Discard furniture responsibly if you can’t safely eliminate the bed bugs. Destroy it so someone else won’t be tempted to bring it into their home. For example:
      • Rip covers and remove stuffing from furniture items.
      • Use spray paint to mark furniture with "Bed Bugs."
    • Have infested items picked up as soon as possible by the trash collection agency.
    • Don’t discard furniture if you can safely eliminate the bed bugs from it.
    • Prepare for Treatment

      Preparing for treatment is very important; it will make it easier to monitor for bed bugs that haven’t been eliminated. This preparation should be completed whether you are doing the treatment yourself or hiring a professional.

      Kill the Bed Bugs

      • Make sure the methods you select are safe, effective and legal. See What’s Legal, What’s Not.
      • Considernon-chemical methodsof killing bed bugs. Some will be more useful than others depending on your situation. These and other methods can be helpful, but they might not get rid of the infestation entirely:
      • Heat treatment:You can use a clothes dryer on high heat. You can also use black plastic bags in a hot, closed car in the sun, but success depends on your climate and other factors. Do-it-yourself heat treatments might not work. Professionals have access to more intensive and proven methods that can even treat whole houses with heat. You may also purchase a portable heat chamber, which is usually quite effective.
      • Cold treatmentcan be successful in the home environment if the freezer is set to 0 o F. You must leave the items in a sealed bag in the freezer at that temperature for four days. Always use a thermometer to check the temperature, since home freezers are not always set to 0 o .
      • Steam cleaners(wet or dry) can get into cracks and fabrics to treat carpets, baseboards, bed frames, and other furniture. The steam temperature must be at least 130 o F but should not have a forceful airflow, or it may cause bed bugs to scatter. Use a diffuser to prevent scattering.
    • If needed,hire a pest management professional or use pesticidescarefully according to the label directions:
      • Look for EPA-registered pesticides that have bed bugs listed on the label.
      • Use foggers (bug bombs) only with extreme care and only if bed bugs are listed on the label. Improper use can harm your health or cause a fire or explosion. Foggers should not be your only method of bed bug control. The spray will not reach the cracks and crevices where bed bugs hide. See Should I Use a Fogger? for more information.
      • Carefully look for any evidence of bed bugsevery few days after you complete your initial cleanup and control processes.If you see bed bugs, either the initial cleanup missed some bugs or eggs have hatched. Retreatment may be needed.
      • Consider using different types of pesticides if repeated treatments are needed.Desiccants (chemicals that dry things out) can be particularly effectivein some situations since they work by drying out the bug (which means the bed bugs can’t develop resistance).
        • If using desiccants, be sure to use only products registered by EPA as a pesticide.
        • Do not use pool- or food-grade diatomaceous earth(made from the fossilized remains of tiny, aquatic organisms called diatoms). This type of diatomaceous earth can harm you when you breathe it in. The pesticide version uses a different size of diatoms, which reduces the hazard.
        • Desiccants can be very effective but may take several months to work.
        • Evaluate and Prevent

          • Continue to inspect for bed bugs, at least every 7 days, in case any eggs remain. You can use interceptors, traps or other monitoring methods. Interceptors are placed under the legs of furniture to catch bed bugs and keep them from climbing the legs. Commercial and do-it-yourself interceptors are options.
          • Continue to protect your home from bed bugs.

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          How To Kill Bed Bugs (Treating Bed Bugs Yourself)

          “How to kill bed bugs” is one of the most popular questions in regards to bed bugs so I figured I ‘d offer some insight into how it can be done. As mentioned in some of our other posts, bed bugs can be treated through a professional exterminator or by doing it yourself. Doing it yourself is cheaper, but requires more work on your part. Using a pest control takes far less time and some even offer a warranty against bed bugs for a period of time, but using a professional is quite expensive. The choice is up to you. The following post describes what you will need to treat bed bugs yourself using readily available products and pesticides.

          Treating bed bugs yourself without an exterminator is not for everyone, but it can be done successfully by following a few steps.

          Step 1:Collect clothing and place them into trash bags where they can then be carried to the dryer. A home dryer on high heat can kill all stages of bed bugs and is a great way to treat clothing and fabric items. Dry clean only items can be dry cleaned or placed in a PackTite heat treatment device.

