Show Me Bed Bugs Pictures

Show me bed bugs pictures

See pictures of bed bugs and learn to identify what bed bugs and their bites look like to protect yourself against these nasty, bloodsucking pests.

Cimex lectularius, commonly known as bed bugs, are seed-size, wingless insects that infests beds and feeds on human blood.

Because of their size and their natural survival instinct to hide in ingenious places, bed bugs are usually hard to spot. In often cases, victims may not realize that there is a problem until bite marks start to show up on their skin.

Generally, adult bed bugs are tiny (about the size of an apple seed or 1/4 inch long) with flat rusty-brown-colored oval shaped bodies. However, after they feed on blood of hapless sleepers, their bodies can swell to a deeper red brown and up to 3/8 inch long.

The younger bugs, or ‘nymphs’ are smaller and are a whitish color, or sometimes a golden color. Until they are fed, after which, like the adult bugs, they turn a reddish color. While newly hatched nymphs can be seen with the human naked eye however, with their tiny size and white colored body, it makes them very hard to spot on the mattress.

What Do Bed Bugs Look Like?

Pictures of the bed bug nymph becomes engorged with blood during feeding

Actual size of a bed bug on a human hand

Size comparison of a bed bug with rice grains and two small eggs next to it

An i mage of an adult bed bug

What a fed bed bug looks like

Picture of A Bed Bug Life Cycle

The bed bug life cycle is relatively short; they can live anywhere from ten months to a year, but in that short time, they will see three generations come to life and feed on the hapless humans.

Female bed bugs lay anywhere from three to twelve eggs at a time and a single female bed bug can produce from 300 up to 500 eggs in their lifetime! Female bed bugs typically deposit their eggs in clusters of up to fifty and these can be found in cracks or crevices in the home. The eggs are about a millimeter in length and are a whitish color. The eggs will then hatch in less than twelve days.

The bugs go through five nymphal stages before reaching maturity. During each of these stages, the bed bugs molt. This maturation cycle takes about 48 days. During these stages they grow from just over one millimeter in length, to just over five millimeters in length, or about a quarter of an inch.

A cluster of bed bug eggs with nymphs

During this molting process, you may see signs of the bed bugs , because as nymphs molt, they leave behind the skins they have shed. These skins accumulate as the bug population rises. Bed bug excrement is another sign that you will see, as it appears as dark spots on the sheets. Crushed bed bugs will leave blood stains on bed sheets.

Bed bugs and eggs among molted skins

Bed bugs do have a short life cycle, but they can and will do a lot of damage during these months, in terms of reproducing and feeding on their victims. Waking up to a cluster of bite marks can be a serious sign of bed bugs in your house, apartment or hotel room.

Pictures of Bed Bug Bites And What Do They Look Like

Above: Bed bug bites on the arms

Top right: Bed bug rashes on the arm of a woman

Bottom right: Multiple bite marks on a woman’s leg

Bed bug bites are not dangerous nor do they transmit disease however the bites can leave red, irritating welts around the body large that may cause some people to itch intensely or develop an allergic reaction such as rashes . Psychologically, it may affect one with an inability to sleep.

The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) points out that an infestation is not a sign of unclean or unsanitary conditions. Bed bugs do not discriminate against the rich or poor nor are they attracted to dirt or filth and have been found in world class hotels, luxury condos and budget properties alike.

If you suspect that you have bed bugs in your home, try looking for the tiny white or brown-colored bugs in the seams of mattresses. Or check for tiny bloodstains or insect waste on the sheets. Bed bugs can be found most often in the seams, folds, edges and labels of mattresses, and tend to be found around beds or couches but there are also cases where they have been found in the cracks and crevices of walls, furniture and floors.

Pictures of bed bugs hiding in the seams of the mattress


Image credit: cuttlefish

Bed bug eggs, dried blood stains and waste found on the mattress

While bed bugs are tiny, it does not take an expert to find the bugs by looking at the above bed bugs pictures. However, these critters can be notoriously hard to get rid of since they can survive for more than a year without food until a new host comes along.

To prevent against an infestation, entomologists and pest control experts recommend using an Integrated Pest Management approach which includes clearing of clutter, vacuuming regularly, employing extreme heat on temperature-sensitive bed bugs and the use of pesticides. Heat treatment can include methods such as putting bedding or clothes into a dryer (minimum 120В°F) for 20 minutes or using a steam cleaner to heat treat the mattress or upholster furniture.

To protect oneself against bites while sleeping, use a bed bug proof mattress encasement designed to contain and kill bed bugs. For the encasement to be effective, keep it on for at least a year to prevent bed bugs from going in or out of the mattress. Those adult bugs, nymphs and eggs that are trapped will eventually died.

You May Also Be Interested In:

Bed Bugs Bite Pictures– See more photos of how bed bugs bite look like on other victims.

How Do You Get Bed Bugs– A look at how do you get bed bugs and how they are spread.

Bed Bugs Extermination– How to select a good pest management company for bed bug control.

This website’s mission is to provide comprehensive information about bed bugs .
Popular topics include how to kill bed bugs , bed bug rash , bed bugs treatment and what do bed bugs look like .

Bedbug Bites

Childhood Skin Problems

Photo courtesy of Phil Pellitteri, University of Wisconsin

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The first sign of bedbugs may be red, itchy bites on the skin, usually on the arms or shoulders. Bedbugs tend to leave straight rows of bites, unlike some other insects that leave bites here and there.

Bedbugs do not seem to spread disease to people. But itching from the bites can be so bad that some people will scratch enough to cause breaks in the skin that get infected easily. The bites can also cause an allergic reaction in some people. Read more about bedbug bites – symptoms, treatments and prevention.

Sources

Image: Photo courtesy of Phil Pellitteri, University of Wisconsin

Text: "Bedbugs – Overview", WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Bedbugs

What should you know about bedbugs?

Bedbugs (Cimex lectularius) are small, oval insects that feed by sucking blood from humans or other warm-blooded animals. The effect of bedbugs on human health and reports of bedbug infestations of certain hotels has received media attention in recent years.

How big are bedbugs?

Bedbugs do not fly. Adult bedbugs are 5-7 mm in length.

Where do bedbugs live?

Bedbugs are pests that can live anywhere in the home. They can live in cracks in furniture or in any type of textile, including upholstered furniture. Bedbug infestations are most common in beds, including the mattress, box springs, and bed frames. Bedbugs are most active at night. These pests may bite any exposed areas of skin while an individual is sleeping. Common locations for bedbug bites are the face, neck, hands, and arms.

Are bedbug bites painful?

A bedbug bite is painless and is generally not noticed. The bites may be mistaken for a rash of another cause. Small, flat, or raised bumps on the skin are the most common sign. Symptoms include redness, swelling, and itching.

How do you know if you have bedbugs?

Fecal stains or rust-colored dark spots, egg cases, and shed skins (exuviae) of bedbugs in crevices and cracks on or near beds are suggestive of infestations, but only observing the bugs themselves can confirm an active infestation. A professional pest-control company may be required to help identify and remove bedbugs from the home.

What home remedies and medications treat and get rid of bedbugs?

Home remedies for bedbug bites include measures to control itching, such as oatmeal baths or cool compresses. Typically, no treatment is required for bedbug bites. If itching is severe, steroid creams or oral antihistamines may be used for symptom relief.

Picture of Bedbug Bites

The first sign of bedbugs may be red, itchy bites on the skin, usually on the arms or shoulders. Bedbugs tend to leave straight rows of bites, unlike some other insects that leave bites here and there.

Bedbugs do not seem to spread disease to people. But itching from the bites can be so bad that some people will scratch enough to cause breaks in the skin that get infected easily.

What are bedbugs? What do bedbugs look like?

Bedbugs are small oval-shaped non-flying insects that belong to the insect familyCimicidae, which includes three species that bite people. Adult bedbugs reach 5 mm-7 mm in length, while nymphs (juveniles) are as small as 1.5 mm. Bedbugs have flat bodies and may sometimes be mistaken for ticks or small cockroaches. Bedbugs feed by sucking blood from humans or animals.Cimex lectulariusis the scientific name for bedbugs.