          Be sure not to re-use the garbage bags for risk of re-infesting your treated clothing. Treated clothing should be stored in garbage bags or preferably Hefty Big Bags until the infestation is no longer.

          Step 2: Use a Packtite heat treatment device to treat personal items that cannot be placed in the dryer. The PackTite uses heat to kill bed bugs with each treatment taking about 2-4 hours to complete.

          Step 3: Remove your mattress and box spring from the bed and use a residual spray such as Bedlam Bed Bug Spray or steam to treat cracks and crevices in the bed frame where bed bugs or eggs could be.

          Step 4: Apply bed bug certified mattress and box spring encasements to reduce hiding spots for bed bugs and to seal in any bed bugs that could be hiding inside the box spring or mattress. STERI-FAB, steam or Bedlam can be used to treat the mattress before the encasements are applied. Be sure to allow the mattress and box spring to fully dry before applying the encasements. After washing and drying your bed sheets put the bedding back on the mattress. We don’t suggest using a bed skirt as that could provide a way for bed bugs to get into the bed an will lead us to step 6.

          Step 5:Apply Climbup Insect Interceptors to each castor or wheel of the frame. Climbup Interceptors will help prevent the bed bugs from getting into your now bed bug free bed. Climbup Interceptors have an outer ring that traps bed bug as they attempt to get into or out of the bed. This can significantly reduce bed bug bites and is an important step.

          Step 6:Reduce clutter in the infested room and treat personal items with a PackTite heat treatment device. This includes shoes, papers, books toys, or just about anything that can be heated up to 140 degree Fahrenheit. Electronics should not be placed inside. Treated items can be placed in sealed garbage backs or hefty big bags until the bed bugs are gone.

          Step 7:Use a steamer to treat carpeting, chairs, fabric items, furniture along with cracks and crevices including the perimeter of the room (baseboards). Be careful steam is hot!

          Step 8:Apply a good residual spray such as J.T Eaton Kills Bed Bugs II or Bedlam Bed Bug Spray lightly to the inside tracks of drawers, the bottom edge of furniture, behind furniture, cracks and crevices and places where bed bugs could be. A mask and goggles are recommended and always adhere to the product label, directions and safety procedures.

          Step 9:Apply DE or diatomaceous to cracks and crevices. Less is more and we don’t recommend using it all over the carpeting. If you apply it correctly you shouldn’t really see it. Great places to put DE is between the carpeting and the baseboard, inside the wall by access of the electrical outlets (turn the power off prior to application and don’t put DE in the electrical outlet!). Although DE is natural, you don’t want to breathe it in so a mask and goggles are necessary. Always read the labels safety information. DE should be applied after the residual pesticide has completely dried. DE cannot get wet or will not work.

          Step 10:Every two weeks for 3 treatments vacuum up the powder, apply a new application of residual pesticide, allow to dry and then apply fresh powder. DE goes a long way so you shouldn’t need more than about 16 ounces.

          This is a very brief summary of how to kill bed bugs. If you have any detailed questions or comments please leave a comment.

          How To Kill Bed Bugs (Treating Bed Bugs Yourself)

          “How to kill bed bugs” is one of the most popular questions in regards to bed bugs so I figured I ‘d offer some insight into how it can be done. As mentioned in some of our other posts, bed bugs can be treated through a professional exterminator or by doing it yourself. Doing it yourself is cheaper, but requires more work on your part. Using a pest control takes far less time and some even offer a warranty against bed bugs for a period of time, but using a professional is quite expensive. The choice is up to you. The following post describes what you will need to treat bed bugs yourself using readily available products and pesticides.

          Treating bed bugs yourself without an exterminator is not for everyone, but it can be done successfully by following a few steps.

          Step 1:Collect clothing and place them into trash bags where they can then be carried to the dryer. A home dryer on high heat can kill all stages of bed bugs and is a great way to treat clothing and fabric items. Dry clean only items can be dry cleaned or placed in a PackTite heat treatment device.

          Be sure not to re-use the garbage bags for risk of re-infesting your treated clothing. Treated clothing should be stored in garbage bags or preferably Hefty Big Bags until the infestation is no longer.

          Step 2: Use a Packtite heat treatment device to treat personal items that cannot be placed in the dryer. The PackTite uses heat to kill bed bugs with each treatment taking about 2-4 hours to complete.