Adult bedbugs are reddish brown in color, appearing engorged and more reddish after feeding on a blood meal. Nymphs are light-colored and appear bright red after feeding. The wings of bedbugs are vestigial, so they cannot fly. However, they are able to crawl rapidly.

Temperatures between 70 F-80 F are most favorable for bedbugs, allowing them to develop into adults most rapidly and produce up to three generations per year.

Where are bedbugs found?

Bedbugs are found all over the world. Bedbug infestations were common in the U.S. before World War II and became rare after widespread use of the pesticide DDT for pest control began in the 1940s and 1950s. They remained prevalent in other areas of the world and, in recent years, have been increasingly observed again in the U.S. Increases in immigration and travel from the developing world as well as restrictions on the use of stronger insecticides may be factors that have led to the relatively recent increase in bedbug infestations. While bedbug infestations are often reported to be found when sanitation conditions are poor or when birds or mammals (particularly bats) are nesting on or near a home, bedbugs can also live and thrive in clean environments. Crowded living quarters also facilitate the spread of bedbug infestations.

Bedbugs can live in any area of the home and use tiny cracks in furniture as well as on textiles and upholstered furniture as hiding places. They tend to be most common in areas where people sleep and generally concentrate in beds, including mattresses or mattress covers, box springs, and bed frames. They do not infest the sleeping surfaces of beds as commonly as cracks and crevices associated with the bed frame and mattress, including mattress seams. Other sites where bedbugs often reside and potential infested items include curtains, edges of carpet, corners inside dressers and other furniture, cracks in wallpaper (particularly near the bed), and inside the spaces of wicker furniture.

Since bedbugs can live for months or even longer under favorable conditions without feeding, they can also be found in vacant homes.

SLIDESHOW

Are bedbugs found in hotels?

Bedbugs are found all over the world. Bedbug infestations were common in the U.S. before World War II and became rare after widespread use of the pesticide DDT for pest control began in the 1940s and 1950s. They remained prevalent in other areas of the world and, in recent years, have been increasingly observed again in the U.S. Increases in immigration and travel from the developing world as well as restrictions on the use of stronger insecticides may be factors that have led to the relatively recent increase in bedbug infestations. While bedbug infestations are often reported to be found when sanitation conditions are poor or when birds or mammals (particularly bats) are nesting on or near a home, bedbugs can also live and thrive in clean environments. Crowded living quarters also facilitate the spread of bedbug infestations.

Bedbugs can live in any area of the home and use tiny cracks in furniture as well as on textiles and upholstered furniture as hiding places. Bedbugs tend to be most common in areas where people;

  • sleep,
  • they usually concentrate in beds, including;
  • mattresses or mattress covers,
  • box springs and bed frames,
  • matttress seams and cracks,
  • curtains,
  • edges of carpet,
  • corners inside dressers and other furniture,
  • cracks in wallpaper (particularly near the bed),
  • recently used suitcases, bags, and other things that you have taken outside of your home, and
  • inside the spaces of wicker furniture.
  • They do not infest the sleeping surfaces of beds as commonly as cracks and crevices associated with the bed frame and mattress, including mattress seams. Other sites where bedbugs often reside and potential infested items

    Many news reports in recent years have focused on the discovery of bedbugs and their health effects (even in upscale five-star hotels), and a number of lawsuits have been filed by guests of fashionable hotels who awoke to find hundreds of bedbug bites covering their skin. Searching on travel-review web sites regularly reveals information and even photos confirming the presence of bedbugs in numerous hotels.

    Since bedbugs can arrive on the clothing or in the suitcases of guests from infested homes or other hotels harboring the pests, hotels can be an easy target for bedbug infestations.

    In addition to hotels, bedbug infestations have been found in;

    edbugs are found all over the world. Bedbug infestations were common in the U.S. before World War II and became rare after widespread use of the pesticide DDT for pest control began in the 1940s and 1950s. They remained prevalent in other areas of the world and, in recent years, have been increasingly observed again in the U.S. Increases in immigration and travel from the developing world as well as restrictions on the use of stronger insecticides may be factors that have led to the relatively recent increase in bedbug infestations. While bedbug infestations are often reported to be found when sanitation conditions are poor or when birds or mammals (particularly bats) are nesting on or near a home, bedbugs can also live and thrive in clean environments. Crowded living quarters also facilitate the spread of bedbug infestations.

    Bedbugs can live in any area of the home and use tiny cracks in furniture as well as on textiles and upholstered furniture as hiding places. They tend to be most common in areas where people sleep and generally concentrate in beds, including mattresses or mattress covers, box springs, and bed frames. They do not infest the sleeping surfaces of beds as commonly as cracks and crevices associated with the bed frame and mattress, including mattress seams. Other sites where bedbugs often reside and potential infested items include curtains, edges of carpet, corners inside dressers and other furniture, cracks in wallpaper (particularly near the bed), and inside the spaces of wicker furniture.

    Since bedbugs can live for months or even longer under favorable conditions without feeding, they can also be found in vacant homes.

    How do bedbugs spread?

    Bedbugs live in any articles of furniture, clothing, or bedding, so they or their eggs may be present in used furniture or clothing. They spread by crawling and may contaminate multiple rooms in a home or even multiple dwellings in apartment buildings. They may also hide in boxes, suitcases, or other items that are moved from residence to residence or from a hotel to home. Bedbugs can live on clothing from home infestations and may be spread by a person unknowingly wearing infested clothing.

    What Do Bed Bugs Look Like?

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    This is what an adult bed bug looks like. You can tell from the size and dark color throughout.

    This is what a recently fed young bed bug looks like; notice that dark spot inside it? That’s blood which it has been feeding upon.

    This is what bed bug shells look like, also referred to as a skin or casing. As the bed bug grows, it sheds its shell

    These are some smaller bed bug shells

    These are what bed bug eggs look like that have hatched. New eggs are not transparent, white, and sticky and look like rice.

    This is what bed bug poop looks like and is dried blood that was excreted.

    A baby bed bug (1st instar) is only a millimeter in size and almost transparent making it very easy for them to blend into the background. Once they get their first drop of your blood, their body elongates and turn a reddish-brow color. They are very difficult to see at this stage.

    So what do bed bugs look like? They look like an apple seed and can grow in size to 7mm with a flat or oval shape depending on the last time they fed. They survive by feeding on your blood and can go for many months without food once fully fed.

    There are 28 pictures below showing the size of a bed bug at different stages in its lifecycle, from hatchling, to baby, to a fully fed adult. Many are displayed next to objects to give you an idea of just how small they really are, such as the larvae (bed bug eggs) in item #5 above. The most commonly found size is the bed bug shown next to the measuring tape.

    What Do Bed Bug Bites Look Like? Here’s Exactly How to Spot the Symptoms

    If you wake up with a line of three to four itchy, swollen bumps, it could be due to bed bugs.

    Waking up with a fresh set of itchy bug bites can bring on its own set of worries. What, exactly, was biting you in the middle of the night? Was it a spider? Mosquito? Or—possibly theworstcase scenario—could it have been bed bugs?

    Although bed bugs might not be the first thing we think of when we wake up with a bite, the crittersdoget their food source from our blood—and will leave a little red bump in their wake after getting their fill.

    But the trouble with identifying a bed bug bite—as is true for a lot of insects, including mosquitoes—is that it can be hard to identify the source of the bite, as everyone reacts differently to being bitten based on what their body’s immune response is. “Everybody’s going to respond differently,” saysTimothy Gibb, PhD, a clinical professor of entomology at Purdue University. “Same thing’s true with a mosquito bite. Some people are going to swell up and it’s going to itch. That same mosquito could bite someone else and it’s hardly noticeable.”

    In fact, Gibb says some people may have no response when being bitten by a bed bug at all, based solely on how their immune system handles the bite. That’s why it can be difficult to determine whether your bite is the result of a bed bug just by looking at it.

    But therearea few things that can tip you off to the fact that bed bugs are the culprit of your bites. Here’s what to know, including bed bug bites pictures to help you visualize the symptoms.

    What do bed bug bites look like?