          Step 3: Remove your mattress and box spring from the bed and use a residual spray such as Bedlam Bed Bug Spray or steam to treat cracks and crevices in the bed frame where bed bugs or eggs could be.

          Step 4: Apply bed bug certified mattress and box spring encasements to reduce hiding spots for bed bugs and to seal in any bed bugs that could be hiding inside the box spring or mattress. STERI-FAB, steam or Bedlam can be used to treat the mattress before the encasements are applied. Be sure to allow the mattress and box spring to fully dry before applying the encasements. After washing and drying your bed sheets put the bedding back on the mattress. We don’t suggest using a bed skirt as that could provide a way for bed bugs to get into the bed an will lead us to step 6.

          Step 5:Apply Climbup Insect Interceptors to each castor or wheel of the frame. Climbup Interceptors will help prevent the bed bugs from getting into your now bed bug free bed. Climbup Interceptors have an outer ring that traps bed bug as they attempt to get into or out of the bed. This can significantly reduce bed bug bites and is an important step.

          Step 6:Reduce clutter in the infested room and treat personal items with a PackTite heat treatment device. This includes shoes, papers, books toys, or just about anything that can be heated up to 140 degree Fahrenheit. Electronics should not be placed inside. Treated items can be placed in sealed garbage backs or hefty big bags until the bed bugs are gone.

          Step 7:Use a steamer to treat carpeting, chairs, fabric items, furniture along with cracks and crevices including the perimeter of the room (baseboards). Be careful steam is hot!

          Step 8:Apply a good residual spray such as J.T Eaton Kills Bed Bugs II or Bedlam Bed Bug Spray lightly to the inside tracks of drawers, the bottom edge of furniture, behind furniture, cracks and crevices and places where bed bugs could be. A mask and goggles are recommended and always adhere to the product label, directions and safety procedures.

          Step 9:Apply DE or diatomaceous to cracks and crevices. Less is more and we don’t recommend using it all over the carpeting. If you apply it correctly you shouldn’t really see it. Great places to put DE is between the carpeting and the baseboard, inside the wall by access of the electrical outlets (turn the power off prior to application and don’t put DE in the electrical outlet!). Although DE is natural, you don’t want to breathe it in so a mask and goggles are necessary. Always read the labels safety information. DE should be applied after the residual pesticide has completely dried. DE cannot get wet or will not work.

          Step 10:Every two weeks for 3 treatments vacuum up the powder, apply a new application of residual pesticide, allow to dry and then apply fresh powder. DE goes a long way so you shouldn’t need more than about 16 ounces.

          This is a very brief summary of how to kill bed bugs. If you have any detailed questions or comments please leave a comment.

          Bedbugs

          In this Article

          In this Article

          In this Article

          Bedbugs are small, oval, brownish insects that live on the blood of animals or humans. Adult bedbugs have flat bodies about the size of an apple seed. After feeding, however, their bodies swell and are a reddish color.

          Bedbugs do not fly, but they can move quickly over floors, walls, and ceilings. Female bedbugs may lay hundreds of eggs, each of which is about the size of a speck of dust, over a lifetime.

          Immature bedbugs, called nymphs, shed their skins five times before reaching maturity and require a meal of blood before each shedding. Under favorable conditions the bugs can develop fully in as little as a month and produce three or more generations per year.

          Although they are a nuisance, they are not thought to transmit diseases.

          Where Bed Bugs Hide

          Bedbugs may enter your home undetected through luggage, clothing, used beds and couches, and other items. Their flattened bodies make it possible for them to fit into tiny spaces, about the width of a credit card. Bedbugs do not have nests like ants or bees, but tend to live in groups in hiding places. Their initial hiding places are typically in mattresses, box springs, bed frames, and headboards where they have easy access to people to bite in the night.

          Over time, however, they may scatter through the bedroom, moving into any crevice or protected location. They may also spread to nearby rooms or apartments.

          Because bedbugs live solely on blood, having them in your home is not a sign of dirtiness. You are as likely to find them in immaculate homes and hotel rooms as in filthy ones.

          When Bedbugs Bite

          Bedbugs are active mainly at night and usually bite people while they are sleeping. They feed by piercing the skin and withdrawing blood through an elongated beak. The bugs feed from three to 10 minutes to become engorged and then crawl away unnoticed.

          Most bedbug bites are painless at first, but later turn into itchy welts. Unlike flea bites that are mainly around the ankles, bedbug bites are on any area of skin exposed while sleeping. Also, the bites do not have a red spot in the center like flea bites do.

          People who don’t realize they have a bedbug infestation may attribute the itching and welts to other causes, such as mosquitoes. To confirm bedbug bites, you must find and identify the bugs themselves.

          Continued

          Signs of Infestation

          If you wake up with itchy areas you didn’t have when you went to sleep, you may have bedbugs, particularly if you got a used bed or other used furniture around the time the bites started. Other signs that you have bedbugs include:

          • Blood stains on your sheets or pillowcases
          • Dark or rusty spots of bedbug excrement on sheets and mattresses, bed clothes, and walls
          • Bedbug fecal spots, egg shells, or shed skins in areas where bedbugs hide
          • An offensive, musty odor from the bugs’ scent glands

          If you suspect an infestation, remove all bedding and check it carefully for signs of the bugs or their excrement. Remove the dust cover over the bottom of the box springs and examine the seams in the wood framing. Peel back the fabric where it is stapled to the wood frame.

          Also, check the area around the bed, including inside books, telephones or radios, the edge of the carpet, and even in electrical outlets. Check your closet, because bedbugs can attach to clothing. If you are uncertain about signs of bedbugs, call an exterminator, who will know what to look for.

          If you find signs of infestation, begin steps to get rid of the bugs and prevent their return.

          Bedbug Treatments

          Getting rid of bedbugs begins with cleaning up the places where bedbugs live. This should include the following:

          • Clean bedding, linens, curtains, and clothing in hot water and dry them on the highest dryer setting. Place stuffed animals, shoes, and other items that can’t be washed in the dryer and run on high for 30 minutes.
          • Use a stiff brush to scrub mattress seams to remove bedbugs and their eggs before vacuuming.
          • Vacuum your bed and surrounding area frequently. After vacuuming, immediately place the vacuum cleaner bag in a plastic bag and place in garbage can outdoors.
          • Encase mattress and box springs with a tightly woven, zippered cover to keep bedbugs from entering or escaping. Bedbugs may live up to a year without feeding, so keep the cover on your mattress for at least a year to make sure all bugs in the mattress are dead.
          • Repair cracks in plaster and glue down peeling wallpaper to get rid of places bedbugs can hide.
          • Get rid of clutter around the bed.

          If your mattress is infested, you may want to get rid of it and get a new one, but take care to rid the rest of your home of bedbugs or they will infest your new mattress.

          Continued

          Bedbug Extermination

          While cleaning up infested areas will be helpful in controlling bedbugs, getting rid of them usually requires chemical treatments. Because treating your bed and bedroom with insecticides can be harmful, it is important to use products that can be used safely in bedrooms. Do not treat mattresses and bedding unless the label specifically says you can use them on bedding.

          Generally it is safest and most effective to hire an experienced pest control professional for bedbug extermination.

          Sources

          University of Kentucky College of Agriculture: "Bed Bugs."

          Ohio State University Extension Fact Sheet: "Bed Bugs."

          The New York City Department of Heath and Mental Hygiene: "Stop Bed Bugs Safely."

          University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension Lancaster County: "Managing Bed Bugs."

          How to Get Rid of Bed Bugs at Home

          A new study shows bed bugs are very hard to kill. Here’s how to get rid of them—or prevent them from ever moving in.

          Two insecticides commonly used to kill bed bugs are becoming less effective against them, according to a study published today in the Journal of Economic Entomology.

          In the past 15 years, there has been a resurgence of bed bugs throughout the U.S., and people often struggle to rid their homes of the hardy pests, known for causing itchy red welts.

          After the bugs developed resistance against many of the most powerful pesticides, such as DDT, exterminators had been increasingly relying on two chemicals—chlorfenapyr and bifenthrin. But until now, no one had looked at whether bed bugs were developing defenses against these chemicals too, says Ameya D. Gondhalekar, one of the study authors and a research assistant professor at the Center for Urban and Industrial Pest Management at the Department of Entomology at Purdue University.

          Gondhalekar and his team exposed 10 different groups of bed bugs collected from different parts of the country to each of the chemicals in a glass vial. After several days, they examined how effective the chemicals were at killing the bugs.