    The key bed bug bite symptom to look for is a red, raised bump, says Gibb, similar in appearance to what you would get when bitten by a spider or a mosquito. But what sets bed bugs apart from other insects is that oftentimes,their bites will present in a line on one part or side of your body. This is the result of what’s called “probing.”

    ⚠️ Bed bug bites show up in a line, most often in a cluster of 3 to 4 bites.

    “They probe the skin in several different places, I think probably to find best access to draw blood,” says Gibb. In fact, if you have screens on your windows—thereby keeping out other insects that might bite—but are still waking up with aline of 3 or 4 bites on your arm, it’s safe to suspect that bed bugs might be to blame, saysEdwin Rajotte, PhD, a professor of entomology at Penn State University.

    Another way to determine if your bites are a result from bed bugs is to look for the insects themselves. They naturally like to hide in on your mattress, especially in the corners, near the head end, and in the cord that goes around it. They also like to camp out behind the headboard, behind any pictures on the wall, and in any electrical sockets.

    Adult bed bugs are about the the size of an apple seed and are very flat from top to bottom—almost as thin as a piece of paper—with a brownish color, says Rajotte. Baby bed bugs are also brownish in color, but pinhead-sized. Another key identifier? Look for black spots on your sheets, mattress, and mattress cover, which could be bed bug feces.

    Where do bed bugs bite, exactly?

    Bed bug bites willmost commonly occur on the arms, neck, or trunk of the body, says Gibb, although they’ll bite anywhere they can find exposed skin. And—as their name suggests—bed bugs will bite you at night while you’re sound asleep.

    “We’ve found it’s most active when people are most sound asleep, and that’s usually from about 2:00 to 4:00 in the morning,” says Gibb. “That’s natural for a parasite like that to do that because it’s going to protect it. People won’t see it, they won’t feel it. It makes their survivorship much more probable.”

    Are bed bug bites itchy? Do they hurt?

    Although some people will say a bed bug bite hurts somewhat—though not as intensely as the sting of a bee, for example—most complaints are due to the itching the bites cause, says Gibb. And that itching is due to the chemicals the bed bug inserts into your body during the bite, adds Rajotte.

    “They’ve become what I consider the perfect parasite, because their mouthparts are kind of interesting,” says Gibb. “They will inject an anesthetic prior to biting, so people won’t feel it. And then they inject an anticoagulant that allows the blood to run easier for them to suck that up.” So while that system works great for thebugs, those left-over chemicals will usually lead to some uncomfortable itching on your end.

    How long do bed bug bites last?

    Although the duration and intensity of a bed bug bite will hugely vary from person to person, you typically won’t feel the effects of a bed bug bite—like itching and those raised red bumps—until mid-morning after a bite due to the anesthetic the bug injects, says Gibb. “So they certainly don’t feel it when the bite is occurring, but shortly after, probably within a day, for sure,” he adds.

    From there, a bed bug bite will stay with you for typically at least 24 hours, though theycould last three to five days after the initial bite, says Gibb. At that point, the bite will then start to slowly dissipate.

    How to treat bed bug bites

    If you’ve received a bed bug bite (and the itching that comes along with it), chances are, you’re going to want to speed up the treatment process. But unfortunately, the best way to do that is also thehardestway to do it: not scratching the bite, says Gibb, which will just further irritate the area.

    If you’re having trouble keeping your fingers away from the bite, you can also try using an antihistamine—think Benadryl or Allegra, which are meant to curb allergy symptoms—to help mute that itchy feeling.

    And if bed bugsarethe cause of your bites, realize there’s no urgent need to panic. Yes, they might cost you a pretty penny and can be a pain to get rid of, but bed bugs can’t do any serious damage to your body.“They don’t kill people,” says Gibb. “A parasite would have a hard time surviving if it killed its host, and these do not.”

    In fact, they don’t even transmit anything dangerous to you.“They’ve never been shown to transmit any diseases,”says Rajotte. “Unlike mosquitoes and ticks and things, which can transmit some pretty bad diseases, bed bugs do not. And so while they’re annoying and all that, they’re not going to harm your children or anything like that. They’re just annoying and you need to get rid of them.”

    Ready to banish them from your home? Here’s our expert-approved, step-by-step guide to getting rid of bed bugs for good.

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