          While most of the bed bugs were wiped out by the chemicals, three groups continued to thrive after being treated with chlorfenapyr, and five groups were still kicking after being treated with bifenthrin. That means that while some bed bugs will respond to these chemicals, others won’t—and it’s likely that more and more bugs will become resistant over time.

          “This is just more evidence that this pesticide-only approach to controlling bed bugs isn’t really working,” says Consumer Reports’ senior scientist Michael Hansen, Ph.D. “The take-away is that if you want to control these bed bugs, you can’t just spray.”

          How to Prevent a Bed Bug Infestation

          Prevention and vigilance are key to preventing a bed bug problem. “It’s much easier to control them if they are found early, [when there are only a few of them], as opposed to when they grow to number in the hundreds,” says Gondhalekar.

          Monitor your home.Bed bugs like to hide in cracks and crevices like walls, luggage, boxes, and clothing, but since they feed on humans while they sleep, they’re most commonly found in beds. If you suspect an infestation, or if you live in an apartment building with a bed bug problem, regularly inspect your bed sheets, mattress (including underneath), and box-spring seams for bugs. They’re flat and oval-shaped, with red or brown bodies, roughly the size of an apple seed. Watch for adults, nymphs, and eggs, as well as exoskeletons (casings that the bugs leave behind when they molt) and dark, rust-colored spots (feces).

          Encase your mattress.Enclosing your mattress, pillows, and box spring with a protective cover can block bed bugs from reaching their favorite hiding place.

          Be cautious when you travel.Hotel and motel rooms are hotbeds for bed bugs. When checking in, put your luggage in the bathroom, then inspect the bedding. Stow your suitcases on a luggage rack or a hard surface.

          When you return home, quarantine your bags.Decontaminate your luggage and clothing by putting your entire suitcase into a large chest freezer (if you have one) for four days, suggests Gondhalekar, before bringing them back into your home. Extreme hot or cold temperatures kills bed bugs. You can also put your clothes in the dryer on a hot setting for 30 minutes, and try steam cleaning your luggage and clothing.

          How to Treat a Bed Bug Infestation

          Minimize its spread.First, notify your landlord if you rent in a building to control its spread to other units. Thoroughly vacuum any infested areas, including carpets and mattresses, and then empty the vacuum bag into a plastic bag, seal it, and throw it in the trash outside. If you can’t get the bed bugs out of your furniture, discard items in a responsible manner. To avoid someone else from salvaging infested furniture or mattreses, rip, remove stuffing, or spray paint with the words “bed bugs.”

          Bring on the heat.Heating infested furniture or the entire apartment to a very high temperature—more than 100 degrees, in most cases—will kill bed bugs. If you have a hand-held steamer, blast cracks and crevices.

          Use an insecticide alternative.Substances such as diatomaceous earth, boric acid, and silica gel kill bed bugs by damaging their outer coating so they dry out and die. Put these powders into cracks and crevices around your home (being careful not to ingest or inhale them).

          Enlist professional help.Not all bed bugs respond the same way to insecticides, so if you have an infestation that you can’t control yourself, a professional can help you determine the correct treatment or insecticide to use.

          How to treat bed bugs yourself

          Before beginning your treatment it’s crucial you know all of the popular hiding locations of bed bugs. Be sure to follow the pre-requisite of this treatment procedures where do bed bugs hide , so you will know where to focus treatments.

          In this guide we will be focusing using a lab tested residual bed bug treatment as this will allow you to get rid of bed bugs permanently as it will kill the bed bugs as well as prevent re-infestation with proper re-treatments.

          Don’t be shy share this with friends and family to help them. Click below where they hang out and it will share it with them.

          Overview of treatment process

          1. Heat treatment in common bed bug colony locations (Optional)
          2. Preparing your residual bed bug spray for use
          3. How to kill bed bugs on bed
          4. How to treat bed bugs in your home
          5. How do you get rid of bed bugs in your laundry
          6. Clean and De-clutter home
          7. How to get rid of bed bugs permanently

          1. Heat treatment (Optional)

          A completely optional pre-treatment that works well is using a specialized bed bug steamer . You will simply use water in your steamer, plug it in, then wait about 5 minutes to allow the handheld steamer to heat the water over 230°F creating steam to be released when activating the trigger.

          The steamer is aimed at bedding and other bed bug locations which bed bugs hide, due to the immense heat from steam, the bed bugs die immediately.

          You would treat all the areas found from your inspection and is a fantastic pre-treatment before using a residual bed bug treatment which kills any remaining bed bugs and prevents from future infestations.

          2. Preparing your bed bug residual spray

          The Green Bean Buddy, bug killer was formulated to be ready to use and simple to implement. Due to the unique residual formulation it’s imperative you give it a good shaking before treating to mix the formula.

          Here are basic, yet important steps before use due to the natural formulation.

          • No mixing… it’s ready to use
          • Shake vigorously before each use
          • Aim and spray in popular bed bug hiding locations and around home

          Now let’s get to treating specific locations of your property now that your Green Bean Buddy, bug killer is ready to be used.

          3. How to kill bed bugs on bed

          Begin treating your bed with Green Bean Buddy, bug killer by spot treating locations, not drenching the area as this allows you to use the product later on for re-treatment and prevention.

          Pre-requisite before treating your bedding.

          • Remove pillow cases and sheets
          • Place pillows cases and sheets into tightly duct tape sealed garbage bags
          • Remove mattress protectors and encasements (Many people miss this step!)
          • Place mattress protectors and encasements in sealed garbage bags
          • Sealed linens and encasements will be washed later with special bed bug detergent

          Begin spot treatment of your bed and box spring.

          1. Spot treat on surface of bare mattress
          2. Spot treat between tufts and folds of matttress
          3. Pickup mattress and treat on underside
          4. Spot treat around head board
          5. Spot treat around box spring
          6. Remove air screens and spot treat box spring (if possible)
          7. Don’t forget… be sure encasements are removed while treating!

          Expanding treatment beyond the bed into the bedroom

          Our next objective is all the prone locations where bed bugs colonize in your bedroom. Remember, the infestation usually never is confined to just your bed.

          Lets spot treat the room just in case, below is a visual spot treatment guide you will want to spray your residual bed bug spray on and around.

          4. How to treat bed bugs in your home

          A bed bug infestation is likely to migrate into the living room and within your couches which you likely sit on. This is because these pest will follow you as you are the food source unfortunately.

          Don’t worry the below steps will ensure the bed bug residual spray will kill the bed bugs and protect your furniture and couches from re-infestation. Just remember to spot treat so you have product available for re-treatment.

          In other words… don’t drench the areas. Simply spot-treat! Below are areas you will want to treat.

          • Spot treat all locations in living room image below
          • Remove rugs, pillows, sheets & linens on furniture and treat
          • Place rugs, pillows, sheets, & linens in sealed garbage bags
          • Spot treat a barrier around living area on windows, doorways, and entrances

          Treat bed bugs in your home checklist

          • Couches and pillows (remove pillow cases)
          • Lift couch pillows and treat
          • Pickup couch and treat bottom (remove air-screens and treat)
          • Picture frames on counters and walls
          • Lamps
          • Light outlets
          • Carpet can be spot treated
          • Rugs can be removed, washed and spot treated

          Creating a barrier:After treating the living room be sure to spot treat and create a barrier around your living areas. This is extremely helpful in quarantining your property.

          5. How to get rid of bed bugs in your laundry

          A large part of re-infestation comes from the pest eggs or nymphs that are hidden in your laundry and linens. Then after a few weeks these nymphs and eggs grow and begin the re-production cycle all over again.

          To avoid re-infestation and to ensure your laundry is not the cause of the re-infestation. Green Bean Buddy, Hypo Allergenic detergent is formulated for the purpose to get rid of dust mites, bed bugs, fleas, ticks, roaches and other pests within linens thatnormal detergents will not be able to kill these pests.

          By following the procedures above, you should have your linens, encasements, sheets, etc all sealed in garbage bags with duct tape. This prevents these bed bugs scattering into the other areas of the room.

          Take these sealed garbage bags and place them into your laundry and wash them preferably a special hypo allergenic bed bug detergent .

          This is an highly effective detergent that was formulated for resorts and nursing homes with hyper sensitive guests. The formulation destroys all pests including bed bugs and dust mites and gets rid of danders that causing irritation. A powerful yet delicate detergent for properties infested with bed bugs, fleas, ticks, or dust mites.

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